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Price History for Scott C3a in OG

Scott No.
Denom.
Condition
Total
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
70J
75
75J
80
80J
85
85J
90
90J
95
95J
98
98J
100
100J
C3a
24c
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Three things to keep in mind when looking at the above results (unsolds are not included):

  1. It is important to look at the individual data points listed below. Price swings up may be due to varieties such as broken hat or other positives such as cancels. Price swings down may be due to factors such as faults on items that would have graded higher if they were sound, and may not be considered as desirable as a sound copy in this grade.
  2. When looking at multiple grades on the graph, grades with the same population numbers may show overlapping.
  3. At the time of an auction, the SMQ value has already been published and is available to bidders. Increases or decreases in SMQ value prior to the auction may affect the price realized.

This information is provided for hobbyists and is not intended to represent philatelic material as an investment or financial instrument. Past performance is neither an indication nor guarantee of future performance. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, but Siegel Auction Galleries (including its representatives and affiliates) is not liable for errors or omissions of any kind. "SMQ" refers to Stamp Market Quarterly, a copyrighted publication, and the information is used with the copyright holder's permission.

Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
95
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2016-05-31
Inverted Jenny Position 58, Graded XF-Superb 95
275°
PSE 95
og
Sale Number 1128, Lot Number 275, Jenny 95: Position 58 Inverted Jenny, Graded XF-Superb 95 (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 58, nearly perfect centering, fresh and bright colors, barely hinged at bottom left

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS MAGNIFICENT EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY IS GRADED XF-SUPERB 95 BY PROFESSIONAL STAMP EXPERTS. THIS STAMP HAS ALWAYS BEEN REGARDED AS ONE OF THE FINEST FROM THE ORIGINAL DISCOVERY SHEET OF 100. IT IS THE ONLY INVERTED JENNY TO HAVE MET THE RIGOROUS STANDARDS FOR THE XF-SUPERB 95 GRADE.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on 14 May 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. Soon after, the sheet was sold to Colonel Edward H. R. Green through Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Green paid $20,000 for Robey’s sheet, then instructed Klein to divide it into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is possible to reconstruct the Inverted Jenny sheet with photographs of the singles and blocks (see the reconstruction on page 62). Based on centering alone, most would grade 70 or 75. Only a few stamps could possibly qualify for a Professional Stamp Experts (P.S.E.) grade of VF 80 or better. In our opinion, the centering of the stamp to the right of this one--Position 59--should qualify it for XF-Superb 95, but no others could achieve 95 (or better).

Condition is another factor limiting the grade potential of Inverted Jenny stamps. Despite their great rarity and value, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. A couple still remain unphotographed, and one was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner. Finally, with the discovery of a third stamp from the stolen McCoy block--recognized by The Philatelic Foundation’s expert staff when it was submitted by an auction firm--only one purloined Inverted Jenny remains at large.

The stamp offered here, Position 58, is remarkable for its pristine state of preservation and for its centering. It was originally the lower right stamp in a block of four, comprising Positions 47-48/57-58, which was owned by Eugene Klein, the dealer who bought the sheet from Robey. It was inherited by Klein’s daughter, Delores Klein Hertz, who sold it to Robert A. Siegel. Mr. Siegel sold the block to Raymond H. Weill, who placed it with Benjamin D. Phillips in July 1959. The Weills bought the Phillips collection in 1968 for $4.07 million and sold the block to another collector. According to Raymond Weill, he was asked to divide the block into singles for four different heirs. Position 58 was sold to a Mr. Hoover in 1975, who sold it at auction in 1985 to West Coast collector Bruce McNall. Mr. McNall partly paid for it with an exchange for Position 3.

After Robert Zoellner’s first Inverted Jenny fell out of his Scott Platinum album and was sucked up by a vacuum cleaner, he replaced the wounded copy with this stamp, which he purchased in the Superior Stamp & Coin auction of McNall’s collection. In our sale of the Zoellner collection (Sale 804), the stamp realized $192,500 (including the 10% buyer’s premium), selling to a private collector. When our firm was asked to offer it in the 2005 Rarities of the World sale (Sale 895), we obtained a P.S.E. certificate with a grade of XF-Superb 95. The stamp shattered the previous record for a single, realizing $577,500 (including the 10% buyer’s premium). It is now offered on behalf of the buyer.

Ex Colonel E. H. R. Green, Eugene Klein, Delores Klein Hertz, B. D. Phillips, Weill (to an anonymous collector), Hoover (according to Weill), McNall, Zoellner (to anonymous collector), anonymous collector to the current owner at Siegel 2005 Rarities of the World sale (Sale 895, lot 374).

With 2005 P.S.E. certificate (graded OGph XF-Superb 95; see photo on page 61) and encapsulated since 2005. The next highest grade in the P.S.E. Population Report is VF-XF 85.

Scott U.S. Specialized Catalogue value for the highest grade listed (VF-XF 85) is $525,000

P.S.E. Stamp Market Quarterly value for XF-Superb 95 is $1,600,000

525,000
1,175,000
2005-06-03
2005 Rarities of the World
374°
PSE 95
og
Sale Number 895, Lot Number 374, Air Post 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 58, nearly perfect centering, fresh and bright colors, barely hinged at bottom left

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS SUPERB EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" IS GRADED XF-SUP 95 BY PROFESSIONAL STAMP EXPERTS. IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN REGARDED AS ONE OF THE FINEST STAMPS FROM THE ORIGINAL DISCOVERY PANE OF 100, IN TERMS OF CENTERING AND OVERALL CONDITION, AND IT NOW BECOMES THE ONLY INVERTED "JENNY" TO MEET THE RIGOROUS STANDARDS OF "XF-SUP 95". PERHAPS ONE OTHER MIGHT QUALIFY FOR THIS COVETED HIGH GRADE.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original pane of 100 inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was placed on sale. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in Washington, D.C. Soon after, the sheet was sold to Col. Edward H. R. Green through Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Green paid $20,000 for the sheet, then instructed Klein to divide it into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of this stamp come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and at least seven have been "lost" to philately--or nearly so as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner. This example is remarkable for its pristine state of preservation and for its centering, which only a few stamps in the original sheet can approach (almost all of the others have disturbed gum or faults).

This stamp was originally part of a block of four owned by stamp dealer Eugene Klein. It was inherited by Klein's daughter who sold it to Robert A. Siegel. Mr. Siegel sold it to Raymond H. Weill, who placed it with two different anonymous collectors before being asked to break it into singles. This single was sold by Mr. Weill to a Mr. Hoover in 1975, who sold it at auction in 1985 to West Coast collector Bruce McNall. Mr. McNall partly paid for it with an exchange for Position 3. It was last offered in our sale of the Zoellner collection, selling for $192,500 (with the buyer's premium) to a private collector. The stamp is now offered to the market for the first time with a P.S.E. graded certificate, confirming in numeric terms what we have always subjectively stated, that no finer example of the celebrated Inverted "Jenny" can be obtained.

With 1985 P.F. certificate and 2005 P.S.E. certificate (XF-SUP 95)

170,000
525,000
Back to Top
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
85
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2011-06-18
2011 Rarities of the World
120°
PSE 85
og
Sale Number 1010, Lot Number 120, 1918 24-Cent Inverted Jenny24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 35, unusually choice centering with wide and well-balanced margins on all sides, fresh and bright colors, small hinged area

EXTREMELY FINE. A REMARKABLY FRESH AND BEAUTIFULLY CENTERED EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY". THIS STAMP IS ONE OF THE BEST-CENTERED POSITIONS FROM THE DISCOVERY SHEET.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and at least seven have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner. This example is remarkable for its pristine state of preservation and for its centering, equalled by only a few stamps in the original sheet (almost all of the others have disturbed gum or faults).

Ex Steffan and Bruechig. With 1969 and 2005 P.F. certificates (the latter graded VF-XF 85) and 2005 P.S.E. certificate (OGph, VF-XF 85; SMQ $810,000.00). The P.S.E. Population Report lists only one graded 95, one graded 85 (this stamp) and two graded 80, followed by others in lower grades.

500,000
350,000
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
75
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2014-06-26
2014 Rarities of the World
1182°
PSE 75
og
Sale Number 1075, Lot Number 1182, Inverted Jenny (C3a) and Upright Jenny Souvenir Sheet24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 73, lightly hinged, deep rich colors, choice centering, possibly a small thin spot but not visible to the eye or in fluid

VERY FINE CENTERING AND WONDERFULLY FRESH EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY.

According to Jenny! by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was placed on sale. Robey bought the sheet at the New York Avenue Post Office window in Washington, D.C. Soon after, the sheet was sold to Col. Edward H. R. Green through Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Green paid $20,000 for the sheet, then instructed Klein to divide it into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Stamp specialists and professionals know that examples of this stamp exist in different grades of freshness and condition. Despite their rarity and value, many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinging has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and at least seven have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here is beautifully centered and remarkably fresh. Earlier in its history this stamp was described as having a "tiny gum thin", and the Philatelic Foundation issued certificate 55645 in the 1970's describing a "small thin spot". Even in fluid, the stamp shows no evidence of a thin, and it is possible that the earlier P.F. opinion was influenced by the presence of a hinge remnant, which has since been removed. In 1999 Professional Stamp Experts certified it as sound. It is offered here on the basis of our full disclosure of its history and may not be returned if the Philatelic Foundation reaffirms the presence of a thin spot.

P.S.E. encapsulated (OGph, F-VF 75; SMQ $385,000.00)

450,000
210,000
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
70
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2012-11-28
The Merlin Collection of Superb United States Stamps
522°
PSE 70
og
Sale Number 1034, Lot Number 522, Air Post including Inverted Jenny Position 4824c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 48, lightly hinged, deep rich colors and detailed impressions, remarkably fresh for this rarity, long and full perforations all around with bottom perforations showing part of guide line, two tiny thin spots at left are barely noticeable

VERY FINE AND CHOICE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

This stamp was originally part of a block of four from Positions 47-48/57-58 that was owned by stamp dealer Eugene Klein. It was inherited by Klein's daughter who sold it to Robert A. Siegel. Mr. Siegel sold it to Raymond H. Weill, who placed it with two different anonymous collectors before being asked to break it into singles. Positions 57 and 58 are among the best-centered examples in the entire sheet, and all four are remarkably fresh.

With 2012 P.F. certificate. With 2006 P.S.E. certificate (F 70; SMQ $340,000.00)

450,000
210,000
2012-06-26
2012 Rarities of the World
243
PSE 70
og
Sale Number 1025, Lot Number 243, Air Post: Inverted Jenny (Scott C3a, Position 24)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 24, rich colors on bright paper, fresh original gum, single hinge mark

FRESH AND FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

Ex Frank B. Allen, Hewitt and Hoffman. With 1985 P.F., 2005 and 2012 P.S.E. certificates (OGph, Fine 70). The SMQ value in Fine 70 is $340,000.00, but it jumps to $650,000.00 in VF 80 (F-VF 75 is not priced). Based on recent market activity and the attractiveness of this sound example of the Inverted "Jenny", we think it will probably outperform its current SMQ value.

450,000
280,000
Back to Top
2008-05-08
The Jay Hoffman Collection of United States Stamps
534
PSE 70
og
Sale Number 956, Lot Number 534, Air Post24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 24, rich colors on bright paper, fresh original gum, single hinge mark

FRESH AND FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

Ex Frank B. Allen and Hewitt. With 1985 P.F. and 2005 P.S.E. certificates (Fine 70). The SMQ value in Fine 70 is $380,000.00, but it jumps to $650,000.00 in VF 80 (F-VF 75 is not priced). Based on recent market activity and the attractiveness of this sound example of the Inverted "Jenny", we think it will probably outperform its current SMQ value.

400,000
300,000
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