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Price History for Scott 19 in Used 80 Grade

Scott No.
Denom.
Condition
Total
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
70J
75
75J
80
80J
85
85J
90
90J
95
95J
98
98J
100
100J
19
1c
19
2
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Three things to keep in mind when looking at the above results (unsolds are not included):

  1. It is important to look at the individual data points listed below. Price swings up may be due to varieties such as broken hat or other positives such as cancels. Price swings down may be due to factors such as faults on items that would have graded higher if they were sound, and may not be considered as desirable as a sound copy in this grade.
  2. When looking at multiple grades on the graph, grades with the same population numbers may show overlapping.
  3. At the time of an auction, the SMQ value has already been published and is available to bidders. Increases or decreases in SMQ value prior to the auction may affect the price realized.

This information is provided for hobbyists and is not intended to represent philatelic material as an investment or financial instrument. Past performance is neither an indication nor guarantee of future performance. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, but Siegel Auction Galleries (including its representatives and affiliates) is not liable for errors or omissions of any kind. "SMQ" refers to Stamp Market Quarterly, a copyrighted publication, and the information is used with the copyright holder's permission.

Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
98J
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2014-06-26
2014 Rarities of the World
1053°
PSE 98J
 
Sale Number 1075, Lot Number 1053, 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 92L4, wide-spaced perforations at top and bottom, perfectly centered with wide margins at right and left, rich color, lightly cancelled by "Boston 18 Sep. Paid" circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS IS WITHOUT QUESTION THE FINEST RECORDED SINGLE OF THE RARE 1857 ONE-CENT TYPE IA PERFORATED. VERY FEW EXIST WITH WIDE-SPACED PERFORATIONS.THIS IS WIDELY REGARDED AS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT USED CLASSIC UNITED STATES STAMPS IN EXISTENCE. THIS MAGNIFICENT STAMP HAS BEEN AWARDED THE GRADE OF SUPERB 98 JUMBO BY P.S.E.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spaces between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

The exceptions to the normal cut-into condition of top-row and bottom-row Plate 4 stamps are those with wide-spaced perforations. It has been assumed for years that the pins of the bottom row of the perforator were reset to create more space, but some students of the 1851-57 Issue have begun to reexamine this aspect of Plate 4 production to seek alternative explanations for wide-spaced perforations. Whatever the cause, wide-spaced stamps are extremely rare and highly desirable, because they exhibit all of the features that define their respective types. The so-called Waterhouse strip (ex Sir Nicholas Waterhouse, Saul Newbury, Mortimer Neinken and Jerome S. Wagshal) is the most famous of 1c 1857 Type Ia wide-spaced examples. Although a small number of single wide-spaced stamps are recorded, the example offered in this sale is the best-centered and one of the few completely sound stamps. When it was acquired by the late Amos Eno decades ago, this extraordinary stamp realized ten times Scott Catalogue value. In our firm's 1993 private treaty sale of the stamp to Robert Zoellner and when it was acquired by the owner of the Tahoe collection at the Shreve sale of the Hinrichs collection, it realized this same multiple of catalogue. In the 2008 Siegel sale of the Tahoe collection it shattered its previous records by realizing 33 times Scott Retail value.

Ashbrook states: "I consider perforated Type IA stamps that are not touched by perforations as the rarest stamps in the 1857 perforated issue." (Neinken book, p. 279). The Scott Catalogue contains a footnote to the basic price quotes: "Copies of this stamp exist with perforations not touching the design at any point. Such copies command very high prices."

Ex Eno, Zoellner, Hinrichs and Tahoe. With 2004 P.F. and 2008 P.S.E. certificates (Superb 98 Jumbo; SMQ $330,000.00). The P.S.E. Population Report lists 17 graded examples of Scott 19 (16 used, 1 OG). This Superb 98J is trailed by two 95's and three 90's (the OG copy is graded 30).

9,000
150,000
2008-02-27
The Tahoe Collection of Superb Used U.S. Stamps
14
PSE 98J
 
Sale Number 951, Lot Number 14, 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 92L4, wide-spaced perforations at top and bottom, perfectly centered with wide margins at right and left, rich color, lightly cancelled by "Boston 18 Sep. Paid" circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS IS WITHOUT QUESTION THE FINEST RECORDED SINGLE OF THE RARE 1857 ONE-CENT TYPE IA PERFORATED. VERY FEW EXIST WITH WIDE-SPACED PERFORATIONS.THIS IS WIDELY REGARDED AS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT USED CLASSIC UNITED STATES STAMPS IN EXISTENCE. THIS MAGNIFICENT STAMP HAS BEEN AWARDED THE GRADE OF SUPERB 98 JUMBO BY P.S.E.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spaces between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

The exceptions to the normal cut-into condition of top-row and bottom-row Plate 4 stamps are those with wide-spaced perforations. It has been assumed for years that the pins of the bottom row of the perforator were reset to create more space, but some students of the 1851-57 Issue have begun to reexamine this aspect of Plate 4 production to seek alternative explanations for wide-spaced perforations. Whatever the cause, wide-spaced stamps are extremely rare and highly desirable, because they exhibit all of the features that define their respective types. The so-called Waterhouse strip (ex Sir Nicholas Waterhouse, Saul Newbury and Mortimer Neinken; illustrated on p. 280 of the Neinken book) is the most famous of 1c 1857 Type Ia wide-spaced examples. Although a small number of single wide-spaced stamps are recorded, the example offered in this sale is the best-centered and one of the few completely sound stamps. When it was acquired by the late Amos Eno decades ago, this extraordinary stamp realized ten times Scott Catalogue value. In 1993 our firm sold this stamp by private treaty to Robert Zoellner for the same multiple of Scott value. It also realized the same multiple of catalogue value when acquired by the present owner at the Shreve sale of the Hinrichs collection.

Ashbrook states: "I consider perforated Type IA stamps that are not touched by perforations as the rarest stamps in the 1857 perforated issue." (Neinken book, p. 279). The Scott Catalogue contains a footnote to the basic price quotes: "Copies of this stamp exist with perforations not touching the design at any point. Such copies command very high prices."

Ex Eno, Zoellner and Hinrichs. With 2004 P.F. and 2008 P.S.E. certificates (Superb 98 Jumbo; SMQ $180,000 as 98). The P.S.E. Population Report lists seven graded examples of Scott 19 (6 used, 1 OG). This Superb 98J is trailed by one 90 and four graded 40 or below (the OG copy is a 30).

10,000
330,000
Back to Top
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
95
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2019-05-01
Gem-Quality United States Stamps
1056
PSE 95
 
Sale Number 1199, Lot Number 1056, 1c-3c 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-26)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 92L4, deep rich color and proof-like impression on bright paper, unusually choice centering with wide and balanced margins, clearly showing the type characteristics, neat strike of circular datestamp at right

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS IS WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE FINEST USED EXAMPLES OF THE RARE 1857 ONE-CENT TYPE Ia PERFORATED. THIS REMARKABLE STAMP IS GRADED XF-SUPERB 95 BY P.S.E. -- APART FROM THE FAMOUS WIDE-SPACED EXAMPLE, THIS IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spaces between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

The example offered here, with perforations completely clear of the design and showing the full type characteristics at bottom, is a true condition rarity.

Ex Bowman. With 1990 and 1999 P.F. certificates, the former as on cover with two Scott 24 (cover with other stamps accompanies). With 2008 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95; SMQ $92,500.00). Only one has graded higher (the wide-setting copy, ex Eno, Zoellner, Hinrichs and "Tahoe", graded 98J) and one other shares this desirable grade.

9,000
45,000
2015-09-29
The Robert Bowman Collection of Superb U.S. Stamps
18
PSE 95
 
Sale Number 1108, Lot Number 18, 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-39)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 92L4, deep rich color and proof-like impression on bright paper, unusually choice centering with wide and balanced margins, clearly showing the type characteristics, neat strike of circular datestamp at right

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS IS WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE FINEST USED EXAMPLES OF THE RARE 1857 ONE-CENT TYPE IA PERFORATED. THIS REMARKABLE STAMP HAS BEEN GRADED XF-SUPERB 95 BY P.S.E. -- APART FROM THE FAMOUS WIDE-SPACED EXAMPLE, THIS IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spaces between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

The example offered here, with perforations completely clear of the design and showing the full type characteristics at bottom, is a true condition rarity.

With 1990 and 1999 P.F. certificates, the former as on cover with two Scott 24 (cover with other stamps accompanies). With 2008 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95; SMQ $92,000.00). Only one has graded higher (the wide-setting copy, ex Eno, Zoellner, Hinrichs and Tahoe, graded 98J) and one other shares this desirable grade.

9,000
40,000
Back to Top
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
90
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2020-04-08
The Edward Morton Collection of Outstanding Quality U.S. Stamps
87
PSE 90
 
Sale Number 1219, Lot Number 87, 1c 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-24)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 97R4, unusually choice centering for this difficult issue with wide and balanced margins, deep rich color and proof-like impression on bright paper, neat strike of large Boston "Paid" grid leaves the type's defining characteristics clearly visible

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB USED EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 ONE-CENT PERFORATED TYPE Ia. THIS IS ONE OF THE SCARCEST AND MOST DESIRABLE TYPES OF THE ISSUE.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

Ashbrook states: "I consider perforated Type Ia stamps that are not touched by perforations as the rarest stamps in the 1857 perforated issue." (Neinken book, p. 279). The Scott Catalogue contains a footnote: "Copies of this stamp exist with perforations not touching the design at any point. Such copies command very high prices."

Ex "Natalee Grace" and Curtis. With 1998 and 2014 P.F. certificates. With 2009 P.S.E. certificate (XF 90; SMQ $32,000.00). Only three grade higher, including the famous Zoellner-Hinrichs copy with wide-spaced perforations (graded 98J).

9,000
13,000
2014-11-05
The Curtis Collection: 1847-1901 Stamps and Covers
3092
PSE 90
 
Sale Number 1084, Lot Number 3092, 1c 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-24)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 97R4, unusually choice centering for this difficult issue, wide and balanced margins, deep rich color and proof-like impression on bright paper, neat strike of large Boston "Paid" grid leaves the type's defining characteristics clearly visible

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB USED EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 ONE-CENT PERFORATED TYPE Ia. THIS IS ONE OF THE SCARCEST AND MOST DESIRABLE TYPES OF THE ISSUE.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spacing between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

Ashbrook states: "I consider perforated Type Ia stamps that are not touched by perforations as the rarest stamps in the 1857 perforated issue." (Neinken book, p. 279). The Scott Catalogue contains a footnote to the basic price quotes: "Copies of this stamp exist with perforations not touching the design at any point. Such copies command very high prices."

Ex Natalee Grace. With 1998 P.F. and 2009 P.S.E. certificates (XF 90; SMQ $31,000.00). Only three have graded higher, including the famous Zoellner-Hinrichs copy with wide-spaced perforations (graded 98J).

9,000
22,000
Back to Top
2012-11-28
The Merlin Collection of Superb United States Stamps
42
PSE 90
 
Sale Number 1034, Lot Number 42, 1857-60 Issue and 1875 Reprint (Scott 18-47)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 100R4, deep rich color and proof-like impression on bright paper, unusually choice centering for this difficult issue, face-free strike of circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB USED EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 ONE-CENT PERFORATED TYPE Ia. THIS IS ONE OF THE SCARCEST AND MOST DESIRABLE TYPES OF THE ISSUE.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spacing between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

Ex Sheriff (on cover) and Vineyard. With 2011 P.S.E. certificate (XF 90; SMQ $35,600.00). Only three have graded higher and only two others have equaled this grade

9,000
13,000
Back to Top
2012-10-23
The Nick Kirke Collection of Gem-Quality Used U.S. Stamps
3057
PSE 90
 
Sale Number 1032, Lot Number 3057, 1c-3c 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-26A)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 92R4, unusually choice centering for this difficult issue, wide margins which clearly show the type characteristics, deep rich color and proof-like impression, neat strikes of both red and black circular datestamps

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB USED EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 ONE-CENT PERFORATED TYPE Ia. THIS IS ONE OF THE SCARCEST AND MOST DESIRABLE TYPES OF THE ISSUE.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spacing between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

Illustrated in Neinken book on p. 280. With 2008 P.F. and P.S.E. certificates (XF 90; SMQ $37,800.00). Only three have graded higher, and only two have equaled this grade

10,000
16,000
Back to Top
2012-06-07
The Natalee Grace Collection of Used U.S. Stamps, Part One
53
PSE 90
 
Sale Number 1024, Lot Number 53, 1c 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-24)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 97R4, unusually choice centering for this difficult issue, wide and balanced margins, deep rich color and proof-like impression on bright paper, neat strike of large Boston "Paid" grid leaves the type's defining characteristics clearly visible

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB USED EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 ONE-CENT PERFORATED TYPE Ia. THIS IS ONE OF THE SCARCEST AND MOST DESIRABLE TYPES OF THE ISSUE.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spacing between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Positions 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Positions 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

Ashbrook states: "I consider perforated Type Ia stamps that are not touched by perforations as the rarest stamps in the 1857 perforated issue." (Neinken book, p. 279). The Scott Catalogue contains a footnote to the basic price quotes: "Copies of this stamp exist with perforations not touching the design at any point. Such copies command very high prices."

With 1998 P.F. and 2009 P.S.E. certificates (XF 90; SMQ $37,800.00). Only three have graded higher to date, including the famous Zoellner-Hinrichs copy with wide-spaced perforations which realized $330,000 hammer in our Tahoe sale (graded 98J).

10,000
27,000
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Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
80
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2017-09-19
The Clipper City Collection of Superb U.S. Stamps
20
PSE 80
 
Sale Number 1163, Lot Number 20, 1857-60 Issue (Scott 19-39)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Bottom row of Plate 4, rich color, nice bottom margin showing the key design characteristics, just in at top, light cancel leaves vignette fully visible, fresh and completely sound

VERY FINE USED EXAMPLE OF THE PERFORATED 1857 ONE-CENT TYPE Ia, WHICH CLEARLY SHOWS THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TYPE.

Type Ia was produced by only 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. Although Plate 4 was designed with sufficient space to accommodate perforations, the height of the top row and bottom row positions resulted in the perforations often cutting into the design at either top or bottom. This stamp shows nearly complete bottom scrolls and plumes.

Ex Gilbart. With 1976 and 2015 P.F. certificates (VF 80)

9,000
7,500
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
50
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2012-06-27
United States Stamps and Postal History, CSA, General Foreign
1165
PSE 50
 
Sale Number 1026, Lot Number 1165, 1857-60 Issue and 1875 Reprint (Scott 18-46)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Rich Plate 4 color, unobtrusive cancel, small thins at upper right and lower right

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE RARE PERFORATED ONE-CENT TYPE Ia.

With 2004 and 2009 P.S.E. certificates (VG 50; SMQ $2,750.00)

10,000
2,000
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
40
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2017-12-19
United States Stamps and Hawaii
516
PSE 40
 
Sale Number 1172, Lot Number 516, 1857-60 Issue & 1875 Reprint (Scott 19-46)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 97R4, deep rich color, cancelled by unusual small circular datestamp with "Belmont Sep" visible, a few scissors-blunted perfs at bottom right

FINE APPEARING USED EXAMPLE OF THE PERFORATED 1857 ONE-CENT TYPE Ia.

Type Ia was produced by only 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. Although Plate 4 was designed with sufficient space to accommodate perforations, the height of the top row and bottom row positions resulted in the perforations often cutting into the design at either top or bottom.

With 2007 and 2014 P.S.E. certificates (G-VG 40)

9,000
2,200
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
30
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2014-11-05
The Curtis Collection: 1847-1901 Stamps and Covers
3094
PSE 30
 
Sale Number 1084, Lot Number 3094, 1c 1857-60 Issue (Scott 18-24)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19), 1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 98L4, rich color, neat circular datestamp, corner crease at top right, small tears at upper left and bottom left, slightly shorter perf at bottom, otherwise Fine, an affordable example of this rare type, with 1994 P.F. and 2008 P.S.E. certificates (G 30), the former noting small repair at top left instead of tear

9,000
2,200
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