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Sale 1238 — Civil War Special Mail Routes

Sale Date — Wednesday, 23 June, 2021

Leave Absentee BidsLIVE INTERNET BIDDING
*A buyer’s premium of 18% of the winning bid will be added as part of the total purchase price on all lots in this sale. Buyers are responsible for applicable sales tax, customs duty and any other prescribed charges. By placing a bid you agree to the terms and conditions of sale.

Category — Trans-Mississippi Express Mail

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
316
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 316, Trans-Mississippi Express MailJ. M. Barksdale's Arkansas Express, J. M. Barksdale's Arkansas ExpressJ. M. Barksdale's Arkansas Express. Blue manuscript "Paid $1.00" express rate with matching endorsement "Soldier's Letter, A. E. Spence, Co. `B' 1st Ark. Regt." on cover to Arkadelphia Ark., "Washington Ark. Dec. 2" circular datestamp and "10" due handstamp, minor soiling and slightly reduced at left where opened roughly

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS ONE OF ONLY FOUR RECORDED COVERS CARRIED BY ONE OF THE ARKANSAS EXPRESSES ACROSS THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER.

This cover was incorrectly described by us as an E. W. Black's Express cover in Sale 810 (lot 2412). This and a similar cover (ex Walske, Sale 988, lot 282) were reattributed to J. M. Barksdale after 2006. The sender, Capt. Alexander E. Spence, served in Company B (Clark County Volunteers), 1st Arkansas Infantry. Spence was promoted to captain on January 20, 1863. The expressman, J. M. Barksdale, enlisted on Aug. 4, 1861, at Crane Creek, Missouri, and served in Company H, 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles. He was wounded on Mar. 7, 1862, at Elk Horn, Arkansas, and discharged on Dec. 17, 1862.

The Barksdale Express began operating no later than the summer of 1863 and was still carrying mail in late 1864. Barksdale carried mail from Arkansas soldiers in Reynolds' Arkansas Brigade to Washington, Arkansas, where they were posted in the Confederate mail. The express charge for a letter to Arkansas (westbound) was $1.00, as noted on the cover offered here. Mail from Arkansas to the soldiers (eastbound) was apparently carried free.

Bid on this lot

E. 1,500-2,000
Future Sale
317
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 317, Trans-Mississippi Express MailSpence Correspondence, Spence CorrespondenceSpence Correspondence. Two folded covers and one buff envelope from the Spence correspondence to Arkadelphia, each cover properly endorsed, two sent by A. E. Spence, Captain in Co. B, 1st Ark. Regt., one with "Little Rock Ark." double-circle datestamp and manuscript "Due 5", other with manuscript "Due 10" and sender's instructions: "If the Federals have possession of Arkadelphia P.M. will please forward this to Dr. B. P. Jeff Washington Ark who will please forward this to the person addressed if he knows his whereabouts & much oblige. A. E. Spence", third cover endorsed by T. F. Spence, McIntosh Regt., with pencil "Pleasant Hill Ark. Mar. /62" postmark and "Due 5", minor edge faults, Very Fine and rare group of Confederate Arkansas uses, from the same correspondence as the Barksdale's Express cover offered in the previous lot

Bid on this lot

E. 500-750
Future Sale
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318
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 318, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing ExpressE. H. Cushing Express. Black on blue newsprint label, C.S.A. Catalog Type A (without date) and Special Routes book Ty. I, affixed to back of cover originating in Texas (probably Austin), addressed to E. L. Stickney, care of Dr. J. C. Stickney, Medical Purveyor, Okolona Miss. and forwarded to Chattanooga Tenn., horizontal pair of 5c Green, Stone 1-2 (1), ample to large margins, tied by matching manuscript strokes, faint strike of "Liberty Miss." circular datestamp where it entered the mails, also "Okolona Miss. Aug. 13" forwarding datestamp with manuscript "Due 10", label has some slight toning from adhesive, opened on three sides for display, slight edgewear affects 5c stamps which have small toned spots

VERY FINE EXAMPLE OF THE RAREST TYPE OF THE CUSHING'S TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS LABELS. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE USED ON FORWARDED MAIL.

Edward Hopkins Cushing, publisher of the Houston Daily Telegraph, commenced his express service after New Orleans fell to Federal forces in April 1862. In an effort to improve communications between Texas regiments in the East and their relations at home, as well as secure safe lines for news transmission, Cushing established routes with pony riders and other means of conveyance necessary to cross the Federal lines. Cushing’s agents affixed labels to envelopes carried by express, usually on the backs. These were intended to inform patrons and advertise the service. Approximately 20 examples (of all varieties) are believed to exist. This type is much rarer than the larger labels.

This label the illustration in the C.S.A. Catalog and the Special Routes book. Ex Powell. With 1976 C.S.A. certificate

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 318, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing Express
Image 2
E. 10,000-15,000
Future Sale
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319
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 319, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing ExpressE. H. Cushing Express. Black on white newsprint label, C.S.A. Catalog Type B (without date) and Special Routes book Ty. II, affixed to back of buff cover originating in Texas and addressed to H. M. Alford in Richmond Va., vertical pair of 5c Blue, Local (7), ample margins to just touching, tied by "Jackson Miss. Nov. 3" (ca. 1862-63) circular datestamp, label torn slightly at lower right, cover opened on three sides for display

VERY FINE. AN UNUSUALLY CLEAN AND CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE RARE CUSHING TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS TYPE II LABEL.

Edward Hopkins Cushing, publisher of the Houston Daily Telegraph, commenced his express service after New Orleans fell to Federal forces in April 1862. In an effort to improve communications between Texas regiments in the East and their relations at home, as well as secure safe lines for news transmission, Cushing established routes with pony riders and other means of conveyance necessary to cross the Federal lines. Cushing’s agents affixed labels to envelopes carried by express, usually on the backs. These were intended to inform patrons and advertise the service. Approximately 20 examples (of all varieties) are believed to exist.

The addressee, H. M. Alford, was a private in the 6th Texas Regiment, Company G, "Travis Rifles." The only time this regiment was near Richmond was in May 1863 during the C.S.A.'s defense of the capital against U.S. forces and the bloody Battle of Chancellorsville.

Ex Dr. Green. With 2000 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 319, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing Express
Image 2
E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
320
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 320, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing ExpressE. H. Cushing Express. Black on white newsprint label, C.S.A. Catalog Type B (without date) and Special Routes book Ty. II, affixed to back of cover originating west of the Mississippi River and addressed to Gainestown Ala., horizontal pair of 5c Blue, Local (7), large margins, affixed over corner card and tied by indistinct "Jackson Miss." (ca. 1862-63) circular datestamp, label is in excellent condition with one small inconsequential hole, cover has replaced side flap and repaired lower left corner

AN ATTRACTIVE AND VERY CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE RARE CUSHING TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS TYPE II LABEL.

Edward Hopkins Cushing, publisher of the Houston Daily Telegraph, commenced his express service after New Orleans fell to Federal forces in April 1862. In an effort to improve communications between Texas regiments in the East and their relations at home, as well as secure safe lines for news transmission, Cushing established routes with pony riders and other means of conveyance necessary to cross the Federal lines. Cushing’s agents affixed labels to envelopes carried by express, usually on the backs. These were intended to inform patrons and advertise the service. Approximately 20 examples (of all varieties) are believed to exist.

Ex Finney, Castillejos ("Camina"), Seacrest and Dr. Agre. With 2000 P.S.E. certificate

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 320, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing Express
Image 2
E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
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321
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 321, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing ExpressE. H. Cushing Express. Black on white newsprint label, C.S.A. Catalog Type B (without date) and Special Routes book Ty. II, affixed to back of cover originating west of the Mississippi River (likely in Texas) and addressed to Cooksville Miss., two horizontal pairs of 5c Blue, Local (7), ample to large margins, cancelled by matching manuscript strokes, label has small scuffs at center but is intact and in good condition, cover opened on three sides for display, slight wear and small mend at corner

VERY FINE EXAMPLE OF THE RARE CUSHING TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS TYPE II LABEL.

Edward Hopkins Cushing, publisher of the Houston Daily Telegraph, commenced his express service after New Orleans fell to Federal forces in April 1862. In an effort to improve communications between Texas regiments in the East and their relations at home, as well as secure safe lines for news transmission, Cushing established routes with pony riders and other means of conveyance necessary to cross the Federal lines. Cushing’s agents affixed labels to envelopes carried by express, usually on the backs. These were intended to inform patrons and advertise the service. Approximately 20 examples (of all varieties) are believed to exist.

Ex Frazier and Walske

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 321, Trans-Mississippi Express MailE. H. Cushing Express, E. H. Cushing Express
Image 2
E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
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322
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 322, Trans-Mississippi Express MailArthur H. Edey's Express, Arthur H. Edey's ExpressArthur H. Edey's Express. Black on white newsprint label "FORWARDED BY/ARTHUR H. EDEY, Agent, Fifth Reg't Texas Volunteers." affixed to upper right corner of oatmeal cover originating from Captain Tacitus T. Clay, 5th Texas Regiment, Robertson's Brigade, Hood's Division, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, to his wife, Betty Clay, at Independence Texas, probably mailed just prior to the Battle of Antietam (Sep. 17, 1862) and carried by Edey to Marshall Texas where it entered the mails with pair 5c Blue, Local (7), tied by bold grids with "Marshall Tex. Sep. 22" (1862) double-circle datestamp which ties the Edey label, right stamp pre-use crease, cover opened a bit roughly at right and with minor toning

ONE OF EIGHT RECORDED COVERS WITH THE EDEY LABEL, OF WHICH HALF ARE AFFIXED TO THE BACKS. THIS IS THE ONLY EXAMPLE OF AN EDEY LABEL TIED ON A COVER. EDEY'S EXPRESS OPERATED BRIEFLY FROM JUNE UNTIL LATE OCTOBER 1862.

Arthur H. Edey enlisted as a Private in Co. A, 5th Regiment, Texas Infantry, on July 19, 1861, at Houston. He was detailed as agent for the regiment in Richmond on Feb. 7, 1862, and in that capacity provided mail service between members of the regiment serving east of the Mississippi and their correspondents back home. Edey was wounded and captured at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, and sent to Fort Wood, New York Harbor. He was paroled on April 15, 1865.

Our records contain eight examples of Edey's label, including a few heavily stained or defective covers. This cover was sent by Tacitus T. Clay, who was promoted to captain in the 5th Texas Regiment in October 1861 and served as acting lieutenant-colonel and colonel at various times during 1863 and 1864. Clay was wounded at Gaines' Mill, the Wilderness, and Darbytown Road -- as a result of his injuries at Darbytown, Clay's leg was amputated.

Ex Corwin. With 2002 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 10,000-15,000
Future Sale
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323
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 323, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Greenish Blue, Die A (11c), 10c Greenish Blue, Die A (11c)10c Greenish Blue, Die A (11c). Three margins, in at bottom, creased, tied by "Nacogdoches Tex. Jan. 28" (1864) circular datestamp on cover originating in Jasper County, Georgia, and addressed to A. R. Hockersmith in Union-held Benton, Arkansas, carried westward across the Mississippi River by a Confederate courier (manuscript "Sent by H. M. Henley" on backflap), entered Confederate mails at Nacogdoches and sent to Camden Ark. where exchanged under flag-of-truce, manuscript "Ex & appd. Maj. W. Percy, Comdg Post" examiner's endorsement applied on arrival at Benton, with original letter dated Nov. 29, 1863, minor stain spots and folds in cover

FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE -- POSSIBLY UNIQUE -- TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COVER FROM GEORGIA TO ARKANSAS VIA TEXAS. AFTER CROSSING THE MISSISSIPPI, THIS COVER WAS EXCHANGED BY FLAG-OF-TRUCE, EXAMINED BY A UNION OFFICER AND DELIVERED TO THE ADDRESSEE IN BENTON, ARKANSAS.

The writer of this letter is Captain Alfred C. Hockersmith, Company F, 1st (Colquitt's) Regiment, Arkansas Infantry. He writes to his uncle, Alfred H. Hockersmith in U.S.-occupied Benton, Arkansas, and describes his company's part in the Battle of Chickamauga, taking a ball through the eye, other casualties, amputations and mention of Gen. Bragg fighting and retreating to Dalton.

Ex Clippert and Walske.

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
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324
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 324, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Blue, Die B (12), 10c Blue, Die B (12)10c Blue, Die B (12). Large margins except clipped into design at bottom right, tied by "Shreveport La. Jul. 16, 1864" double-circle datestamp on folded letter from T. Lacy, a soldier with the 3rd Texas Cavalry (Hood's Brigade) "To Home Folks" at San Cosina Tex., datelined "In Camp, Marietta, Georgia, June 21st, 1864" and tiny manuscript "Paid $1.00" next to stamp indicates Trans-Mississippi courier fee, letter written in pencil but very readable and fascinating, includes description of casualties, prediction that "Johnson is anxious for Sherman to make the attack & I think will force him to do it yet", remorse over Gen. Polk's death (killed June 14), long commentary on Grant's campaign, "Grant seems to be preparing for another attempt at an 'on to Richmond'", and the consequences of losing Richmond, mention of cousins who "were prisoners at Fort Pillow when Forrest attacked the place. The enemy forced them to carry ammunition to their men in the ditches. Ben was killed & Crocket wounded"; the writer even includes a colorful remark about a relative made Provost Marshal -- "Not much to do & a plenty of nice Ladies to pass off the time with. He can't afford to take a 'ride' there, but will wait until he can get back to his native state.", minor toning, Fine and very rare use, Trans-Mississippi courier covers rarely show the express charge or contain such a lengthy war letter, ex Keeling and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 750-1,000
Future Sale
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325
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 325, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Blue, Die A (11), 10c Blue, Die A (11)10c Blue, Die A (11). Massive margins to full at right, tied by "Shreveport La. Feb. 18" double-circle datestamp on Trans-Mississippi courier cover to New Salem Tex., manuscript "Soldiers letter 19th La." and "Favor of Mr. Aills", missing part of backflap, Very Fine and scarce use of the 10c Engraved, while this does not have contents identifying the origin or a manuscript indication of Trans-Mississippi carriage, it very likely originated in the East, was carried across the river and entered the C.S.A. mails at Shreveport for delivery to Texas, during brief research on this we located a Thomas P. Aills, who, served in the 14th Texas Infantry in General Walker's Division, Trans- Mississippi Department (Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865), there was also a George W. Aills in he 19th Louisiana Infantry

Bid on this lot

E. 400-500
Future Sale
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326
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 326, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Greenish Blue, Die A (11c), 10c Greenish Blue, Die A (11c)10c Greenish Blue, Die A (11c). Horizontal pair, mostly large margins, tied by partly readable Shreveport La. double-circle datestamp on Trans-Mississippi courier folded letter datelined "Richmond Va., Oct. 13, 1863", to Fairland Tex., interesting contents with directions for getting mail across the river by Capt. F. J. Lynch who "swims across with his mule," edges toned and some splitting or nicks along folds, otherwise Fine, ex Clippert

Bid on this lot

E. 500-750
Future Sale
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327
 
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 327, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail5c Blue, Local (7), 5c Blue, Local (7)5c Blue, Local (7). Contiguous "C" shaped strip of seven and horizontal strip of three, large margins to slightly in, small faults, tied by multiple strikes of brownish-black "Black Hawk Miss." dateless circle handstamp on westbound Trans-Mississippi 50c "Preferred Mail" rate cover front only to Miss Mary E. Compton in Chappel Hill, Washington County, Texas, backflaps have been masterfully added to restore this front to envelope form, pressed crease (affecting two stamps), repaired tear in cover (does not affect the stamps)

A REMARKABLE FRANKING PAYING THE 50-CENT "PREFERRED MAIL" RATE THAT WAS ANNOUNCED IN APRIL 1863 AND SUPERSEDED BY THE 40-CENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS MAIL RATE ONE MONTH LATER.

On April 16, 1863, Congress authorized a "preferred" mail service to be established by the Post Office Department to maintain communication across the Mississippi River, and to provide for "more speedy transmission of letters and dispatches." The rate in the statute was set at 50c per half ounce, and preferential handling was to be given to such mails. Although Jaronski found records of at least eight mail carrying trips undertaken by C.S.A. military officers in 1863, only five surviving "Preferred Mail" rate covers are known, all westbound.

Black Hawk, Mississippi, lies about 90 miles north of Brandon, where mail accumulated for westbound express runs across the Mississippi River. Very few examples of Confederate mail postmarked at Black Hawk are known (this and a larger dateless circle are recorded). Based on the use of the 5c Local (Richmond) print, it seems likely that this was used in early 1863, prior to the October 1863 "Express" period (for which the 40c rate was intended). Of the five "Preferred Mail" covers recorded, this cover, although undated, is considered to be the earliest.

Illustrated in Krieger book (no. E50) and Special Routes (p. 103). Ex Everett, Birkinbine and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 5,000-7,500
Future Sale
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328
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 328, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail20c Green, Horizontal Half Used as 10c (13d), 20c Green, Horizontal Half Used as 10c (13d)20c Green, Horizontal Half Used as 10c (13d). Bottom half used with full 20c Green (13) and 10c Blue, Die A (11), each with clear to full margins, 10c small corner crease, the 20c bisect and single are tied together by "Alexandria La. Oct. 17" (1864) circular datestamp, rim of datestamp used to lightly cancel 10c stamp on buff eastbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to Mrs. C. M. Dent at Livingston Ala., entered the mails at Alexandria, then carried east across the Mississippi River and on to Alabama, backflap removed

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED FULL COVER WITH A 20-CENT BISECT USED TO PAY PART OF THE 40-CENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS RATE. ONE OF THE GREATEST GENERAL ISSUE COVERS EXTANT.

On May 1, 1863, the C.S.A. Congress once again considered the question of the Trans-Mississippi mails. It authorized the C.S.A. Postmaster General to establish an "Express Mail" along post routes and at rates to be designated by him. Under this authority, the PMG Reagan established an express mail rate of 40c per half ounce, and hired a contractor to carry the express mails twice weekly on October 20, 1863. An August 1, 1863, C.S.A. Post Office advertisement placed in newspapers on the western side of the river gave directions for the routing of Trans-Mississippi mails. All eastbound communications were to be addressed to their proper destination, care of the postmasters at Shreveport, Louisiana, or Camden, Arkansas. The mails were to be forwarded by carriers designated by the Post Office Special Agents.

A letter written by August Dietz (quoted previously but no longer with the cover) presents a scenario that this cover was brought to the post office with the 10c stamp affixed by the sender in the upper right corner. When the decision was made to use the more reliable Trans-Mississippi Express service, the additional postage was applied by the postal clerk, using a 20c stamp and half of another to make up the 40c rate. The C.S.A. Post Office Department had difficulty keeping offices west of the Mississippi supplied with stamps, which explains the disproportionately greater use of 20c bisects in that region. Another cover (front) from this correspondence, bearing a strip of 10c postmarked at Alexandria on February 10, 1865, is listed in the Krieger census (No. W18).

Illustrated in Krieger book (No. W15) and Special Routes (p. 109). Ex Myerson and Walske. With 1973 and 2006 P.F. certificates

Bid on this lot

E. 10,000-15,000
Future Sale
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329
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 329, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail5c Blue, Local (7), 5c Blue, Local (7)5c Blue, Local (7). Eight stamps comprising strip of three, two pairs and single, margins to slightly in, rich color, uncancelled and affixed to back of eastbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover with comprehensive address for routing: "Capt. J. A. Formwalt, Comds. Co. In 6th, 10th, and 15th Texas Regiments, Smith's Brigade, Cleburn's Division, Hardee's Corps, Johnson's Army" and routing "Via Shreveport La.", confirmation of 40c prepayment "Postage on opposite side", opened for display, minor wear

VERY FINE. A MOST UNUSUAL COVER FROM THE FORMWALT CORRESPONDENCE, FRANKED FOR THE GOVERNMENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS BUT CARRIED BY ANDERSON'S PRIVATE EXPRESS.

The letter from Mrs. Formwalt that was contained in this cover (which no longer accompanies) is datelined at Lonely Cottage, Texas, on March 31, 1864, and states that she is sending this letter and $1.00 to Mr. Anderson, who is waiting at Fairfield, Texas, for letters to take east.

At the start of the Civil War, Maj. Formwalt enlisted as a private in Capt. William Shannon's company and was soon promoted to captain in command of his own company in Col. Nelson's 10th Regiment Texas Infantry. Maj. Formwalt was captured on January 11, 1862, at Arkansas Post, and imprisoned at Columbus, Ohio, for five months. After he was exchanged he joined the Army of the Tennessee. At the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, in November 1864, Formwalt, as a senior captain, was wounded while leading his regiment in the charge. Shortly after he was promoted to the rank of major.

Illustrated in Krieger book (No. W7) and shown on the back cover of that publication. Ex Corwin and Walske. Accompanying 1974 C.S.A. certificate notes "Probably carried privately rather than by C.S.A. postal system".

Bid on this lot

E. 1,500-2,000
Future Sale
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330
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 330, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail5c Blue, Local (7), 5c Blue, Local (7)5c Blue, Local (7). Block of four, ample margins to slightly in, pre-use creases, slight stains and small faults, manuscript cancels, paying 20c of 40c Trans-Mississippi Express rate with manuscript "Due 20" on eastbound cover to "Col. W. B. Whitehead, Mossingford, Charlotte County, By the way of Shrievesport, Va.", slightly toned

FINE APPEARANCE. AN EXTRAORDINARILY RARE FRANKING FOR THE 40-CENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS RATE, COMBINING A BLOCK OF THE 5-CENT RICHMOND PRINT WITH A "DUE 20" MARKING.

The use of the 5c Local (Richmond) print from west of the Mississippi points to an 1863 mailing.

Unlisted in Krieger. Ex MacBride and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
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331
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 331, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Blue, Die A (11), 10c Blue, Die A (11)10c Blue, Die A (11). Block of four, large margins all around, each cancelled by two neat parallel penstrokes on blue-ruled homemade cover carried by eastbound Trans-Mississippi Express to Fayetteville N.C., sender's directive "Via Alexandria", red "Alexandria La. Jan. 31" (1864) circular datestamp applied in transit, cover is an adversity use constructed from part of an 1862 letter

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FEW COVERS IN EXISTENCE WITH THE 40-CENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS RATE PAID BY A BLOCK OF STAMPS. AN OUTSTANDING SHOWPIECE AND ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COVERS EXTANT.

Illustrated in Krieger (p. 23, No. W5). Krieger also illustrates two other covers from this correspondence -- both adversity uses (wallpaper). Illustrated in Confederate Philatelist (Vol. 64, no. 4, p. 43). Ex Knapp, Clippert and Kilbourne. With 1989 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 7,500-10,000
Future Sale
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332
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 332, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12c), 10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12c)10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12c). Horizontal strip of four, large even margins, tied by "Jackson Miss. Jul. --" circular datestamp boldly struck three times on yellow 1864 westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to San Antonio Tex., right stamp with small hole and small surface scrape, part of side flap missing

EXTREMELY FINE. ONLY A FEW TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS COVERS ARE RECORDED WITH THE JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, POSTMARK. THIS IS ONE OF THE CHOICEST TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS COVERS EXTANT.

The Krieger census (and Confederate Philatelist Nov.-Dec. 1986 update) list only three covers postmarked at Jackson Miss. -- one West-to-East and two East-to-West. In the case of the West-to-East cover, it was carried across the river and deposited at the Jackson post office. The condition of this strip and cover is superior to the other two.

Ex Dr. Green. With 2000 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
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333
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 333, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Deep Blue, Die A, Keatinge & Ball (11 var), 10c Deep Blue, Die A, Keatinge & Ball (11 var)10c Deep Blue, Die A, Keatinge & Ball (11 var). Two vertical pairs, originally forming a block of four, huge margins all around, intense dark shade and proof-like impression, tied by "Newnan Ga. Dec. 27" (1864) circular datestamp on westbound Trans-Mississippi Express oatmeal cover to Noland's River Tex., soldier's endorsement "From J. H. Hart, Co. J, 18th Tex. Cav." and routed "Per Express Mail Via Meridian, Mississippi", pencil "2" at upper right, very slightly reduced at right

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS COVERS EXTANT. ONLY A FEW ARE KNOWN WITH THE DISTINCTIVE 10-CENT KEATINGE & BALL PRINTING.

The majority of 40c Trans-Mississippi Express covers have stamps with faults or margins cutting into part of the design, and the covers are usually stained and faulty. The condition of the stamps and overall quality of this cover are extraordinary.

Ex Simon and Walske. With 1997 P.F. certificate.

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
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334
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 334, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12c), 10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12c)10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12c). Horizontal strip of four, ample margins, carefully cut to shape at corners, tied by "Camden S.C. Mar. 7" (1864) circular datestamp on turned westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to Dr. James S. Milling at Collinsburgh La., from his wife with directive "Per express mail via Brandon Miss.", inside used first to Camden, "Collinsburgh La. Sep. 9" circular datestamp and manuscript "Paid 10", blue "Columbia S.C. Sep. 22" circular datestamp and matching "Missent" straightline, one side flap removed, small opening nick at right

VERY FINE. AN EXTREMELY UNUSUAL TURNED USE COMBINING THE REGULAR 10-CENT RATE, A MISSENT AUXILLIARY HANDSTAMP AND THE 40-CENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS RATE.

James S. Milling was a physician and planter in Fairfield District S.C. In 1859, Milling moved his slaves to a plantation in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, where he spent the Civil War years while his wife (also his cousin), Mary W. Milling, and their children remained with her family near Camden S.C. The Milling letters are available at the Library of the University of North Carolina, and some can be found on the internet at www.docsouth.unc.edu .

Four Trans-Mississippi Express covers from the Milling correspondence are listed in the Krieger census -- Nos. E18, E19 (the cover offered here), E36 and E60 (offered in lot 335).

Ex Birkinbine and Walske. With 1975 C.S.A. certificate.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
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335
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 335, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail20c Green (13), 20c Green (13)20c Green (13). Horizontal pair, large margins all around, tied by "Jackson Creek Feby 1" (South Carolina) pencil manuscript postmark on buff westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to Dr. James S. Milling in Collinsburgh La., from his wife Mary near Camden, peculiar notations at left appear to be in the same hand as address, some minor cleaning and skillful cosmetic edge improvements along bottom edge and top right corner of cover (not affecting stamps)

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. A REMARKABLY CHOICE PAIR OF THE 20-CENT GENERAL ISSUE PAYING THE 40-CENT GOVERNMENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS RATE ON A WESTBOUND COVER FROM THE MILLING CORRESPONDENCE.

James S. Milling was a physician and planter in Fairfield District S.C. In 1859, Milling moved his slaves to a plantation in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, where he spent the Civil War years while his wife (also his cousin), Mary W. Milling, and their children remained with her family near Camden S.C. The Milling letters are available at the Library of the University of North Carolina, and some can be found on the internet at www.docsouth.unc.edu .

Other Trans-Mississippi Express covers from the Milling correspondence are listed in the Krieger census as Nos. E18, E19 (offered in lot 334) and E36. This is illustrated as No. E60, and the Krieger entry mentioned an 8-page letter enclosure that is no longer with this cover.

Ex Birkinbine and Walske. With 1982 P.F. certificate (showing cover before it was cleaned and treated)

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
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336
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 336, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Milky Blue, Die A (11a), 10c Milky Blue, Die A (11a)10c Milky Blue, Die A (11a). Vertical strip of three and single, large margins to ample at right center of strip, each with neat manuscript "X" cancel, manuscript "Clinton La. Jany 25/84" postmark and "Express Mail" endorsement in the same hand on oatmeal westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to Shreveport La.

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED INTRA-STATE COVER CARRIED BY TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS.

Clinton, Louisiana, is located east of the Mississippi River, and Shreveport lies west of the Mississippi. The Krieger census and our own records of Trans-Mississippi Express covers do not contain any other example of mail carried entirely within the boundaries of one state.

Signed MacBride. With 2002 C.S.A. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
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337
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 337, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail10c Blue, Die A (11), 10c Blue, Die A (11)10c Blue, Die A (11). Horizontal strip of four, mostly large margins except at bottom left where touching, tied by four clear strikes of Army of Northern Virginia 10-Bar unframed grid cancel on westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to Miss Eliza Davis in Sumpter Tex., minor edgewear and light soiling

VERY FINE. ONE OF FIVE RECORDED TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS COVERS WITH ARMY FIELD OFFICE MARKINGS AND THE ONLY ONE OF THESE ORIGINATING WITH THE ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

Four of the five covers recorded by Krieger with army field cancellations come from the Army of the Tennessee. Only this cover has the grids used by the Army of Northern Virginia in the field. Three other covers have targets or grids of uncertain origin.

Listed in Krieger as No. E53. Ex Haas, Murphy and Walske. With 1983 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
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338
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 338, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail20c Green (13), 20c Green (13)20c Green (13). Horizontal pair, rich color, large margins almost all around, just barely touched at lower left, neatly tied by "Charleston S.C. Nov. 22" double-circle datestamp (ca. 1864) on small westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to Kingston La. in De Soto Parish, sender's routing "via Shreveport"

EXTREMELY FINE. AMONG THE TWO OR THREE FINEST COVERS WITH THE 20-CENT ENGRAVED STAMP USED TO PAY THE 40-CENT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS RATE. PHENOMENAL QUALITY FOR THIS TYPE OF USE.

No more than 20 covers with a pair of the 20c Green paying the 40c Trans-Mississippi Express rate are known (see The Trans-Mississippi Mails After the Fall of Vicksburg, Richard Krieger). Of these, only five or six are in reasonably clean and sound condition, and most are heavily stained and damaged. This cover is indisputedly one of the two or three finest of its kind.

Listed in Krieger as E59 (page 56). Ex Dr. Green and Kramer. With 2015 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 4,000-5,000
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339
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 339, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail20c Green (13), 20c Green (13)20c Green (13). Horizontal pair, slightly irregular but mostly large margins except just touching at right, right stamp with pre-use vertical crease ending in a tear, tied by small "Shreveport La. Jul. 6, 1864" double-circle datestamp on westbound Trans-Mississippi Express buff cover to Sumpter, Tex., manuscript docketing at top "J.B. Sexton MC" and "politeness of Col Sexton" below, cover with trivial edge tears including one sealed at top

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. AN EXTREMELY RARE EAST-TO-WEST TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS COVER, BEARING A PAIR OF THE 20-CENT GENERAL ISSUE.

No more than 20 covers with a pair of the 20c Green paying the 40c Trans-Mississippi Express rate are known. A majority of the known covers are heavily stained and damaged. It is believed that this particular cover was hand-carried from Richmond to Shreveport where it was placed in the mails, possibly by Franklin Sexton. Sexton was a wealthy Texas planter and lawyer who represented Texas 4th District in the Confederate Congress.

Illustrated in Krieger book (No. E27). With 1982 C.S.A. certificate.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
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340
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 340, Trans-Mississippi Express Mail20c Green (13), 20c Green (13)20c Green (13). Horizontal pair, full to large margins except just touching at top of right stamp, tied by well-struck "Georgetown S.C. Nov. 3" circular datestamp on westbound Trans-Mississippi Express cover to "Col. Ben Austin, PA CS -- Genl. E.K. Smith, Shreveport La., via Meridian Miss.", stamps additionally tied by Meridian Miss. dateless circular handstamp, manuscript "ppd. 40 cents" at bottom left, cover skillfully restored to remove staining

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. AN EXTREMELY RARE EAST-TO-WEST TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPRESS COVER, BEARING A PAIR OF THE 20-CENT GENERAL ISSUE TIED BY THE MERIDIAN TERMINUS OFFICE DATESTAMP.

No more than 20 covers with a pair of the 20c Green paying the 40c Trans-Mississippi Express rate are known.

Illustrated in Krieger book (No. E35). Ex Shenfield, Corwin and Felton. Accompanied by biographical information about Col. Ben Austin.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
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341
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 341, Trans-Mississippi Express MailAgency Post Office Dept., Trans-Miss., Official Business, Agency Post Office Dept., Trans-Miss., Official BusinessAgency Post Office Dept., Trans-Miss., Official Business. Signed J. H. Starr on 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) to "John Macdonald Esq. Postmaster, Opelousas St. Landry Par. Louisiana", "Marshall Tex ? 22" circular datestamp

VERY FINE. A CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE SCARCE TRANS-MISSISIPPI POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT IMPRINT.

After the loss of New Orleans, Confederate Postmaster General Reagan began worrying about the Trans-Mississippi mails. On May 24, 1862, he notified his special postal agents about the impending interruption of the Trans-Mississippi mail service and stated that "It is necessary, in anticipation of such a contingency, for this Department to adopt measures to secure the transmission of the mails by any available modes and routes." He then gave instructions in the letter on how to "secure the transmission of the mails." The Confederate Congress endorsed his approach on October 6, 1862, by authorizing the appointment of special Trans-Mississippi post office agents, in an effort "to superintend and secure the certain and speedy transportation of the mails across the Mississippi River." J. H. Starr was appointed the Agent for the Trans-Mississippi Department effective March 12, 1864.

Ex Dietz (illustrated on p. 294 of his book), Judd and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
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