Sale 1238 — Civil War Special Mail Routes

Sale Date — Wednesday, 23 June, 2021

Category — Suspension of United States Postal Routes

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
220
c
Sale 1238, Lot 220, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesNew Bern N.C. May 21 (1861). Bold blue circular datestamp ties 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), perfectly centered, rich color, on small cover to Mrs. B. S. Hedrick at New York City street address, pencil forwarding address "Washington Patent Office D.C.", "New-York May 27" circular datestamp and "FORWARDED" straightline handstamp, manuscript "3" U.S. forwarding postage due

EXTREMELY FINE. A REMARKABLE COVER, POSTMARKED ON THE FIRST FULL DAY OF NORTH CAROLINA'S 7-DAY INDEPENDENT STATEHOOD AND CARRIED THROUGH RICHMOND ON MAY 23, THE LAST DAY THE MAIL ROUTE BETWEEN RICHMOND AND WASHINGTON D.C. REMAINED OPEN.

Northbound mail from the eastern Confederate States to the U.S. was normally carried via Richmond and Washington D.C. until May 23, 1861. The Federal military occupation of Alexandria, Virginia, closed this route on the evening of May 23, so northbound mail was diverted to the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office at Richmond from May 24 until June 1. The May 21 origin date in New Bern N.C. indicates transit through Richmond on May 23, the last day the route remained open. The addressee was the wife of Benjamin S. Hedrick, who was appointed 1st Assistant Examiner in the U.S. Patent Office on Apr. 10, 1861 (service record accompanies).

Illustrated in Confederate Philatelist (Jan.-Feb. 1994, pp. 29-30) and Special Routes book (p. 3). Ex Walske

E. 1,500-2,000
4,250
221
c
Sale 1238, Lot 221, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesLiverpool MY 18 61. Clearly struck circular datestamp and "19 Cents" debit handstamp on folded printed market report with letter and additional printed market report enclosure, addressed to D. H. London in Richmond Va., carried on the Cunarder America, departing Liverpool on May 11 and arriving in Boston on May 31, "Br. Pkt. Boston 1 Jun. 24" 24-cents due datestamp, diverted to the U.S. Dead Letter Office where "Dead Letter Office P.O. Dept. No. __ July 29" large oval datestamp was applied, blue "Baltimore Md. Jul. 30" circular datestamp on back and "Due 3" in circle handstamp on front for U.S. postage paid upon release to addressee (or his agent), slight age toning along edges

VERY FINE. A RARE TRANSATLANTIC LETTER FROM ENGLAND TO CONFEDERATE VIRGINIA, WHICH WAS DIVERTED TO THE UNITED STATES DEAD LETTER OFFICE AFTER THE WASHINGTON-RICHMOND MAIL ROUTE WAS SUSPENDED. ONLY THREE SUCH COVERS ARE REPORTED.

On April 27, 1861, the regular water route to Richmond was suspended by the United States government, leaving only the Orange & Alexandria Railroad open for mail via Richmond. The last route through Virginia was suspended on the evening of May 23. The cover offered here was received in Boston on May 31, then diverted to the U.S. Dead Letter Office and held there until called for on July 29. The 24c transatlantic postage plus an additional 3c was collected from the addressee or his agent when the letter was released.

The addressee, Daniel H. London, was a prominent Richmond merchant and pro-slavery, states' rights advocate, who served as president of the Southern Rights Association of Richmond. This letter and enclosures were sent by the British firm of Eyre Evans & Co.

Ex Dr. Green and Walske

E. 1,000-1,500
950
Back to Top
222
c
Sale 1238, Lot 222, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesBaton Rouge La. Jun. 1, 1861 -- First Day of the Confederate States Postal System. Mostly clear strike of circular datestamp with prominent date, "Paid" handstamp and manuscript "10" C.S.A. rate, crossed out in blue manuscript which also cancels and ties 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26) on yellow cover to Huntington (Long Island) N.Y., from the Waller correspondence, immaculate condition

EXTREMELY FINE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER POSTMARKED ON THE FIRST DAY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES POSTAL SYSTEM AND ADDRESSED TO THE NORTH, BEARING BOTH CONFEDERATE AND UNITED STATES POSTAGE FOR THE FIRST TIME POSSIBLE.

This cover was mailed from Baton Rouge on June 1, 1861 and reached Memphis on June 3, just three days before the U.S. suspended service at that post office. The 10c C.S.A. postage paid the over-500 miles rate, and the sender affixed the 3c 1857 stamp to pay U.S. postage once the letter crossed the border. This date -- June 1, 1861 -- is the earliest that postage of both sides could be used together in a mixed franking.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 13). Ex Everett, McCarren and Walske

E. 3,000-4,000
11,500
Back to Top
223
c
Sale 1238, Lot 223, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesPontotoc Miss. Jun. 8 (1861). Circular datestamp and manuscript "Paid 5 cts" C.S.A. rate on 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) to Henry White, New Haven Conn., with original enclosures (a letter and bill of exchange), the former datelined Pontotoc, Jun. 7, 1861, from a Stephen Daggett, who instructs his correspondent to "Request your post master to send your reply direct to the Louisville Ky. distributing Post office & it will probably reach me", Very Fine and early through-the-lines cover from Confederate Mississippi to Connecticut via Louisville; the suspension of Federal mail service to the South was ordered on May 27, 1861, and the Confederate postal system was inaugurated on June 1; during the first week of June there was considerable disruption in mail service, and, with the complete termination of mail between Louisville and Nashville by June 12, post offices were no longer permitted to carry mail across the lines; this cover from Pontotoc, mailed on June 8, was correctly prepaid to Nashville, probably arriving there on June 9-10 -- whether it slipped into the Federal mails at Louisville or was carried by an early through-the-lines express, we cannot say -- if carried by express, it might have been enclosed in an outer envelope for mailing at Louisville; if sent to Connecticut in the regular mails, it is possible that Louisville allowed some mail to go through without marking letters unpaid; a clue to the routing may lie in the sender's instructions to direct a reply to the Louisville distributing office and "it will probably reach me", Henry White's reply was in a cover in the Frank J. Engel sale catalogue (H. R. Harmer, May 17, 1976, lot 2700, shown here) -- as instructed by Stephen Daggett, Mr. White addressed his envelope "Via Louisville Ky. D.P.O.", but it was stopped in transit and sent to the Dead Letter Office on July 22 -- ex Roser and Gallagher, with 1998 P.F. certificate

Sale 1238, Lot 223, Suspension of United States Postal Routes
Image 2
E. 1,000-1,500
1,000
Back to Top
224
c
Sale 1238, Lot 224, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesNew Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED, AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read; in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have Postmaster's Provisional stamps (both New Orleans). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes census no. SLU-14. Illustrated in National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas, Ishikawa, Walske and "DK" Collection. With 2010 P.F. certificate

E. 50,000-75,000
145,000
Back to Top
225
c
Sale 1238, Lot 225, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp with matching "Louisville Ky. Jun. 27" double-circle datestamp on 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) to Hautes Pyrennes, France, "Bayou Chene La. Jun. 8" (1861) origination circular datestamp, "New York 3 Jul. 11" 3c debit datestamp also cancels entire, manuscript "Paid 15" obliterated by blue grid cancels, carried on the Cunarder Africa, departing New York on July 7, 1861, and arriving at Queenstown on July 13, red July 16 French double-circle arrival datestamp, bold "8" decimes due handstamp, four transit and receiving backstamps struck between July 16 and July 18.

VERY FINE. AN EXCEPTIONALLY CLEAR STRIKE OF THE "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" HANDSTAMP OF LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. ONE OF ONLY FIVE RECORDED COVERS WITH THIS MARKING ADDRESSED TO A FOREIGN DESTINATION.

The U.S. May 27, 1861, mail suspension order prohibited Federal post offices from forwarding southbound mail to Southern states in rebellion. However, northbound mail from the South continued to be sent to Louisville, Kentucky. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north.

With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters held at this date, Dr. Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating stamps by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp. There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book, including five foreign-bound covers, as follows:

1 To Prussia, Louisville June 27, three 10¢ No. 35, from St. Francisville La., ex Brown, J. D. Baker, Grunin, Ishikawa and Gross, offered in this sale as lot 226

2 To France, Louisville June 27, 3¢ U27, from Bayou Chene La., ex Wunsch and Myers (Sale 882, lot 2001), the cover offered here

3 To France, Louisville June 27, 3c and 12c Nos. 26 and 36B, from New Orleans, ex Shenfield, Sweet, Judd, Kilbourne and Walske (Sale 1119, lot 564)

4 To France, no Louisville datestamp, 3c and 12c Nos. 26 and 36B, from New Orleans to France, ex Antrim and Wishnietsky (Sale 1064, lot 23)

5 To England, Louisville July 11, 24c No. 37, from Petersburg Va., ex Matthies, Dr. Graves and Weill Brothers

Special Routes census no. SLU-5. Ex Wunsch and Myers. Signed Ashbrook. With 2004 P.F. certificate

E. 30,000-40,000
45,000
Back to Top
226
c
Sale 1238, Lot 226, Suspension of United States Postal Routes10c Green, Type V (35). Three slightly overlapping singles, uncancelled at originating post office in St. Francisville in the West Feliciana Parish of Louisiana, "St. Francisville La. Jun. 8" (1861) circular datestamp and "10" in circle Confederate rate handstamp on buff cover addressed to Adolf Raphael in Breslau, Prussia, received at Louisville post office on or about June 14 and held by postmaster Dr. J. J. Speed pending instructions from U.S. Post Office Department, stamps cancelled by blue "SOUTHN. LETTER/ UNPAID" two-line handstamp, matching blue "Louisville Ky. Jun. 27" double-circle datestamp with grid cancel struck over "10" rate, matching "30" in circle due handstamp for Prussian Closed Mail rate to Germany (based on postage affixed) but routed via Hamburg at New York foreign-mail office, part strike of "N. York Hamb. Pkt. 5 Jun. 29" 5c debit datestamp for 15c Bremen-Hamburg rate -- carried from New York on Hamburg-American Line Bavaria, departing June 29, 1861, and arriving at Hamburg July 14 -- large blue manuscript "6-1/2" and "6-1/2" blue handstamped rates in silbergroschen, Hamburg (July 14) and Breslau (July 15 and 16) backstamps, center 10c stamp has small negligible repair and cover with mended edge at top not affecting stamps or markings, top backflap removed

THE ONLY RECORDED "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" COVER TO GERMANY AND ONE OF FIVE ADDRESSED TO COUNTRIES OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES. AN OUTSTANDING ARTIFACT OF THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR.

The U.S. May 27, 1861, mail suspension order prohibited Federal post offices from forwarding southbound mail to Southern states in rebellion. However, northbound mail from the South continued to be sent to Louisville, Kentucky. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north.

With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters held at this date, Dr. Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating stamps by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp. There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book, including five foreign-bound covers, as follows:

1 To Prussia, Louisville June 27, three 10c No. 35, from St. Francisville La., ex Brown, J. D. Baker, Grunin, Ishikawa and Gross, the cover offered here

2 To France, Louisville June 27, 3c U27, from Bayou Chene La., ex Wunsch and Myers (Sale 882, lot 2001), the cover offered in this sale as lot 225

3 To France, Louisville June 27, 3c and 12c Nos. 26 and 36B, from New Orleans, ex Shenfield, Sweet, Judd, Kilbourne and Walske (Sale 1119, lot 564)

4 To France, no Louisville datestamp, 3c and 12c Nos. 26 and 36B, from New Orleans to France, ex Antrim and Wishnietsky (Sale 1064, lot 23)

5 To England, Louisville July 11, 24c No. 37, from Petersburg Va., ex Matthies, Dr. Graves and Weill Brothers

This cover was mailed from St. Francisville, Louisiana, on June 8, 1861, and reached Nashville after the regular mail route to Louisville had been terminated. It was brought across the lines by express and placed in the Louisville post office on or about June 14. It was among the thousands of letters from the South that had accumulated while Dr. Speed awaited instructions from Washington. Observing the 30c postage, the Louisville clerk applied a 30c handstamp, which was the Prussian Closed Mail rate for a half-ounce letter. However, the New York foreign-mail office disregarded the 30c marking and postage, and sent it on the Hamburg-American Line steamer for Hamburg. It was rated with a 5c debit marking for the U.S. share of postage, and in Germany the 6-1/4 silbergroschen markings were applied to indicate the total amount due.

Special Routes census no. SLU-4. Illustrated in Ashbrook The United States Ten Cent Stamp of 1855-1857, pp. 79-0, fig. 54; The United States One Cent Stamp of 1851-1857, 1938 edition, Vol. 2, pp. 33-34 and fig. 35D; Bakers' U.S. Classics, p. 233; Graham "Postal History and Stamps: A Colorful Combination, 1847-1861," The American Philatelist, April 1978.

Ex Brown, J. David Baker, Grunin, Ishikawa and Gross. With 1993 P.F. certificate

E. 30,000-40,000
37,500
Back to Top
227
c
Sale 1238, Lot 227, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesDead Letter Office P.O. Dept. No. -- July 15, 1861. Large bold oval datestamp with "DUE 3cts." straightline, 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26) tied by "Carlisle Ky. Jun. 10" circular datestamp on cover to Confederate Governor of Texas, Thomas Lubbock, at Houston, sender's routing "Via Nashville Ten.", attempted through-the-lines mailing from Kentucky to Texas, D.L.O. identifies sender at left "Thos. S. Morgan, Carlisle, Kentucky", 3c minor corner crease

VERY FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE NORTHERN DEAD LETTER OFFICE MARKING APPLIED TO SOUTHBOUND MAIL AFTER SUSPENSION OF THE MAILS. ONE OF ONLY A FEW RECORDED WITH THE LARGE OVAL DATESTAMP ON MAIL ORIGINATING IN KENTUCKY.

After Postmaster General Blair's May 27 order prohibiting mail from the North to disloyal Southern States, the mails between Louisville and Nashville continued until June 12. This cover was sent by Thomas S. Morgan, later a captain in the Confederate army, to the Confederate Governor of Texas, but it was stopped -- probably at Louisville -- and sent to the Washington D.C. Dead Letter Office. The envelope was opened to identify the sender, then it was returned to him postage due.

Thomas S. Morgan was not related to John Hunt Morgan, the celebrated Confederate raider, but he is mentioned on page 193 of Rebel Raider by James A. Ramage (1986, The University Press of Kentucky). Thomas S. Morgan's sister, Lucy Dorsey, visited him in a prison hospital at Camp Chase one day prior to John Hunt Morgan's escape. Days later she wrote to her grandfather and used words suggesting a coded message of hope for Morgan's safe journey home. As the historian Ramage observes, "There is no proof that Lucy aided the escape, but she may have delivered messages or money through her brother, who was not one of the escapees."

E. 2,000-3,000
9,000
Back to Top
228
c
Sale 1238, Lot 228, Suspension of United States Postal Routes1861 July 11--Suspended Mail Route to Fort Buchanan, Sent to U.S. Dead Letter Office. "Corning N.Y. Jul. 11, 1861" circular datestamp on cover addressed to Orville G. Irvine in Fort Buchanan "Care of Boyle & Marshall Esq.", signed and free franked by his father, U.S. Representative William Irvine, "Dead Letter Office P.O. Dept. No. -- Nov. 23, 1861" oval datestamp (release date) struck on back and "DUE 3cts." straightline, reduced at left, otherwise Very Fine, Fort Buchanan was burned and abandoned by Union troops in July 1861 -- this might have been sent back from San Francisco (the Central Route was open in July 1861) or sent directly to the Dead Letter Office without traveling west--a unique Civil War use, ex Birkinbine

E. 1,000-1,500
1,700
Back to Top
229
c
Sale 1238, Lot 229, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesSENT BACK TO ENGLAND/WITHOUT A REASON/FOR NON-DELIVERY. Red three-line handstamp without frame perfectly struck by the British Post Office on blue legal-size cover to Charleston S.C., "Edinburgh JY 6 '61" origination datestamp, "New-York Am. Pkt. Jul. 24 48" debit datestamp, manuscript "d3" and "6" (crossed out) manuscript rates and "3 Cents" handstamp, London transit backstamp, some minor edge tears and nicks, an Extremely Fine strike of this rare marking, by the time this cover from England reached New York, the mail routes between North and South had been suspended and mail from foreign countries was returned, in England the three-line "Sent Back to England" handstamp was applied to returned letters

E. 1,000-1,500
2,200
Back to Top
230
c
Sale 1238, Lot 230, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesMobile Ala. May 30, 1861. Double-circle datestamp ties 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26) on buff cover to New York City, with enclosed printed notice from Lloyd Bowers, the Mobile Postmaster, dated May 28, 1861, regarding prepayment of U.S. and Confederate postage on domestic and foreign letters, states (in part): "...mail matter for the United States and other foreign countries will be forwarded to its address upon payment of the Confederacy postage, in money, and the foreign postage in United States stamps...", a fascinating reference to the U.S. as a "foreign" country, edgewear causing rounded corner in stamp, still Very Fine, the makings of an outstanding exhibition page, ex Dr. Brandon

E. 750-1,000
1,100
Back to Top
231
c
Sale 1238, Lot 231, Suspension of United States Postal Routes"Turner's Point Texas, June 19th". Manuscript postmark on blue folded letter datelined "Kaufman County Texas June 15th 1861" from a young man eager to join the Confederate army to his cousin at Clifton Mills in Breckinridge County in northwestern Kentucky, no indication of C.S.A. rate or prepaid postage, blue "Paducah Ky." double-circle datestamp struck on three different days -- Aug. 29, 30 and Sep. 3, 1861 -- matching "Due 3" in oval, one strike crossed out, a second strike at upper right, minor wear along folds expertly reinforced

A REMARKABLE ACROSS-THE-LINES COVER FROM TEXAS, POSTMARKED AT PADUCAH ON THE EVE OF THE CONFEDERATE INVASION OF KENTUCKY AND THREE DAYS PRIOR TO FEDERAL OCCUPATION UNDER ULYSSES S. GRANT.

Kaufman County, Texas, lies just east of Dallas. Four days after the letter's June 15 dateline, it was postmarked at Turner's Point, also in Kaufman County. The letter made its way to the Mississippi River, probably by a courier, then it was carried up river to Paducah, Kentucky.

Although Kentucky remained neutral at this time, Paducah had strong pro-Southern elements, and its post office was closed by U.S. authorities on August 30. This letter was postmarked first on August 29, then again on August 30, and finally a third time on September 3, the day Confederate forces moved on Hickman and Columbus, Kentucky, which effectively ended the state's neutrality policy.

On the morning of September 6, some 4,000 Confederate troops moved from Columbus toward Paducah with the intention of taking this key river port. However, Ulysses S. Grant entered Paducah that morning with a small detachment of troops and proclaimed Federal control. The Confederates were unaware of their own superior strength and turned back from Paducah after hearing of Grant's occupation. To reassure citizens who were predominantly pro-Southern and deeply suspicious of the Union army's presence, Grant issued an eloquent proclamation that earned him the people's confidence and his superiors' praise.

This cover was carried on the Memphis and Paducah Railroad, linking western Tennessee and western Kentucky. This route was not suspended until August 30. Very little mail was carried on this route, and very few covers survive.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 18). Ex Gallagher and Walske

E. 3,000-4,000
5,000
Back to Top
232
c
Sale 1238, Lot 232, Suspension of United States Postal Routes3c Rose (65). Cancelled by blue grid, matching "Louisville Ky. Jan. 18, 1862" double-circle datestamp, bold "DUE 5" C.S.A. rate in oval handstamp applied on arrival on buff cover to Marion Kentucky, stamp has minor gum stains, slightly reduced at top and small piece of flap missing, otherwise Very Fine, a rare example of mail exchanged between U.S. and Confederate post offices in Kentucky, Marion was in Crittenden County, an area occupied by Nathan Bedford Forrest's troops -- this cover from Louisville traveled through the U.S. mails but was marked "Due 5" for Confederate postage upon receipt at Marion -- illustrated in Dietz book, ex Gallagher

E. 750-1,000
2,200
Back to Top
233
c
Sale 1238, Lot 233, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesMissouri to Confederate Arkansas. 3c Red Nesbitt entire (U9) to a Dr. Snyder in Camden Ark., clear "Bolivar Mo. Apr. 30" (1861) circular datestamp and additional "Camden Ark. Jun. 5" circular datestamp with manuscript "For./5 due" at left, waterstains at right, otherwise Fine, a very rare and unusual combination of U.S. and Confederate rates before and after the start of the Confederate postal system on June 1, 1861, the cover is not redirected to another post office so presumably the forwarding notation indicates that the U.S. 3c postage was not recognized in the Confederacy and that Dr. Snyder's mail was held pending his return or a new address, ex Felton and Powell

E. 500-750
1,600
Back to Top
234
c
Sale 1238, Lot 234, Suspension of United States Postal RoutesDead Letter Office, Confederate States of America, Aug. 30, 1861. Clear strike of oval datestamp with magenta manuscript "M-116-1" record notation on 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) to New York City, "Wilmington N.C. May 11" (day inverted) circular datestamp clearly struck on embossed stamp, repaired opening tears at top

FINE APPEARANCE. A RARE EXAMPLE OF THE CONFEDERATE DEAD LETTER OFFICE HANDSTAMP ON A COVER DIVERTED AFTER THE MAIL ROUTE BETWEEN RICHMOND AND WASHINGTON D.C. WAS TERMINATED.

Northbound mail from the eastern Confederate States to the U.S. was normally carried via Richmond and Washington D.C. until May 23, 1861. The Federal military occupation of Alexandria, Virginia, closed this route on the evening of May 23, so northbound mail was diverted to the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office at Richmond from May 24 until June 1.

Fewer than ten examples of the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office marking (either type) are known. This cover is very unusual, because it originated in North Carolina before the state delegates voted for secession on May 20. It was mailed on May 11, well before the route between Richmond and Washington D.C. was closed. As a U.S. Post Office letter, it should not have been diverted to the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office. The Dead Letter Office marking is dated the day of release (August 30). Although earlier D.L.O. dates are recorded, the May 11 origin date is probably the earliest for a cover diverted to the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office.

Ex Judd and Dr. Brandon

E. 3,000-4,000
4,500
Back to Top
235
c
Sale 1238, Lot 235, Suspension of United States Postal Routes"P.O.D. Dead Letter Office, 28 Aug. 1861 J-5-1". Confederate States Dead Letter Office marking and record number in bright red manuscript, "Charleston S.C. May 25, 1861" double-circle datestamp on 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) to J. M. Jeannerett in New York City, pencil "P.O. Draft" denoting contents which must have been returned to sender, expertly restored along edges with small part of double-circle datestamp drawn in

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE CONFEDERATE DEAD LETTER OFFICE COVER WITH THE MANUSCRIPT MARKING, WHICH WAS USED CONCURRENTLY WITH THE HANDSTAMPED OVAL FOR APPPROXIMATELY TEN DAYS AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WAR.

Once the mail routes between the U.S. and C.S.A. were suspended, northbound mail was diverted to the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office. Fewer than ten examples of the C.S.A. Dead Letter Office markings (handstamp or manuscript) are reported, all diverted to the D.L.O. between May 24 and June 1, 1861.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 12). Ex Calhoun

E. 2,000-3,000
3,750
Back to Top