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Sale 1242 — The Gordon Eubanks Collection: United States 1851 to 1856 Imperforate Issue

Sale Date — Tuesday-Wednesday, 12-13 October, 2021

Category — One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
6
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 6, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Types I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A), 1c Blue, Types I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A)1c Blue, Types I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A). Positions 7-8-9R1E, horizontal strip of three, Type I at left and two Type Ib stamps at right, large margins all around showing traces of surrounding positions at left and bottom, brilliant Plate 1 Early shade and finely detailed impression, complemented by clear strikes of vivid red grid cancel, equally sharp strike of matching "Richmond Va. Jul. 5" (1851) circular datestamp on blue folded letter datelined "Richmond July 5th 1851" from Womble & Company to Blow & March in New York City, letter reports the availability of apple brandy, the strip and folded letter are pristine and flawless

EXTREMELY FINE GEM STRIP CONTAINING THE FINEST EXAMPLE OF SCOTT 5, THE 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE I IMPERFORATE, USED ON THE FIFTH DAY OF ISSUE. STANLEY B. ASHBROOK, THE EMINENT PHILATELIC SCHOLAR, HAILED THIS AS "NUMBER ONE" OF ALL RARE UNITED STATES COVERS.

The 1c 1851 Franklin, a workhorse postage stamp from 1851 through 1861, was printed from 200-subject steel plates numbered 1 through 12 (Plate 6 was never used, and Plate 1 exists in Early and Late states). Only Plates 1 through 4 were used to print stamps that were issued imperforate. The original 1c 1851 die design has an elaborate ornamental border on all four sides. Several factors affected the designs entered on the plates, which in turn produced variations in the printed stamps. Stanley B. Ashbrook developed the system used to classify design types, based on the premise that Type I should be a printed version that comes closest to the original die design. The completeness of the ornamentation at top and bottom is a requirement for Type I. For imperforate stamps, Ashbrook found only one position among the 1,000 subjects that met this requirement--Position 7R1E--which is why Scott 5, a Type I imperforate stamp, is so rare. Type Ib, Scott 5A, has slightly less ornamentation and was also printed from Plate 1 Early (imperforate only).

Most of the approximately 100 known examples of Scott 5 do not have full margins, so parts of the ornamentation are cut off. The strip offered here has large margins, providing an unimpeded view of the Type I and Type Ib designs. The strip's margins, brilliant color, sharp impression, neat red cancels and sound condition, and the cover's overall appearance, led Ashbrook to declare it to be "number one" among covers with U.S. general issues, possessing "everything that could possibly be desired in a rare cover." He added, "I have no apologies to offer for my enthusiasm over this gem."

Although known as the "Newbury" cover, in tribute to one of its owners, Saul Newbury, the cover has in fact been owned by at least four other prominent collectors. It made its first auction appearance in 1911 at a sale held by George R. Tuttle, where it was described as "a most beautiful and perfect strip... mailed from Richmond, July 5, 1851, a most desirable and unique cover..." It realized $136. We have no record of the buyer in this 1911 sale. The cover was acquired 25 years later by Robert S. Emerson in a private transaction shortly before he died in 1937. The new acquisition was reported in a September 9, 1936, letter to Ashbrook, in which Emerson referred to it as the "finest 7R1E cover in existence." The cover was offered by Kelleher in an October 1937 sale of part of Emerson’s collection sold after his death, where it was described as "one of the gems of the sale.” In Warren H. Colson's personal copy of the catalogue, he wrote "tres beau." The cover was bought for $2,800 by Ernest R. Jacobs as agent for Newbury, who exhibited his namesake cover at the May 1940 Centenary Exhibition held at the Collectors Club of New York to commemorate Great Britain's first issue. It was also one of the cornerstones of his exhibit which captured the Grand Award at the 1947 CIPEX show. Newbury died three years later, in 1950. His collections were kept by his son, Michael, until 1961, when the Siegel firm held the first of a series of auctions. In the Newbury sale held on October 23-24, 1963, the 7R1E cover went up for bidding for the first time in a quarter century. The Weills acquired the cover for their secret client, Benjamin D. Phillips, for $12,000, a record price which made headlines.

The Weills bought the entire Phillips collection in 1968 for $4.07 million and sold the cover to Ryohei Ishikawa, who formed several important collections, including the 1c 1851-57s. Ishikawa included the Newbury cover in his triple Grand Prix 1847-1869 exhibit. At the October 1993 Christie’s Robson Lowe auction of the Ishikawa collection, the cover sold to Andrew Levitt as agent for John R. Boker, Jr., who assembled a select group of classic imperforate U.S. items. Boker later traded this group for Mr. Eubanks’s Waterbury fancy cancellations.

Wagshal census no. 5-COV-085. Illustrated in Stanley B. Ashbrook, The United States One Cent Stamp of 1851-1857, Vol. I (p. 124) and Neinken revision (p. 76); Lester G. Brookman, The United States Postage Stamps of the 19th Century, Vol. I (p. 112); and in numerous other philatelic publications.

From the George R. Tuttle Sale 172, Apr. 22, 1911, lot 11; ex Robert S. Emerson, Saul Newbury, Benjamin D. Phillips, Ryohei Ishikawa and John R. Boker, Jr.

Backstamped "R.H.W. Co.” (Weill). With 2021 P.F. certificate.

Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 6, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Types I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A), 1c Blue, Types I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A)
Image 2
E. 200,000-300,000
310,000
7
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 7, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Type I (5), 1c Blue, Type I (5)1c Blue, Type I (5). Positions 7R1E, with top sheet margin, other sides full to slightly in at lower right, just barely into bottom plumes, bright Plate 1 Early color, tied by light red grid cancel on July 12, 1851 printed circular from Great Falls to Portsmouth N.H., a notice of the annual stockholders’ meeting of the Great Falls Manufacturing Co., docketed on back, pristine condition

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. A BEAUTIFUL SOLO USE AND SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE ONE-CENT TYPE I IMPERFORATE ON COVER. POSITION 7R1E IS THE ONLY ONE WITH THE COMPLETE DIE DESIGN ON ANY OF THE PLATES USED TO PRINT THE STAMPS ISSUED IMPERFORATE.

The published census compiled by Jerome S. Wagshal (available at our website at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5 ), contains at least 98 unduplicated records of Scott 5. There are probably no more than ten examples existing outside of the Wagshal census population. Therefore, the 1c 1851 Type I is the rarest of all United States stamps issued regularly prior to the 1868 Grills. The census lists a total of 23 examples of Position 7R1E on cover, of which eleven are used to pay a circular rate or drop-letter rate, the purpose for which this denomination was created. This is the second earliest use recorded in the Wagshal census.

Wagshal census no. 5-COV-072. Submitted to Stanley B. Ashbrook by Spencer Anderson on June 13, 1940. Ex Benjamin D. Phillips (purchased October 1950), Isabelle Lessmann (Sale 638, lot 21) and William Kelley (Ivy sale, Mar. 16, 1989, lot 47), and from our 1969 Rarities sale.

With 1984 and 2004 P.F. certificates.

E. 30,000-40,000
35,000
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8
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 8, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A), 1c Blue, Type Ib (5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A). Position 5R1E--the fifth stamp in the top row of the right pane of Plate 1 Early, showing nearly full design elements at top and bottom--large top sheet margin and full margins on other three sides, showing all of the ornamentation that distinguishes this type from all others, beautiful bright early printing shade--known to collectors as Robin's Egg Blue--tied by single clear strike of grid cancel in dark red with matching "PAID" handstamp, "Boston Mas. Jul. 1" 1851 First Day of Issue circular datestamp struck in a much brighter and more vivid shade of red on blue folded circular with printed dateline "OFFICE OF PATHFINDER RAILWAY GUIDE, BOSTON, JUNE 30, 1851" from Snow & Wilder, publishers of the Pathfinder Railway Guide, a routine request for changes to advertisements for the recipient's railroad line, addressed to Silvanus Bourne, Superintendent of the Cape Cod Branch Railroad in Sandwich, Massachusetts, receipt docketing "June 30, 1851, Snow & Wilder"

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE FINER OF TWO ONE-CENT 1851 ISSUE FIRST DAY COVERS WITH A JULY 1 DATESTAMP. ADDING TO THE HISTORIC IMPORTANCE OF THIS FIRST DAY COVER IS THE USE OF A TYPE Ib, SCOTT 5A, A RARITY IN ITS OWN RIGHT.

Three new stamps--1c, 3c and 12c denominations-- were necessary after postage rates were revised by Congress during the Fillmore administration. Effective July 1, 1851, the basic rates became 1c for newspapers and circulars (with a distance escalation until 1852), 1c for drop letters and carrier fees, 3c for domestic letters sent up to 3,000 miles, and 6c for letters sent over 3,000 miles. Prepayment by stamps or stamped envelopes was not made compulsory until 1855, but for the first time there were higher rates for letters sent unpaid--5c instead of 3c, and 10c instead of 6c. The combination of convenience and the financial incentive to prepay postage led to a rapid increase in stamp use and popularity.

Under Postmaster General Nathan K. Hall, the contract to print the 1851 Issue was awarded to the Philadelphia firm of Toppan, Carpenter, Casilear & Co. (Casilear retired in October 1854, but his name was included in plate imprints as late as 1857). To start, only the 1c, 3c and 12c (and the General Issue Carrier stamps) were produced. A 10c stamp was added in 1855 to meet the new transcontinental rate, and a 5c stamp was added in 1856 for use on transatlantic mail. The firm’s original six-year contract was extended to 1861, during which time stamps were perforated and three new denominations were issued (24c, 30c and 90c), for a total of eight different stamps under Toppan Carpenter’s contract.

All three 1851 Issue stamps were supplied to certain post offices on or before July 1, 1851, the first day of the new rates. The census of 1851 First Day Covers published by Wilson Hulme in 2001 (The 1851 Issue of United States Stamps: A Sesquicentennial Retrospective, USPCS) tallied 45 covers from 23 cities in 11 states (one in the count was postmarked by the Louisville & Cincinnati Mail Line route agent). Only two of the 45 covers have 1c stamps--the Scott 5A cover from Boston offered here, and a cover with a strip of Scott 7 from New York City (ex Jefferys and Grunin). The other 43 have 3c stamps, and currently there are no 12c July 1 covers known.

This gem of United States classic philately was featured in the 1937 Kelleher sale of the Judge Robert S. Emerson collection. A note in Ashbrook’s personal copy of his book on the 1c 1851-57 Issue states that the cover later sold to Clara DeWindt, the wife of Heyliger DeWindt, a well-known collector and author. As far as we can determine, the cover was not offered publicly for the next 59 years, until Shreves Philatelic Galleries offered the Laurence S. Fisher collection of U.S. First Day Covers. William H. Gross made a rare personal appearance at the Shreves auction and purchased the cover.

Illustrated in Stanley B. Ashbrook, The United States One Cent Stamp of 1851-1857, Vol. I (p. 120) and Neinken revision (p. 78); Lester G. Brookman, United States Postage Stamps of the 19th Century, Vol. I (p. 116); W. Wilson Hulme II, "July lst 1851 Usages of the U.S. 1851 Issue,” The 1851 Issue of United States Stamps: A Sesquicentennial Retrospective (p. 119); and exhibited at World Stamp Show 2016 Court of Honor (Gross). Pencil note on back by Morris Fortgang, describing this as the only "recognized first day 1c 1851 in circulation," at a time when the one other recorded cover (New York July 1, 1851, with 1c Type II strip) was in the Jefferys collection at the Franklin Institute.

Ex Robert S. Emerson (with Emerson's pencil note "DFK Type I-B 5R1E" on back, which points to Daniel F. Kelleher as the source of the cover), Clara DeWindt (according to Ashbrook and Hulme), Lester Downing (according to Hulme), Morris Fortgang (his pencil note on back), additional pencil note on back "Sam Paige” possibly as a dealer source, Laurence S. Fisher and William H. Gross.

With 2021 P.F. certificate.

E. 100,000-150,000
125,000
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9
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 9, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Types Ib-II (5A-7), 1c Blue, Types Ib-II (5A-7)1c Blue, Types Ib-II (5A-7). Positions 9-10R1E, horizontal pair from the top right corner of Plate 1 Early, comprising Type Ib at left and the desirable Type II Position 10R1E at right, large margins including part of top sheet margin and traces of adjoining stamps at bottom, bright Plate 1 Early shade and proof-like impression, used with 3c Dull Red, Type II (11A), margins to cut in, tied by multiple strikes of red grid cancels and matching "New-York Feb. 11" circular datestamp on greenish blue folded cotton market report datelined Charleston S.C., Feb. 6, 1852, addressed to Basel, Switzerland, sender's directive "Pr Steamer Niagara, New York 11 Febr.", red British Feb. 24 transit datestamp on back, red Paris Feb. 25 transit datestamp ties 1c pair, "13" decimes due handstamp ties 3c stamp, red crayon "20” Swiss due marking, red Basel Feb. 27 receiving datestamp on back, transit markings with 1852 yeardate

EXTREMELY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT TRANSATLANTIC COVER TO SWITZERLAND, CARRIED OUTSIDE THE MAILS FROM CHARLESTON TO NEW YORK, THEN BY BRITISH PACKET. THE 1851 ONE-CENT PAIR COMES FROM THE TOP ROW OF PLATE ONE EARLY, COMPRISING TYPE Ib, POSITION 9R1E, AND THE ONLY TYPE II POSITION ON PLATE ONE EARLY WITH THE COMPLETE DESIGN AT TOP, POSITION 10R1E.

Type Ib was produced only as an imperforate stamp. Six positions on Plate 1 Early furnished stamps qualifying as Type Ib--Positions 3-6R and 8-9R--distinguished by the complete design at top and nearly complete design at bottom. When first entered on the plate, these six positions (as well as 7R1E) had the complete design at top and bottom. However, unlike 7R, small portions of the bottoms were ironed out when the entries were made below them. Position 10R was more extensively ironed out at the bottom, but the entry still retained its characteristic Type I T Relief complete design at top.

In the typed inventory of the Emmerson C. Krug collection made by Stanley B. Ashbrook in 1949, Ashbrook notes, "This is a very gorgeous cover and originally came from an original find in Switzerland."

Ex Robert S. Emerson, Emmerson C. Krug and Raymond Vogel. Ashbrook notes on back with his comment "A Superb Cover." With 2021 P.F. certificate.

E. 40,000-50,000
32,500
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10
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 10, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Types Ib-Ib/IIIA (5A-5A/8A), 1c Blue, Types Ib-Ib/IIIA (5A-5A/8A)1c Blue, Types Ib-Ib/IIIA (5A-5A/8A). Positions 3-4/13R1E, top stamps Type Ib with design complete at top and almost complete at bottom, large margins to barely in on Type IIIa stamp, small scissors-cut between top stamps at bottom, tied by clear single strike of blue "Eugene City O.T. Jun. 23" Oregon Territory circular datestamp on blue 1855 folded letter to Steilacoom, Washington Territory, addressed to Mrs. J. B. Devore

EXTREMELY FINE. AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE PLATE ONE EARLY MULTIPLE, COMPRISING TWO TYPE Ib STAMPS AND A TYPE IIIa STAMP, TIED BY A BLUE DATESTAMP FROM OREGON TERRITORY ON A LETTER TO WASHINGTON TERRITORY.

Eugene City lies on the Willamette River in Oregon. Steilacoom is in the Puget Sound area of Washington, and the first post office in Washington Territory was established there in 1852. It was also the first town incorporated in Washington Territory by the Territorial Legislature. In 1855, when this was sent, Steilacoom was experiencing disruptions due to Indian attacks.

Prior to the discovery of this cover in recent years, there was no example of a rare 1c 1851 type paying the 3c rate in the territories of the Pacific Northwest.

E. 15,000-20,000
16,500
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11
c
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 11, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Types II-II-Ib (7-7-5A), 1c Blue, Types II-II-Ib (7-7-5A)1c Blue, Types II-II-Ib (7-7-5A). Positions 1-3R1E, horizontal strip of three, left two stamps Type II, right stamp Type Ib, large to enormous margins including top left corner interpane sheet margins, brilliant Plate 1 Early shade and impression, each stamp cancelled by bright red grid, the left strike tying the strip, matching "Newburgh N. Y. Aug. 4" (1851) circular datestamp on buff cover to Detroit Mich., three faint gum stain spots in sheet margin at top which are insignificant and not noted on certificate

EXTREMELY FINE. AN EXCEPTIONALLY CHOICE CORNER-MARGIN STRIP OF THREE OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 ISSUE FROM THE TOP ROW OF THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE ONE EARLY, WITH THE RARE TYPE Ib AT THE RIGHT. THE STRIP IS OF BEAUTIFUL BRIGHT BLUE COLOR AND CANCELLED BY VIVID RED GRIDS.

Type Ib was produced only as an imperforate stamp. Six positions on Plate 1 Early furnished stamps qualifying as Type Ib--Positions 3-6R and 8-9R--distinguished by the complete design at top and nearly complete design at bottom. When first entered on the plate, these six positions (as well as 7R1E) had the complete design at top and bottom. However, unlike 7R, small portions of the bottoms of 3-6R and 8-9R were ironed out when the entries were made below them. Positions 1R and 2R (the two left stamps in this strip) were entered from the T Relief on the trimmed-relief transfer roll and have shortened ornaments at top.

By a remarkable coincidence, another cover is known from Newburgh, N.Y., from a different correspondence and dated exactly one month earlier, which bears an identical strip of three from the same positions with similar sheet margins (ex Mason, Newbury, Ishikawa, Grunin, Hackmey and Gross, see Sale 1211, lot 170). The datestamp on this cover is struck more clearly.

Ex Emerson, Knapp, Rust (sold in our 1981 Rarities sale on his behalf) and Dr. Kapiloff. With 1992 P.F. certificate

E. 10,000-15,000
30,000
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12
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 12, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A), 1c Blue, Type Ib (5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A). Position 6R1E, large margins including portion of Position 16 below, "New-York Nov. 11" circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL STMAP FROM POSITION 6R1E, ONE OF THE TWO POSITIONS THAT FURNISHED THE BEST TYPE Ib EXAMPLES, SHOWING THE COMPLETE DESIGN AT TOP AND NEARLY COMPLETE DESIGN AT BOTTOM.

Type Ib was produced only as an imperforate stamp from Plate 1 Early. Six positions on Plate 1E furnished stamps qualifying as Type Ib--Positions 3-6R and 8-9R--distinguished by the complete design at top and nearly complete design at bottom. When first entered on the plate, these six positions (as well as 7R1E) had the complete design at top and bottom. However, unlike 7R, small portions of the bottoms were ironed out when the entries were made below them. Positions 6R and 8R had less of the bottom erased than the other Type Ib positions, and for this reason they are more desirable examples of the type.

Ex Renne. With 1988 P.F. certificate. Signed Ashbrook with his note "a sound copy"

11,000
13,000
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13
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 13, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A), 1c Blue, Type Ib (5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A). Position 8R1E, full to large margins to full showing all design characteristics, rich color, bold large Boston "Paid" grid cancel

VERY FINE. POSITION 8R1E IS ONE OF TWO POSITIONS THAT FURNISHED THE BEST TYPE Ib EXAMPLES, SHOWING THE COMPLETE DESIGN AT TOP AND NEARLY COMPLETE DESIGN AT BOTTOM.

Type Ib was produced only as an imperforate stamp from Plate 1 Early. Six positions on Plate 1E furnished stamps qualifying as Type Ib--Positions 3-6R and 8-9R--distinguished by the complete design at top and nearly complete design at bottom. When first entered on the plate, these six positions (as well as 7R1E) had the complete design at top and bottom. However, unlike 7R, small portions of the bottoms were ironed out when the entries were made below them. Positions 6R and 8R had less of the bottom erased than the other Type Ib positions, and for this reason they are more desirable examples of the type.

With 1988 P.F. certificate.

11,000
5,500
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14
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 14, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A), 1c Blue, Type Ib (5A)1c Blue, Type Ib (5A). Positions 4-6R1E, horizontal strip of three contiguous Type Ib positions with large top sheet margin, other sides large to just touched at bottom left and slightly in at left, marvelous bright Robin's Egg Blue shade of Plate 1 Early, blue grid cancels which originate in Louisiana, very slight creasing at right and two tiny margin tears at right, these negligible flaws are barely detectable and do not affect the appearance, the left pair is sound

VERY FINE. AN IMPORTANT 1851 ONE-CENT ISSUE MULTIPLE FROM THE TOP ROW OF PLATE ONE EARLY, COMPRISING THREE RARE TYPE Ib POSITIONS, INCLUDING 6R1E, ONE OF THE TWO BEST EXAMPLES OF TYPE Ib.

Type Ib was produced only as an imperforate stamp. Six positions on Plate 1 Early furnished stamps qualifying as Type Ib--Positions 3-6R and 8-9R--distinguished by the complete design at top and nearly complete design at bottom. When first entered on the plate, these six positions (as well as 7R1E) had the complete design at top and bottom. However, unlike 7R, small portions of the bottoms were ironed out when the entries were made below them. Positions 6R and 8R had less of the bottom erased than the other Type Ib positions, and for this reason they are more desirable examples of the type. Only the original-gum block from Positions 4-9/14-15R1E (Wagshal census no. 5-UNC-002) and the strip of Positions 1-6R1E offered in the following lot contain a larger number of Type Ib stamps than are present in this strip.

Accompanied by cover front from which this strip originated. Ex Waterhouse, Neinken, Wagshal and Merlin. Scott value $27,000.00 as pair of Positions 4-5R1E and single Position 6R1E.

E. 10,000-15,000
14,000
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15
 
Sale Number 1242, Lot Number 15, One-Cent: Plate One Early (Scott 5-5A)1c Blue, Types II-II-Ib-Ib-Ib-Ib (7-7-5A-5A-5A-5A), 1c Blue, Types II-II-Ib-Ib-Ib-Ib (7-7-5A-5A-5A-5A)1c Blue, Types II-II-Ib-Ib-Ib-Ib (7-7-5A-5A-5A-5A). Positions 1-6R1E, horizontal strip of six, left two stamps Type II, right four stamps Type Ib, five stamps have huge margins, just in at right of right stamp, includes sheet margin at top and interpane margin at left, beautiful deep Plate 1 Early shade, each stamp remarkably cancelled by between 15 and 25 neat penstrokes which form a detailed grid, light diagonal crease affects Positions 1-2 (both Type II stamps), small sealed tear at bottom of Position 2 described on accompanying certificate as small repair, Position 4 with vertical crease

VERY FINE-EXTREMELY FINE. AN INCALCULABLY RARE STRIP OF SIX FROM THE TOP ROW OF THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE ONE EARLY. THIS STRIP CONTAINS THE LARGEST NUMBER OF TYPE Ib STAMPS IN A SINGLE USED MULTIPLE, INCLUDING 6R1E, ONE OF THE TWO BEST EXAMPLES OF TYPE Ib. A WONDERFUL ARTIFACT FROM THE MOST IMPORTANT ROW OF ANY ONE-CENT 1851-57 PLATE.

The top row of the right pane of Plate 1 Early has long been recognized by philatelists as a subject of special interest relating to the production of classic United States stamps. This extraordinary strip, including four of the six positions that produced Type Ib stamps, is a rarity of the highest order. It was probably removed from a transcontinental cover prepaid at the 6c rate. The mail clerk certainly took his time cancelling the stamps. Only the original-gum block from Positions 4-9/14-15R1E (Wagshal census no. 5-UNC-002) contains a larger number of Type Ib positions (five) than are present in this strip, but the largest possible number of contiguous Type Ib positions is four, in Positions 3-4-5-6R (Position 7R is Type I).

The earliest sale record of this strip is a Daniel F. Kelleher sale on Apr. 23, 1926. Ex Jefferys, Dinsmore Alter (Sale 374) and Wingate. Scott value $32,285.00 as two pairs of Scott 5A and a pair of Scott 7. With 2002 P.F. certificate

E. 7,500-10,000
15,000
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