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Sale 1242 — The Gordon Eubanks Collection: United States 1851 to 1856 Imperforate Issue

Sale Date — Tuesday-Wednesday, 12-13 October, 2021

Category — One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
73
og
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 73, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Position 97R2, original gum, ample margins and 17mm bottom sheet margin, rich color, small internal crease near top, also tiny thin spot at very bottom edge of sheet margin, which would most likely not be mentioned on a certificate, still Very Fine, ex Cipolla, with copy of 1984 P.F. certificate for a block

1,000
900
74
og
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 74, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Positions 81/91L2, vertical pair, original gum, small h.r., enormous margins all around including huge bottom left corner sheet margins, the sheet margins are so wide they actually capture the outline of the edge of the printing plate, also with part of adjoining stamp at top, deep rich color and proof-like impression, couple trivial natural wrinkles not mentioned on accompanying certificates and noted here only to satisfy the most nitpicking buyer

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. A MAGNIFICENT ORIGINAL-GUM PAIR OF THE 1851 ONE-CENT IMPERFORATE TYPE II WITH ENORMOUS BOTTOM AND LEFT SHEET MARGINS. A SPECTACULAR CLASSIC MULTIPLE.

There are several desirable positions of this type. Among these are: the one position on Plate 1 Late which is not recut; the top row positions on Plate 4, which show the design complete at top; the plate crack positions from the top left of Plate 2; and any stamp from the short-lived Plate 3. We would add corner sheet-margin positions to this list. This pair was cut from a block of eleven after it appeared in our 1988 Rarities sale.

Ex Chapin and Whitman. With 1989 and 2003 P.F. certificates. Scott value $2,300.00 as an ordinary pair

E. 5,000-7,500
6,000
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75
ogbl
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 75, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Positions 61-62/71-72R2, block of four, original gum, lightly hinged, mostly large margins including left sheet margin, clear at top, bright and fresh color, horizontal gum bend at bottom

VERY FINE SHEET-MARGIN ORIGINAL-GUM BLOCK OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 TYPE II.

From our 1990 Rarities sale. With 1980 P.F. certificate. Scott value $9,500.00

E. 3,000-4,000
3,250
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76
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 76, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Positions 40/50/60R2, vertical strip of three, ample to huge margins including "er, Casilear & Co. BANK NOTE ENGRAVERS. Phila. New York, Boston & Cincinnati" imprint and "No. 2." plate number, manuscript cancels and partly eradicated "Business Corner, Iowa" manuscript postmark in sheet margin (it can be seen in the Knapp sale catalogue), bottom stamp light diagonal crease and middle stamp short internal crease

FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL AND RARE ONE-CENT 1851 MULTIPLE SHOWING THE COMPLETE PLATE NUMBER FROM PLATE 2, ALONG WITH MOST OF THE IMPRINT.

Ex Knapp (who also owned the cover from which the strip was removed), Fleckenstein, Cowitt, Cipolla and Allan Fox

E. 2,000-3,000
3,500
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77
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 77, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Positions 31/41/51/61L2, reconstruction of the full left imprint and "No. 2” plate number, consisting of a vertical strip of three and single, Position 51L2 uncancelled, couple small flaws including small holes in margin on two stamps, scissors-cuts between stamps in strip (second and third stamps separated and reattached), Fine appearance, a rare complete imprint reconstruction from Plate 2, ex Cipolla, with 2010 P.F. certificate for the top three stamps

E. 1,000-1,500
1,700
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78
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 78, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Position 92L2, enormous margins all around including parts of adjoining stamps at top and left, rich color, light strike of circular datestamp and clear part strike of Milan, Italy transit datestamp at bottom, Extremely Fine Gem, a superb and unusual stamp, ex Newbury and Vogel, with 2011 P.F. certificate, Scott value $135.00 without premium for the cancel

E. 500-750
1,800
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79
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 79, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Position 41R2, double transfer, huge margins to full at upper right, showing parts of adjoining stamps at top and bottom, sheet margin at left, deep shade contrasted by vivid "paint red" "Mobile Ala. Aug." circular datestamp, Extremely Fine, with 1980 P.F. certificate

155
2,400
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80
ogbl
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 80, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var), 1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var). Positions 1-4/11-14/21-24L2, top left corner margin block of twelve, containing four of the Plate 2 crack positions (2, 12, 13 and 23), a late state of the crack showing widening thru Position 23, original gum, three large to immense margins including most of sheet margins, clear to just barely in on two stamps in bottom row, beautiful rich color and optimum state of freshness, small selvage tear barely into one stamp (Position 3), two faint creases not noticeable on face of block

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. THE LARGEST RECORDED BLOCK CONTAINING THE PLATE 2 CRACK AND, IN ASHBROOK'S OWN WORDS, "THIS MAGNIFICENT MINT PIECE IS ONE OF THE FINEST ONE-CENT IMPERFORATE ITEMS KNOWN."

Unlike plate cracks resulting from stress fractures during the course of printing, the Plate 2 crack is believed to have been caused by a integral flaw in the steel plate. As Plate 2 was used, the crack widened and extended downward into the fourth row. Due to the nature of this unusually large crack, Ashbrook preferred to call it the "Plate 2 Flaw." This block shows the crack at a later, more well-developed stage.

This phenomenal block is described and illustrated in the Neinken book (pp. 176-181, cropped to show the lefthand block of nine), Brookman Vol. I (p. 119-120) and Rose's Classic United States Imperforate Stamps (pp. 48-49).

Ex Joe T. Lozier, Edward H. R. Green, William L. Moody III, Benjamin D. Phillips, Rudolf Wunderlich, Ryohei Ishikawa and Robert Zoellner, and from our 1969 Rarities sale.

With 1993 P.F. certificate

E. 30,000-40,000
32,500
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81
og
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 81, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var), 1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var). Positions 1-3L2, strip of three with full top left corner sheet margins, clearly showing the outline of the plate, Position 2L2 with huge "Lightning Bolt" crack along right side of design, the early state of the crack, slightly toned original gum, middle stamp with light vertical crease, left stamp with light vertical crease in the margin clear of the ornaments

A SPECTACULAR ORIGINAL-GUM STRIP FROM THE TOP LEFT CORNER OF PLATE 2, SHOWING ONE OF THE "BIG FLAW" PLATE CRACK POSITONS.

Unlike plate cracks resulting from stress fractures during the course of printing, the Plate 2 crack is believed to have been caused by an integral flaw in the steel. As Plate 2 was used, the crack widened and extended downward into the fourth row. Due to the nature of this unusually large crack, Ashbrook preferred to call it the "Plate 2 Flaw." This strip shows the crack at an early stage.

With 2003 P.F. certificate

E. 3,000-4,000
2,700
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82
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 82, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var), 1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var). Three singles, Positions 2L2, 12L2 and 33L2, each showing a portion of the Plate 2 crack, Position 2L2 most prominent with the "Lightening Bolt" appearance down the length of the stamp (also a stitch watermark), Position 33L2 with the very bottom of the crack showing at top, first two with handstamp cancels, last with pen cancel, Very Fine trio, each with P.F. certificate

Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 82, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var), 1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var)
Image 2
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 82, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var), 1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var)
Image 3
E. 750-1,000
2,100
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83
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 83, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var), 1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var)1c Blue, Type II, Plate 2 Crack (7 var). Positions 23-25L2, three stamps from a horizontal strip, scissors-separated and seamlessly joined, left stamp (Position 23) showing bottom of crack in its early state, ample to large margins, tied by grid cancel and "Nantucket Mass. Jul. 24" circular datestamp on small cover to Boston

EXTREMELY FINE. A CHOICE ON-COVER EXAMPLE OF THE PLATE 2 FLAW.

Unlike plate cracks resulting from stress fractures during the course of printing, the Plate 2 crack is believed to have been caused by a integral flaw in the steel plate. As Plate 2 was used, the crack widened and extended downward into the fourth row. Due to the nature of this unusually large crack, Ashbrook preferred to call it the "Plate 2 Flaw."

Ex Neinken, Zoellner, Dr. Puliafito and Cipolla. With 1998 P.F. certificate

E. 1,500-2,000
1,500
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84
ogbl
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 84, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8), 1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8). Positions 79-80/89-90/99-100R2, block of six containing Position 99R2 at bottom left, other stamps Type II (Scott 7), Position 89R2 with pronounced double transfer, original gum, h.r. at top, bottom right corner sheet margins, large margin at left, slightly in at top, vertical crease affects right stamps, top left stamp small repair, middle left stamp small surface scrape, the most important stamp (Position 99R2) is completely sound and superb

VERY FINE-EXTREMELY FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE ORIGINAL-GUM BLOCK OF SIX FROM THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE 2. THIS PHENOMENAL MULTIPLE CONTAINS THE FINEST ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLE OF POSITION 99R2, A MAJOR CLASSIC RARITY.

Plate 2 was made in late 1855, and consists of 198 stamps that are Type II, one position that is Type III (99R2) and one that can be Type II or Type IIIa (100R2). To summarize the Ashbrook and Neinken books: Guide dots were used to correctly lay out the spacing for the plate. Positions 79 and 89 were transferred perfectly using their guide dots. However, the guide dot to the south-east of Position 88R2, which was used to align the single B Relief for Position 99R2, was placed far out of line. The misplaced dot was accidentally used and the bed of the press was moved too far, resulting in the bottom part of the A Relief being transferred into the bottom part of Position 89 (and in the margin below this position) by mistake. The original entry of Position 99R was out of place and so it was erased or burnished out, but seemingly no attempt was made to erase the parts of the A Relief transferred into the bottom of Position 89R. When the fresh entry was made in Position 99R a full transfer of the design was not possible without running into the error in Position 89R. The position was therefore short transferred at top, and apparently also at bottom, creating the finest example of Type III found on any plate (see pp. 183-184 of Neinken book). Position 100R2 can be Type IIIa (from plate wear) but it is an early state Type II in the block offered here. Position 100R2 can be Type IIIa (from plate wear), but it is an early state Type II in the block offered here.

From our 1981 Rarities sale--the collector who acquired it there resold it 31 years later in our Sale 1037. With 1981 and 2012 P.F. certificates.

E. 50,000-75,000
80,000
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85
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 85, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8), 1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8). Huge margins all around including an enormous bottom sheet margin, deep shade and sharp impression shows the wide breaks in outer lines at top and bottom--these are the defining characteristics of Type III, and no other position on any plate has wider breaks, making 99R2 the finest example of its kind--tied by red "Paid/U.S. Mail/City Delivery/1 Aug. 3” one-cent integral-rate New York City carrier datestamp on cover to East Broadway address, the stamp is a superb Gem and the cover is immaculate

EXTREMELY FINE GEM EXAMPLE OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 IMPERFORATE, SCOTT 8, FROM POSITION 99R2. THIS MAGNIFICENT COVER--RENOWNED IN CLASSIC UNITED STATES PHILATELY AS THE "NEWBURY 99R2” COVER--IS AN EXTRAORDINARY COMBINATION OF QUALITY AND RARITY. STANLEY B. ASHBROOK, THE EMINENT PHILATELIC SCHOLAR, LAUDED THIS COVER AS "HIGH IN THE LIST OF THE FINEST OF U.S. COVERS KNOWN.”

Plate 2 was made in late 1855, and consists of 198 stamps that are Type II, one position that is Type III (99R2) and one that can be Type II or Type IIIa (100R2). To summarize the Ashbrook and Neinken books: Guide dots were used to correctly lay out the spacing for the plate. Positions 79 and 89 were transferred perfectly using their guide dots. However, the guide dot to the south-east of Position 88R2, which was used to align the single B Relief for Position 99R2, was placed far out of line. The misplaced dot was accidentally used and the bed of the press was moved too far, resulting in the bottom part of the A Relief being transferred into the bottom part of Position 89 (and in the margin below this position) by mistake. The original entry of Position 99R was out of place and so it was erased or burnished out, but seemingly no attempt was made to erase the parts of the A Relief transferred into the bottom of Position 89R. When the fresh entry was made in Position 99R a full transfer of the design was not possible without running into the error in Position 89R. The position was therefore short transferred at top, and apparently also at bottom, creating the finest example of Type III found on any plate (see pp. 183-184 of Neinken book).

Stanley B. Ashbrook referred to this cover in his 1938 book as the "Superb 99R2 Newbury Cover” and described it in glowing terms: "This is the finest cover I have ever seen showing use of this rare stamp. This copy of the 99R2 is an early printing, a marvelous engraving, a beautiful deep blue color. In addition the stamp has the full sheet margin at bottom with a boardwalk around the other three sides. And to top all, it is neatly tied by a brilliant red ‘New York Carrier’ marking. It certainly is a cover that leaves nothing to be desired. It ranks high in the list of the finest U.S. covers known.”

The only earlier mention of this cover we have located is in the catalogue entry for Saul Newbury’s exhibit in the 1934 national philatelic exhibition in New York City. We have been unable to find Newbury’s source for the cover or any sale record before his ownership.

Newbury exhibited his namesake 99R2 cover again at the May 1940 Centenary Exhibition held at the Collectors Club of New York to commemorate Great Britain’s first issue. The cover was also one of the cornerstones of Newbury’s exhibit which captured the Grand Award at the 1947 CIPEX show. Newbury died three years later, in 1950. His collections were kept by his son, Michael, until 1961, when the Siegel firm held the first of a series of auctions. In the Newbury sale held on October 23-24, 1963, the Weills acquired the cover for their secret client, Benjamin D. Phillips, for $5,750. At that point Phillips became the new owner of the Newbury 7R1E and 99R2 covers.

The Weills bought the entire Phillips collection in 1968 for $4.07 million. The cover appeared in Siegel Rarities sales in 1969 and 1972, and then sold to Ryohei Ishikawa, who formed several important collections, including the 1c 1851-57s. Ishikawa included the Newbury 99R2 cover in his triple Grand Prix 1847-1869 exhibit. At the October 1993 Christie’s Robson Lowe auction of the Ishikawa collection, the cover sold to Andrew Levitt as agent for John R. Boker, Jr., who assembled a select group of classic imperforate U.S. items. Boker later traded this group for Mr. Eubanks’s Waterbury fancy cancellations.

Illustrated in Stanley B. Ashbrook, The United States One Cent Stamp of 1851-1857, Vol. I (p. 204) and Neinken revision (p.185).

Ex Saul Newbury, Benjamin D. Phillips, Ryohei Ishikawa and John R. Boker, Jr., and from our 1969 and 1972 Rarities sales. Backstamped "R.H.W. Co.” (Weill).

With 2021 P.F. certificate.

Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 85, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8), 1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8)
Image 2
E. 30,000-40,000
47,500
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86
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 86, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8), 1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8)1c Blue, Type III, Position 99R2 (8). Positions 97-99R2, horizontal strip of three, right stamp the famous Type III, Position 99R2, left pair Type II (7), large margins to just touched at top, rich color, light strikes of grid cancels, left stamp small flaw at bottom left, right stamp (99R2) insignificant and barely detectable corner crease at top right not mentioned on certificate

A MAGNIFICENT STRIP OF THREE CONTAINING AN EXTREMELY FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE RARE AND DESIRABLE POSITION 99R2--THE MOST PROMINENT EXAMPLE OF TYPE III--SHOWING WIDE BREAKS AT TOP AND BOTTOM.

Type III is defined by breaks in the outer lines at both top and bottom. Many Type III stamps have breaks that were created or enlarged by plate wear. Since the wear occurred over a period of time, a majority of stamps of this type (both unused and used) have small breaks in at least one line. The most notable exception is Position 99R2. According to the Neinken book, "The 99R2 stamp is a fresh entry, that was short transferred both at top and bottom, over an original entry that had been erased... The reason that 99R2 is the finest example of Type III is because of its very short transfer at top and at bottom, giving us the wide breaks in these lines." (p. 184).

Ex West, Consul Klep and Ishikawa. With 1980 P.F. certificate. Scott value $10,635.00 as combination pair and single

E. 5,000-7,500
3,750
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87
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 87, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Position 89R2 with the most pronounced double transfer on any United States stamp, full margins to touched at bottom left, clearly showing the design characteristics and double transfer, tied by "New-York Dec. 18" circular datestamp on blue folded cover to Philadelphia, fresh and Very Fine example of the "Big Shift" Position 89R2 double transfer, for a complete explanation of how this double transfer and the 99R2 short transfer occurred, see lot 84 or 85, or Neinken book (pages 181-187)

E. 500-750
850
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88
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 88, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Position 100R2, huge margins including portions of adjoining stamps at top and left, deep rich color and proof-like early impression, "New-York Dec. 5" circular datestamp, Extremely Fine Gem, a superb example of this better position, this is the only position on Plate 2 that yields a Type IIIa stamp (in its late state after plate wear), in this early state of the plate the position is Type II, given the richness of the color and the impression this is likely an 1855 use, if so this would be an earliest documented use, ex Cowitt and Allan Fox

E. 750-1,000
2,600
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89
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 89, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type IIIa (8A), 1c Blue, Type IIIa (8A)1c Blue, Type IIIa (8A). Position 100R2, clear broken line at bottom, full to large margins all around with portion of adjoining stamp at top, lightly struck circular datestamp cancel, tiny and trivial corner crease, still Extremely Fine, this is the only position on Plate 2 that yields a Type IIIa stamp, in the early state of the plate the position was Type II but became Type IIIa as the plate wore through use, ex Cowitt and Fox, French dealer backstamp, listed but unpriced in Scott, Scott value as normal 8A from Plate 1E is $750.00

E. 500-750
2,300
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90
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 90, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Positions 1-3R2, horizontal strip of three, large margins to just touched, tied by well-struck "Winona M.T. Jul. 11" Minnesota Territory circular datestamp on cover to Honesdale Pa., with original 1857-dated contents, minor edgewear, right pair in strip is Extremely Fine, ex Risvold and Vogel, with 2015 P.F. certificate

E. 400-500
650
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91
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 91, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Used with 10c Green, Type III (33) with selvage at left and pair and single of 3c Dull Red, Type III (26), all tied by rimless "Buffalo N.Y. Feb. 1" (1858) circular datestamps, 1c also tied by red grid cancel on cover to "Edward D. Robie U.S.N., U.S. Steam Frigate Susquehanna, Aspinwall, New Granada", thick original letter enclosure (which no longer accompanies) and placement near edge cause some minor stamp faults, 1c with small nick and tiny edge tear, Fine appearance, a colorful mixed Imperforate and Perforated issue franking for double rate to Aspinwall

E. 500-750
475
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92
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 92, One-Cent: Plate Two (Scott 7, 8)1c Blue, Type II (7), 1c Blue, Type II (7)1c Blue, Type II (7). Block of six from Plate 2, dark color, margins to cut in at top and right, cancelled by blurry strikes of "Crescent City Cal. Feb. 18" large double-circle datestamp, left strike possibly ties to cover, clearer strike of same datestamp over indicia of 10c Green Nesbitt entire (U17) to Livorno, Italy, red "New-York Am. Pkt. Apr. 19" transit datestamp, French entry datestamp and manuscript "17" crazie due for a cover sent by American Packet to England and then via France to Tuscany, receiving backstamp, bottom left stamp small crease, some mended backflap faults, Fine appearing and extremely rare cover with a block of six of the 1c 1851 Issue, the franking of only 16c is difficult to explain as it underpaid the 26c rate from California to Europe via American Packet, however no stamps appear to be missing so perhaps either the shortage was paid in cash or ignored by the postal clerks

E. 1,500-2,000
1,400
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