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Sale 1238 — Civil War Special Mail Routes

Sale Date — Wednesday, 23 June, 2021

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Category — Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
268
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 268, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesWashington D.C. to Salem N.C. via Fortress Monroe and Norfolk Va, Washington D.C. to Salem N.C. via Fortress Monroe and Norfolk VaWashington D.C. to Salem N.C. via Fortress Monroe and Norfolk Va. Cover without contents but most likely originated in Washington D.C. (based on the similar cover offered in lot 269), from E. S. Zevely (brother of the Third Assistant Postmaster General) to his sister, Sophia J. Butner, in Salem N.C., 3c Rose (65), small toned spot at left, tied by blue "Norfolk Va. Nov. 18, 1861" Confederate circular datestamp, matching bold strike of "5" C.S.A. rate handstamp, large remnant of buff paper used to hold a United States Half-Dime coin (represented by a replacement coin) with sender's notation "Confed()" (likely indicating the coin was for C.S.A. postage), "Due 5" in circle handstamp for C.S.A. postage, choice condition for such an artifact

VERY FINE. AN OUTSTANDING FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER THROUGH FORTRESS MONROE AND NORFOLK, VIRGINIA, WITH CONFEDERATE AND UNITED STATES POSTAGE PREPAID AT THE POINT OF MAILING BY COIN AND A 3-CENT 1861 STAMP.

This southbound flag-of-truce letter was exchanged on the C.S.A. side at Norfolk, before U.S. forces captured the city on May 9, 1862. Flag-of-truce covers via Norfolk are very scarce, and only a few have evidence of Confederate postage paid by coins. This cover is from the same correspondence as the cover offered in lot 269. That cover, sent the following month, had two half-dimes attached and shows no C.S.A. postage due. We have speculated that the later cover was overpaid, but given the 5c due on this very similar cover, it is possible that Confederate postal authorities counted both as overweight (Norfolk is less than 500 miles from Salem N.C.).

Ex Knapp and Antrim

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
269
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 269, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesWashington D.C. to Salem N.C. via Fortress Monroe and Norfolk Va, Washington D.C. to Salem N.C. via Fortress Monroe and Norfolk VaWashington D.C. to Salem N.C. via Fortress Monroe and Norfolk Va. Folded letter datelined "Washington D.C. Dec'r 12, 1861" from E. S. Zevely (brother of the Third Assistant Postmaster General) to his sister, Sophia J. Butner, in Salem N.C., 3c Rose (65), straight edge at left and small piece of corner replaced at upper right, tied by blue "Norfolk Va. Dec. 7, 1861" Confederate circular datestamp, matching partly clear strike of "Paid 5c" in circle C.S.A. rate handstamp, large remnant of buff paper used to hold two United States Half-Dime coins (represented by replacement coins) with sender's notation "10 cts" (possibly overpaid 5c), small manuscript "Exd" censor mark at upper left, letter states "I send this via Fortress Monroe, hoping it will be allowed to pass, with others..." and a postscript "Attaching 3cts to pay Federal postage", waterstain around address

A FINE AND SPECTACULAR FLAG-OF-TRUCE LETTER THROUGH FORTRESS MONROE AND NORFOLK, VIRGINIA, WITH CONFEDERATE AND UNITED STATES POSTAGE PREPAID AT THE POINT OF MAILING BY COINS AND A 3-CENT 1861 STAMP.

This southbound flag-of-truce letter was exchanged on the C.S.A. side at Norfolk, before U.S. forces captured the city on May 9, 1862. Flag-of-truce covers via Norfolk are very scarce, and only a few have evidence of Confederate postage paid by coins. Based on the letter writer's statement and the appearance of the cover, this was apparently part of a group sent from Washington D.C. inside another envelope, and the U.S. 3c 1861 stamp escaped cancellation in the U.S. postal system. When the letter reached Norfolk, the datestamp was applied over the U.S. stamp.

Ex Dr. Brandon. With MacBride note on back.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
270
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 270, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFlag-of-Truce via Norfolk Va., Flag-of-Truce via Norfolk Va.Flag-of-Truce via Norfolk Va.. Blue "Norfolk Va. Jan. 10" (1862) Confederate double-circle datestamp and "Paid 5c" rate in circle handstamp on inner cover to Leesburg Va., manuscript examiner's initials, sender's notation "Postage within", outer cover containing U.S. postage from the point of origin would have been discarded at the exchange point, minor edgewear, Very Fine example of flag-of-truce mail exchanged via Fortress Monroe/Old Point Comfort and Norfolk Va. -- Norfolk was an early and short-lived exchange point for mail between the North and South, it ceased to serve as an exchange point with the Union occupation beginning May 9, 1862, this cover entered the Confederate mails on the same day as the cover offered in lot 271, in this case the coin was enclosed in the envelope rather than affixed to the back

Bid on this lot

E. 400-500
Future Sale
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271
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 271, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFlag-of-Truce via Norfolk Va, Flag-of-Truce via Norfolk VaFlag-of-Truce via Norfolk Va. Blue "Norfolk Va. Jan. 10" (1862) Confederate double-circle datestamp and "Paid 5c" rate in circle handstamp on inner cover to Charlotte C.H. Va., red manuscript "Exd S.C." examiner's marking at upper right, criss-crossed adhesive strips on back which held a coin that was removed to pay postage, outer cover containing U.S. postage from the point of origin would have been discarded at the exchange point, Very Fine example of flag-of-truce mail exchanged via Fortress Monroe/Old Point Comfort and Norfolk Va. -- Norfolk was an early and short-lived exchange point for mail between the North and South, it ceased to serve as an exchange point with the Union occupation beginning May 9, 1862, this cover entered the Confederate mails on the same day as the cover offered in lot 270, in this case the coin was affixed to the back rather than enclosed inside, ex "Summit"

Bid on this lot

E. 400-500
Future Sale
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272
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 272, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines, "Via Flag of Truce Norfolk". Manuscript endorsement at bottom of buff cover from Willington S.C. to New York City, civilian flag-of-truce use, entered C.S.A. mails with "Charleston S.C. Feb. 24, 186-" (1862) circular datestamp and "Paid 5" in circle handstamp, exchanged via Norfolk and Fortress Monroe, 3c Rose (65) affixed over the "Paid 5" circle and tied by "Old Point Comfort Va. Mar. 14" double-circle datestamp, manuscript docketing at top, accompanied by photocopy of original letter (which is in the South Carolina Historical Society archives) from James Petigru Carson to his mother with interesting content, stamp with small edge nick at right, cover missing bottom flap and slightly reduced at bottom, still Very Fine and scarce civilian flag-of-truce cover with postage of both sides, this was possible for only a short time (between November 1861 and April 1862)

Bid on this lot

E. 500-750
Future Sale
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273
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 273, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines5c Green, Stone 1-2 (1), 5c Green, Stone 1-2 (1)5c Green, Stone 1-2 (1). Tied by "Richmond Va. Jan. 27, 1862" circular datestamp, paying postage to Norfolk Va. on yellow civilian flag-of-truce cover from Richmond Va. to Stoughton Mass., endorsed "Via Norfolk & Flag of Truce", 3c Rose (65) affixed directly over C.S.A. stamp and tied by "Old Point Comfort Va. Feb. 10" double-circle datestamp, manuscript "X Paid", with original contents, 3c stamp with corner tear, couple backflap tears and some light soiling

AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE MIXED-FRANKING NORTHBOUND CIVILIAN FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER SENT VIA NORFOLK AND OLD POINT COMFORT. THE FEW MIXED-FRANKING COVERS KNOWN FROM THIS PERIOD REPRESENT THE EARLIEST POSSIBLE EXAMPLES OF MIXED UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES POSTAGE, WHICH WERE ONLY POSSIBLE FOR A BRIEF PERIOD.

Mixed-franking U.S.-Confederate States covers are rare and highly sought after by collectors. As a mixed franking on a civilian flag-of-truce cover, during the short window that some were allowed to use the Norfolk-Old Point Comfort route, this is an extremely important artifact of postal history. Shortly after this cover was mailed, civilian flag-of-truce mail sent north was diverted to the U.S. Dead Letter Office, per U.S. General Order No. 7. This order followed an announcement in the January 1862 U.S. Mail & Post Office Assistant that stated, "The facilities afforded by sending letters to the rebel states under a flag-of-truce are not intended, and cannot be permitted, to cover general correspondence."

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 90). Ex Walske. With 1993 A.P.S. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
274
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 274, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesSalisbury Prison, N.C, Salisbury Prison, N.CSalisbury Prison, N.C. Flag-of-truce cover from Massachusetts to James H. Griggs at Salisbury Prison, U.S. and C.S.A. postage prepaid with 3c Rose (65), straddle-pane margin, cancelled by grid with matching "Dedham Mass. May 20" (1862) circular datestamp and 5c Blue, Stone 2 (4), tied by blue "Petersburg Va. May 28" circular datestamp, docketing at left "Via Fortress Monroe Care of Gen. Wool", cover then turned and used with two 5c Blue, Stone 2 (4) (one with faults) and sent to Clarksville, Va., "Petersburg Va. Jul. 8" circular datestamp and "MISSENT" straightline, backflap missing and splits from showing cover opened (reinforced with hinges)

AN EXCEPTIONAL MIXED-FRANKING FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER SENT VIA FORTRESS MONROE AND PETERSBURG, MADE EVEN MORE DESIRABLE BY THE TURNED AND "MISSENT" USE.

When Federal troops occupied Norfolk on May 9, 1862, the C.S.A. flag-of-truce exchange point was moved up the James River to Aiken's Landing, Virginia, with the U.S. exchange point remaining across the Chesapeake Bay at Fortress Monroe. Aiken's Landing was used by the C.S.A. for only a short time, after which their exchange point was moved to City Point, Virginia. With the July 1862 implementation of the prisoner exchange cartel, prisoner populations were temporarily drastically reduced and flag-of-truce mail exchanges were virtually eliminated. Because of the very short period of time this route was in existence, covers sent via Petersburg are among the rarest of prisoner-of-war mail.

James H. Griggs was born in Dedham and served as a private in the Massachusetts 5th Infantry Regiment from May 1, 1861, to June 24, 1862, during which time he was captured and sent to Salisbury Prison. After exchange in late May 1862, he served with the 33rd Massachusetts Infantry Regiment from August 7, 1862, to March 19, 1863. Finally, he is listed as a commissioned officer in Company I of the 37th Regiment of U.S. Colored Infantry starting in 1864.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 68). Ex Seybold and Walske. With 1998 A.P.S. certificate

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 274, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesSalisbury Prison, N.C, Salisbury Prison, N.C
Image 2
E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
275
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 275, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesSalisbury Prison, N.C, Salisbury Prison, N.CSalisbury Prison, N.C. Flag-of-truce cover from Chief Engineer Joseph Parry at Salisbury Prison to his wife in Philadelphia Pa., C.S.A. postage paid by 5c Blue, Stone 2 (4) with two large margins, others cut in and lower left corner slightly clipped, U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), both stamps tied by "Salisbury N.C. Jun. 15, 1861 [1862]" circular datestamp (the year date is inverted and in error as usual), censored in pencil by both the U.S. ("Ex") and C.S.A. ("Ex NK"), some edgewear, slightly reduced and small opening nick at right, 3c perfs slightly trimmed as a result

FINE AND RARE. AN OUTSTANDING MIXED-FRANKING PRISONER'S FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER SENT VIA PETERSBURG AND OLD POINT COMFORT FROM THE PARRY CORRESPONDENCE.

Joseph L. Parry was chief engineer on the U.S. transport steamer Union when it ran aground on November 3, 1861, on the North Carolina coast. Parry was held at Salisbury Prison until his exchange in September, 1862. The Parry correspondence to and from the prison was described in two outstanding articles by Lawrence Lohr in the Confederate Philatelist in 1995 and 2008.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 69). Ex Hollowbush (who was Parry's grand godson), Keeling and Walske.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
276
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 276, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesSalisbury Prison, N.C, Salisbury Prison, N.CSalisbury Prison, N.C. Flag-of-truce cover from Dr. Charles Carroll Gray at Salisbury Prison to Geneva N.Y., C.S.A. postage paid by 5c Light Blue, De La Rue (6), two large margins, cut in at lower right, corner crease, tied by one of two strikes of "Salisbury N.C. Jun. 22, 1861 [1862]" circular datestamp with usual yeardate error, "Due 3" straightline handstamp for U.S. postage, endorsed "CC Gray US Army, Prisoner of War, Salisbury NC", manuscript "Examined Th H Holmes ADC" censor mark, small backflap tear, Very Fine, a rare P.O.W. use via Petersburg, Dr. Charles Carroll Gray was a U.S. Army medical officer who saw action at the First Battle of Bull Run (Manassas); upon his capture he spent time in Libby Prison in Richmond, Castle Pinckney in Charleston and Salisbury Prison; he was exchanged in July 1862; his fascinating 1861-1862 diary, housed at the University of North Carolina Library, contains detailed descriptions of prisoner medical conditions and social interactions between prisoners and guards; illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 63), ex Emerson, Cole and Walske.

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
Back to Top
277
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 277, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesPetersburg Va, Petersburg VaPetersburg Va. Flag-of-truce cover addressed to Julien C. Ruffin, a member of the famous Ruffin family, at Garysville Va., franked with 10c Milky Blue, Die B (12a), full margins to slightly cut in, beautiful shade from first printing, tied by blue "Petersburg Va. Jul. 5" (1863) circular datestamp, instructions at top in the hand of Capt. P. P. Oldershaw, Assistant Adjutant-General to Major General Thomas L. Crittenden, commander of the 21st Army Corps in the Department of the Cumberland, "Maj. Genl. Crittenden requests that the Pro Marshal will forward this the first opportunity. Oldershaw AAG", the back is endorsed "Approved, Office Prov Marshal Gen. Dept Cumberland, Wm. L. King Clk." (U.S. Provost Marshal's censor marking) and "Examined H.A.C." (C.S.A. censor marking), the Confederate examiner also wrote "Chg Box 589 HAC" on the front and the post office applied the 10c stamp, small piece out of flap and mucilage smears where sealed after censorship

VERY FINE. AN EXTRAORDINARY NORTH-TO-SOUTH FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER, WHICH ENTERED THE C.S.A. MAILS AT PETERSBURG FRANKED WITH A GENERAL ISSUE STAMP.

Aiken's Landing Va. (near Petersburg) was the regular exchange point for flag-of-truce mail from May to September 1862, when U.S. authorities stopped prisoners' mail exchange. Because Petersburg was the entry post office for flag-of-truce mail for only a few months, covers carried on this route are rare. This civilian flag-of-truce cover with Major General Crittenden's AAG's instructions to expedite delivery was carried in July 1863. By this time Union prisons filled up again, and prisoners' mail increased in volume. However, the exchange point had been moved to City Point Va., near Richmond (the entry point for C.S.A. mail). This North-to-South flag-of-truce cover was handled through the U.S. Provost Marshal's office and entered the C.S.A. postal system at Petersburg. The use of a Confederate stamp on a North-to-South flag-of-truce cover is unusual. Such covers typically show a due marking for C.S.A. postage.

Ex Walske

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 277, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesPetersburg Va, Petersburg Va
Image 2
E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
278
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 278, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesCivilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba -- The Aichel Correspondence, Civilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba -- The Aichel CorrespondenceCivilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba -- The Aichel Correspondence. Two folded letters from a German immigrant, Oskar Aichel, to his wife at home in Anderson C.H., South Carolina

A REMARKABLE PAIR OF LETTERS. THE FIRST TELLS OF THE WRITER'S IMPENDING JOURNEY ON A BLOCKADE RUNNER, WHILE THE SECOND IS AN EXTREMELY RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE USE FROM CUBA TO SOUTH CAROLINA VIA NEW YORK CITY, FORTRESS MONROE AND RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.

The first folded letter is datelined Wilmington N.C. Oct. 7, 1863, as Aichel is awaiting his departure on board the "Blockade Runner... Margaretha & Jessie" to be transported to Nassau and Havana, with 10c Green, Die B (12) tied by "Wilmington N.C." circular datestamp.

The second folded letter, headed "Fourth letter", is datelined "Habana, 22 Decemb. 1863" and written in English for the purpose of censoring. Aichel mentions he has been in Havana for one and a half months, describes the difficulty of finding work at reasonable wages and characterizes locals as "those mis-trusting vicious creoles." He closes by wishing his family a Merry Christmas. This letter is endorsed "By Flag of Truce" and was enclosed in an outer envelope (discarded at the exchange point), which carried it by steamer to New York City and from there to the exchange point through Old Point Comfort to Fortress Monroe in Virginia. The enclosed letter was censored and marked "Examined J. Cassels" (John Cassels, Captain and Provost Marshal), then sent by flag-of-truce boat to Richmond, where 10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12), large margins, was tied by "Richmond Va. Jan. 18" (1864) circular datestamp.

Both covers are in Very Fine condition. Letters originating outside the continental United States and carried into the Confederacy under a flag-of-truce are extremely rare -- far rarer, in fact, than blockade-run covers into Confederate ports. Two similar covers from the Aichel correspondence -- one with a faulty stamp, the other stampless -- were offered in our sale of the Kohn collection (Sale 382).

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 93). Ex Murphy and Walske

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 278, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesCivilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba -- The Aichel Correspondence, Civilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba -- The Aichel Correspondence
Image 2
E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
279
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 279, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesWashington D.C. to Fort Johnson, Charleston Harbor S.C, Washington D.C. to Fort Johnson, Charleston Harbor S.CWashington D.C. to Fort Johnson, Charleston Harbor S.C. Civilian flag-of-truce folded letter datelined "Georgetown Aug 17th 1864" to Charleston S.C., 10c Blue, Die A (11) with large margins pays C.S.A. postage from Richmond to Charleston, cancelled by "Richmond Va. Sep. 5" circular datestamp, advertised in Charleston with "2" handstamp, forwarded to Fort Johnson on James Island (within the mouth of Charleston Harbor) with 2c Brown Red (8), three large margins, slightly in at upper left and tiny pinhole, affixed partly overlapping 10c stamp, tied by "Charleston S.C. Sep. 24, 1864" circular datestamp, some minor soiling and stained spots

A FINE AND EXTRAORDINARY FLAG-OF-TRUCE AND INTRA-CITY FORWARDED USE WITH A RARE COMBINATION OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUES.

The letter is discreetly addressed to "Mr." James C. Reynolds at Charleston. Reynolds was, in fact, a Lieutenant with the 1st S.C. Artillery stationed at Fort Johnson. The sender, who would have known his status, probably used a civilian salutation to evade Federal interception of correspondence with an active Confederate officer, and may have even known where he was stationed but used the less specific Charleston address for the same reason. The letter was mailed under flag-of-truce from Georgetown, Washington D.C. to the Federal exchange point at Fortress Monroe inside another envelope with 3c U.S. postage, which was discarded. At Richmond the 10c C.S.A. stamp was tied by the Richmond circular datestamp and sent in the mails to Charleston. The Charleston post office did not recognize the addressee as a Confederate officer and advertised the letter, applying the "2" handstamp for the advertising fee. Lt. Reynolds likely sent the 2c fee, and, judging from a small pre-use pinhole in the 2c stamp, he probably pinned the stamp to his written directions to the Charleston post office. The "2" handstamp was obliterated with a grid and the 2c stamp was tied by the Charleston circular datestamp -- the charge for forwarding postage being only 2c because of the local forwarding. The combination of the 2c Jackson to pay the local forwarding charge with the flag-of-truce routing and the advertised "2" marking on a cover from the North to a C.S.A. officer, disguised as a purely civilian letter, makes this a most extraordinary artifact of Civil War postal history and probably unique.

Discussed by Stanley B. Ashbrook in his Special Service (p. 154) and in Weekly Philatelic Gossip (Feb and May 1953). Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 92). Ex Grant, Bogg, Keeling and Walske.

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
280
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 280, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesCanada to Georgia via the United States and Flag-of-Truce, Canada to Georgia via the United States and Flag-of-TruceCanada to Georgia via the United States and Flag-of-Truce. Orange-buff cover with printed "Stubbs' Hotel,/James McIntosh, Proprietor/Saint John, N.B." corner card, manuscript "For Flag of Truce via Fortress Monroe", envelope was contained in an outer cover which would have had postage and was discarded at the exchange point, exchanged via Fortress Monroe and Richmond and entered the C.S.A. mails with 10c Blue, Die B (12) tied by "Richmond Va. Dec. 12" (1863) circular datestamp, the original letter (in the University of North Carolina Library, photocopy accompanies and is shown here) is datelined St. John N.B. November 30, 1863, from C.S.A. Navy Lieut. George W. Gift to Ellen A. Shackelford in Cedar Springs Ga. Lieut. Gift used a pseudonym, but his handwriting is proven by other letters in his name, stamp with minor horizontal crease

VERY FINE. AN OUTSTANDING AND RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM CANADA TO GEORGIA VIA THE U.S. AND FORTRESS MONROE, SENT BY A CONFEDERATE NAVAL OFFICER ON A SECRET MISSION TO RAID THE FEDERAL PRISON AT JOHNSON'S ISLAND.

Lieut. George W. Gift, who eventually married the addressee, Miss Ellen Shackelford, was one of the officers who accompanied Captain John Wilkinson on a secret mission to Canada in October 1863 for the purpose of raiding the Federal prison at Johnson's Island, near Sandusky Ohio on Lake Erie. Wilkinson was a well-known Confederate blockade runner, commanding several vessels during the war and later writing a book about his experiences. The mission sailed on October 7 from Wilmington N.C. to Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the blockade runner Robert E. Lee, commanded by Wilkinson. The plan collapsed when one of the plotters revealed the mission and Union authorities were alerted. This cover was sent by Lieut. Gift while in Canada on the ill-fated mission. For a fascinating history of the mission see https://warfarehistorynetwork.com/2018/12/19/intelligence-confederate-spies-used-newspapers-to-communicate .

Ex Judd

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 280, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesCanada to Georgia via the United States and Flag-of-Truce, Canada to Georgia via the United States and Flag-of-Truce
Image 2
E. 4,000-5,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
281
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 281, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines10c Rose (5), 10c Rose (5)10c Rose (5). Bright color, full to large margins all around, tied by bold "Chattanooga Ten. Aug. 5, 1862" circular datestamp on turned prisoner's cover addressed to Mrs. Josephine Wilson at Atapulgus Ga., the inside originally contained $1.00 in gold held by yellow paper and addressed to a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, manuscript "By Flag of Truce via Fortress Monroe", censor markings "$1.00 in Gold Ex. M", number "199" and red "c" (courier or cash?)

VERY FINE. A FASCINATING AND PROBABLY UNIQUE USE OF THE 10-CENT ROSE LITHOGRAPH ON A TURNED FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER TO A CONFEDERATE PRISONER HELD AT JOHNSON'S ISLAND.

A genuine gold replacement coin accompanies the cover. Signed and with Ashbrook handstamp. Ex Walcott, Emerson, Murphy and Boshwit

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 281, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines10c Rose (5), 10c Rose (5)
Image 2
E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
282
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 282, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesMarine Hospital, S.C., "Charleston 600", Marine Hospital, S.C., "Charleston 600"Marine Hospital, S.C., "Charleston 600". Yellow inner prisoner-of-war cover to Castleton Vt., with original letter datelined "C.S. Military Prison Charleston S.C. August 2, 1864", prisoner's endorsement on front, censored with manuscript "Exd. HHR" (Capt. Hugh Hamilton Rogers, Provost Marshal's Office, Charleston), entered U.S. mails with "Port Royal S.C. Aug. 20, 1864" circular datestamp and "Due 3"

VERY FINE COVER FROM ONE OF THE 600 UNION OFFICERS HELD IN CHARLESTON UNDER FIRE FROM FEDERAL FORCES ON MORRIS ISLAND.

On June 13, 1864, U.S. Major General John Foster, in command of the Department of the South at Hilton Head S.C., received a message from C.S.A. Major General Samuel Jones, commander of C.S.A. forces at Charleston, that five generals and 45 field officers had been transferred as prisoners-of-war to Charleston, which was under bombardment of Federal batteries. Foster immediately retaliated by ordering an equal number of prisoners of the same grade to be brought south and exposed to Confederate guns from Charleston. These 50 C.S.A. prisoners were taken from Fort Delaware and delivered to Gen. Foster at Hilton Head. Gen. Jones immediately proposed an exchange.

Shortly after the “50” prisoner incident, 600 more Federal prisoners were brought to Charleston. In retaliation, approximately 600 C.S.A. prisoners were moved on the Crescent City to Morris Island near Charleston, arriving on September 7. They were held in open barracks as “human shields” under direct shelling from C.S.A. forces. After the stalemate, the “Immortal 600” C.S.A. prisoners were moved from Morris Island on October 23 and sent to Fort Pulaski, then back to Fort Delaware.

The officer who sent this letter was captured June 29, 1864, during the Wilson-Kautz cavalry raid at Stony Creek Va. His letter states in part "We moved from Macon last week and arrived here yesterday...There are six hundred prisoners here -- all officers". The "Charleston 600" were the U.S. prisoners for whom Union General John Foster retaliated by bringing the Confederate "Immortal 600" to Morris Island. This cover is especially desirable with the prisoner's letter and reference to the "six hundred."

Ex Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 1,500-2,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
283
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 283, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesOld Capitol Prison, Fort Pulaski and Andersonville Ga., "Immortal 600", Old Capitol Prison, Fort Pulaski and Andersonville Ga., "Immortal 600"Old Capitol Prison, Fort Pulaski and Andersonville Ga., "Immortal 600". Prisoner-of-war cover endorsed "C. D. McCoy, Capt., 25th Va. Infantry, Prisoner of War", to his wife at the University of Virginia, an "Immortal 600" cover prepared prior to the departure of the Crescent City for Charleston on Aug. 20, 1864, "Passed W.P. Wood Supt. Military Prison" examiner's circular handstamp from Old Capitol Prison struck before departure, manuscript "Exd HW" censor's marking (U.S. Brigadier General Henry W. Wessells), endorsed "For Flag of Truce Boat via Fortress Monroe" but not exchanged there, after the Immortal 600 were removed from Morris Island on October 23, 1864 and taken to Fort Pulaski Ga., the cover was mailed via Camp Sumter and the C.S.A. Post Office at Andersonville Ga., with 10c Blue, Die B (12) tied by faint strike of Andersonville Ga. dateless double-circle handstamp, scuff at top right where coin to pay Confederate postage was removed

VERY FINE. AN EXCEPTIONAL PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER WITH A RARE COMBINATION OF ELEMENTS, INCLUDING AN "IMMORTAL 600" PRISONER, AN OLD CAPITOL PRISON UNION CENSOR MARKING AND PASSAGE THROUGH THE NOTORIOUS ANDERSONVILLE PRISON TO ENTER THE CONFEDERATE MAILS.

In August 1864, approximately 600 Confederate prisoners were moved on the Crescent City to Morris Island near Charleston by Federal forces, arriving on the island on September 7. They were held in open barracks as "human shields" under direct shelling from Confederate forces in retaliation for Union prisoners being held in Charleston under shelling from U.S. forces, a continuation and escalation of the prior "50" prisoner and "Charleston 600" incidents. This cover was prepared and censored prior to the departure of the Crescent City, but it was not put into the mails until the prisoners had been transferred to Fort Pulaski Ga. It was delivered to Camp Sumter and mailed at Andersonville Ga. for transmission to Virginia.

Ex "Summit". With 2006 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 4,000-5,000
Future Sale
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284
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 284, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFort Pulaski, Ga., "Immortal 600", Fort Pulaski, Ga., "Immortal 600"Fort Pulaski, Ga., "Immortal 600". Buff inner prisoner-of-war cover to Liberty Hill S.C., endorsed "M. W. E. Johnson, Prisoner of War, Fort Pulaski", with photocopy of original letter datelined "Fort Pulaski Sunday morning Nov 20th 1864", "Savannah Geo. Nov. 20" with star circular datestamp and "10" due handstamp, unsealed for censoring, routed via Port Royal and then back to Savannah to enter C.S.A. mails, fresh and Very Fine use, in late October 1864 the "Immortal 600" prisoners from Morris Island, who had been exposed to mortar fire from their own Confederate batteries, were moved to Fort Pulaski at the mouth of the Savannah River, conditions were not much better there as they were forced to subsist on a near starvation diet, ex Kohn and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 750-1,000
Future Sale
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285
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 285, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFort Pulaski, Ga., "Immortal 600", Fort Pulaski, Ga., "Immortal 600"Fort Pulaski, Ga., "Immortal 600". Buff inner prisoner-of-war cover to Liberty Hill S.C., endorsed "W. E. Johnson, Prisoner of War" and "By Flag of Truce", with photocopy of original letter datelined "Fort Pulaski Geo Dec 28th 1864", red manuscript "Ex" censor mark, "Charleston SC Jan. 8" (1865) double-circle datestamp and large "10" C.S.A. due handstamp, unsealed for censoring, routed via Port Royal and Charleston, small inconsequential tear at right, Very Fine, this cover is from the same prisoner as the prior lot, in late October 1864, the "Immortal 600" prisoners from Morris Island, who had been exposed to mortar fire from their own Confederate batteries in Charleston, were moved to Fort Pulaski at the mouth of the Savannah River, conditions were not much better there as they were forced to subsist on a near starvation diet, illustrated and discussed in an article by Brian Green and Patricia Kaufmann in the 1971 American Philatelic Congress book, ex Kohn and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 750-1,000
Future Sale
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286
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 286, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFort Delaware, Delaware City, Fort Delaware, Delaware CityFort Delaware, Delaware City. Orange-buff prisoner-of-war cover to St. John, New Brunswick, endorsed at left "T. J. Prichett", cover unsealed for censor, "Prisoner's Letter, Fort Delaware, Del. Examined" censor's oval handstamp (Ty. I, known Apr.-Oct. 1864), four singles of 3c Rose (65), one with natural straight edge, overpay 10c rate to British North America by 2c, stamps tied by "Delaware City Del. Oct. 10" (1864) duplex datestamp and target cancels, red "U States" cross-border handstamp and "St. John N.B. OC 14, 1864" receiving backstamp, with original letter from Capt. T. J. Prichett of the 64th Ga. Volunteers, regarding a request for money

FRESH AND EXTREMELY FINE. A SPECTACULAR PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER TO NEW BRUNSWICK, BRITISH NORTH AMERICA -- ONE OF ONLY THREE RECORDED.

Thomas J. Pritchett was commissioned as an officer in Company B, Georgia 64th Infantry Regiment, on April 8, 1863. His letter is addressed to R. R. Bearden, who was employed by the British firm of S. Isaac Campbell & Co., which supplied vast amounts of materials to the C.S.A. during the war. They also operated some of the most enterprising blockade-runners during the war, delivering loads of supplies to the C.S.A. and returning to Europe with cotton. Only a handful of prisoners' covers are known addressed beyond the United States -- this is certainly among the most spectacular.

Illustrated in Antrim (p. 53) and Shenfield (p. 36). Ex Shenfield, Antrim, Simon and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 4,000-5,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
287
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 287, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesAndersonville Ga. (Camp Sumter), Andersonville Ga. (Camp Sumter)Andersonville Ga. (Camp Sumter). Cover to Dedham Mass. with original letter datelined "Confederate Prison Anderson Ga. March 6. 1864", endorsed "(via flag of truce)", with "Exd J.C.S." censor mark at top, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12), manuscript cancel "Mar 9" and tied by provisional "Andersonville Ga." circular handstamp with second strike to the right of the stamp, entered U.S. mails with "Old Point Comfort Va. Mar. 24" double-circle datestamp, "Due 6" circular handstamp for unpaid letter, bottom of stamp torn but complete

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL AND RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM A PRISONER AT ANDERSONVILLE SENT VIA RICHMOND AND OLD POINT COMFORT.

The Andersonville prison, officially known as Camp Sumter, was the largest Confederate military prison during the Civil War and the most dreaded by Union soldiers. On March 27, 1864, Captain Henry Wirz assumed command of the stockade. By the end of the war, 12,913 of the approximately 45,000 Union prisoners held there had died, mostly from starvation and disease. After the war, Wirz was charged with conspiracy and murder by Federal authorities. His trial was held in the Capitol building in Washington and presided over by Union General Lew Wallace. A number of former prisoners testified on conditions at Andersonville, many accusing Wirz of specific acts of cruelty (some of these accounts were later called into question by historians as exaggerated or false). The court also heard from Confederate officers and considered official correspondence from captured Confederate records. Wirz presented evidence that he pleaded to Confederate authorities to obtain more food and maintained that he tried to improve the conditions for the prisoners. Wirz was found guilty of murder and sentenced to death. On November 10, 1865, he was hanged in Washington at the site of the current Supreme Court building -- the only Confederate official to be tried, convicted and executed for war crimes during the Civil War.

Harrison lists two examiner markings from Andersonville in addition to "Exd. H.W." of Henry Wirz. The "J.C.S." marking is listed as used in February 1865 by an unknown censor. This cover shows that the officer who used those initials was censoring letters at least eleven months prior to February 1865.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 238). Ex Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
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288
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 288, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesLetterman General Hospital, Gettysburg Pa., Letterman General Hospital, Gettysburg Pa.Letterman General Hospital, Gettysburg Pa.. Buff prisoner-of-war cover from Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Little to his wife in Little's Mills N.C., endorsed "Flag of Truce from Prisoner of War" at lower left, manuscript "Examined, R. Bell Capt. & Prov. Mar." censor's mark, U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), tied by blue grid cancel, matching "Gettysburg Pa. 1863 Sep. 17" double-circle datestamp also just ties the stamp, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12), margins close, minor gum toning, tied by "Richmond Va. Sep. 25, 1863" circular datestamp

VERY FINE AND RARE MIXED-FRANKING COVER FROM THE PRISON HOSPITAL ESTABLISHED NEAR THE GETTYSBURG BATTLEFIELD AND SENT VIA FLAG-OF-TRUCE TO RICHMOND.

In the aftermath of the bloody battle of Gettysburg, approximately 22,000 soldiers of both armies required medical treatment, including thousands of wounded Confederate soldiers left behind as Lee began his retreat. Treatment of the wounded at Gettysburg was the responsibility of the Army of the Potomac. Dr. Jonathan Letterman, Medical Director for George G. Meade's Army issued orders on July 5, 1863, to establish a general hospital in the Gettysburg area and provide transportation and supplies to the site for treatment of the wounded. In his honor, the temporary hospital was named after him. The site chosen for the vast hospital camp was on the George Wolf Farm, roughly one and one-half miles east of Gettysburg on the York Pike. The hospital was ready by mid-July and staffed with a small army of surgeons, nurses, cooks, quartermaster and supply clerks while a detachment of infantry was detailed as camp guards to look after stores and hospitalized Confederate prisoners. Treated with equal care by the Union surgeons and nurses, the Confederate soldiers were later transported to northern prison camps before parole. Less than 100 patients remained at Camp Letterman by November 10 and it was officially closed a few weeks later. (from the National Park Service).

Benjamin Franklin Little was appointed captain in Company E, North Carolina 52nd Infantry Regiment, on April 28, 1862, and promoted to full lieutenant-colonel on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg. During Pickett’s Charge, Lt. Col. Little was severely wounded while leading his men and captured on the battlefield; his wound eventually led to amputation of an arm. After spending time at the Letterman Hospital at Gettysburg, he was transported on September 28 to West’s Building Hospital in Baltimore, then to Ft. McHenry Prison on October 22, 1863. Records show he was mustered out on August 30, 1864, at Gettysburg.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 235). Ex Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 3,000-4,000
Future Sale
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289
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 289, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesWest's Building Hospital, Baltimore Md, West's Building Hospital, Baltimore MdWest's Building Hospital, Baltimore Md. Buff prisoner-of-war cover from Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Little to his wife in Little's Mills N.C., endorsed "Flag of Truce -- Prisoner of War.", with prisoner's endorsement on back, U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), C.S.A. postage paid by pair of 5c Blue, Local (7), all stamps tied by blue target cancels, matching "Baltimore Md. Sep. 30 '63" double-circle datestamp (second strike at left edge) and clear "Richmond Va. Oct. 5, 1863" circular datestamp also ties 5c pair, which has minor soiling and edge nicks

VERY FINE. A GORGEOUS AND RARE MIXED-FRANKING PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER FROM WEST'S BUILDING HOSPITAL IN BALTIMORE IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG.

West's Building Hospital and Fort McHenry were used sparingly after the July 1863 Gettysburg campaign. Fort McHenry was principally used for prisoners in transit to other prisons, and West's Hospital cared for up to 250 wounded prisoners. Covers from either are scarce, with West's slightly rarer than Ft. McHenry. Only manuscript examined markings are known from these prisons, and they appear on only some of the mail. The principal identifying characteristic of southbound mail is a Baltimore postmark and entry into the C.S.A. mails at Richmond. Distinguishing between the Fort McHenry and West's Hospital can sometimes be done by examined markings, or in the case of this cover, by prisoners' service records.

Benjamin Franklin Little was appointed captain in Company E, North Carolina 52nd Infantry Regiment, on April 28, 1862, and promoted to full lieutenant-colonel on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg. During Pickett’s Charge, Lt. Col. Little was severely wounded while leading his men and captured on the battlefield; his wound eventually led to amputation of an arm. After spending time at the Letterman Hospital at Gettysburg, he was transported on September 28 to West’s Building Hospital in Baltimore, then to Ft. McHenry Prison on October 22, 1863. Records show he was mustered out on August 30, 1864, at Gettysburg.

Ex Walske.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
290
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 290, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md., Old Capitol Prison, Washington D.C, Fort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md., Old Capitol Prison, Washington D.CFort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md., Old Capitol Prison, Washington D.C. Buff prisoner-of-war cover from Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Little to his wife in Little's Mills N.C., originated at Ft. McHenry Prison, endorsed "Through bond's officer at Fortress Monroe, Va.", censored in transit at Old Capitol Prison in Washington D.C. by Lt. Charles W. Thompson with red "Approved by C.W.T. Lt.&A Provost Marshal, Washington D.C." examiner's handstamp (Ty. V) with the name in manuscript, endorsed on back "from B. F. Little, Capt. Co. E. 52nd Regt. N.C. Infty", mixed franking with U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), cancelled by quartered cork, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die A (11), three large margins to touched at top, pre-use crease, tied by "Richmond Va. Nov. 19, 1863" circular datestamp

VERY FINE AND RARE MIXED-FRANKING PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER FROM FORT McHENRY AND CENSORED AT OLD CAPITOL PRISON IN WASHINGTON D.C.

Benjamin Franklin Little was appointed captain in Company E, North Carolina 52nd Infantry Regiment, on April 28, 1862, and promoted to full lieutenant-colonel on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle of Gettysburg. During Pickett’s Charge, Lt. Col. Little was severely wounded while leading his men and captured on the battlefield; his wound eventually led to amputation of an arm. After spending time at the Letterman Hospital at Gettysburg, he was transported on September 28 to West’s Building Hospital in Baltimore, then to Ft. McHenry Prison on October 22, 1863. Records show he was mustered out on August 30, 1864, at Gettysburg.

The red Provost Marshal markings are usually found on covers with either U.S. or Confederate postage, but normally not both.

Illustrated in Antrim (p. 175). Ex Dr. Green and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 1,500-2,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
291
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 291, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md, Fort McHenry Prison, Baltimore MdFort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md. Prisoner-of-war cover from Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Little to his wife in Little's Mills N.C., endorsed "Via Flag of Truce" and "Through Comd'g Officer at Fortress Monroe", with prisoner's endorsement below, manuscript "Ex Geo haul Ast Pa?" examiner's marking, mixed franking with U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), tied by blue target cancel with matching "Baltimore Md. Dec. 21 '63" double-circle datestamp, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die A (11), slightly cut in from placement at top of cover, tied by "Richmond Va. Jan. 1" (1864) circular datestamp, cover with small edge tears, Very Fine mixed-franking flag-of-truce cover from Ft. McHenry, ex Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
Back to Top
292
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 292, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesFort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md, Fort McHenry Prison, Baltimore MdFort McHenry Prison, Baltimore Md. Prisoner-of-war cover from Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Little to his wife in Little's Mills N.C., mixed franking with 3c Rose (65), cancelled by blue target cancel with matching "Baltimore Md. Jan. 20, 1864" double-circle datestamp, endorsed "Through Comdg. Officer at Fortress Monroe from Prisoner of War B. F. Little Capt. Co. E 52nd N.C. Regt.," also "Flag of Truce" at top, censored "Examined F. Wiard Lt. & P Adjt.," C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die A (11), large margins, tied by partly clear strike of Richmond Va. circular datestamp, Very Fine mixed-franking flag-of-truce cover from Ft. McHenry, ex Wishnietsky, with 2014 P.F. certificate

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
Back to Top
293
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 293, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesPoint Lookout, Md, Point Lookout, MdPoint Lookout, Md. Buff prisoner-of-war cover to Milboro Springs Va., endorsed "Via Fortress Monroe Flag of Truce Boat", "Prisoner's Letter Examined." octagonal censor's handstamp (Ty. IIa), mixed franking with U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), cancelled by target and matching "Point Lookout Md. Aug. 5 '64" circular datestamp which ties pair 5c Blue, Local (7), also tied by overlapping "Richmond Va. Aug. 12" circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE. AN UNUSUALLY FRESH AND CHOICE POINT LOOKOUT MIXED-FRANKING FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER EXCHANGED THROUGH OLD POINT COMFORT AND RICHMOND.

Illustrated in Antrim (p. 77). Ex Walske and "Clovis".

Bid on this lot

E. 1,500-2,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
294
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 294, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesPoint Lookout, Md, Point Lookout, MdPoint Lookout, Md. Small incoming cover to prisoner-of-war from "Co. H, 14th Regt. Va. Cavalry" at Point Lookout, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die A (11), large margins, gum toning, tied by blue/ultramarine "Farmville Va." circular datestamp, U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), tied by bold quartered cork cancel with "Old Point Comfort Va. Feb. 23" double-circle datestamp, manuscript "LFP" censor's marking applied at Point Lookout, Extremely Fine, a beautiful mixed-franking flag-of-truce cover to Point Lookout routed via Richmond and Old Point Comfort, ex Dr. Green and Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
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295
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 295, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesCamp Davidson, Savannah Ga, Camp Davidson, Savannah GaCamp Davidson, Savannah Ga. Prisoner-of-war cover to Fall River Wis., endorsed "Sent by Capt M.C. Hobart, Prisoner of War, Savannah Ga." and "Via Flag of Truce", manuscript "Ex JH aag" (known Aug. 1864), mixed franking with C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12), tied by Savannah circular datestamp, used with 3c Rose (65), tied by target cancel and "Port Royal S.C. Sep. 5 '64" double-circle datestamp where it entered the U.S. mails, mended tear through cover and 10c stamp, some light staining at bottom

VERY FINE APPEARING AND RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM CAMP DAVIDSON, SENT VIA POCOTALIGO AND PORT ROYAL. APPROXIMATELY SIX ARE KNOWN.

Martin C. Hobart was 25 years of age when he enlisted in Company B, Wisconsin 7th Infantry Regiment (part of the famous "Iron Brigade") in 1861. Promoted to full colonel by the end of the war, he survived the war and prison and was mustered out on July 3, 1865. Camp Davidson, named for its first commander, was created from the old U.S. Marine Hospital to house Union commissioned officers in August 1864. Conditions were considered among the best of C.S.A. prisons, with shade and decent rations (Harrison p. 32). When the camp was liberated by Gen. Sherman in December 1864 after only five months of operation, it held 800 prisoners.

From July 1864 until February 1865, Union P.O.W. mail from Charleston, Savannah and Florence prisons was carried from Pocotaligo S.C. (on the Charleston & Savannah R.R. line) to Union-held Port Royal, S.C. Flag-of-truce mail via South Carolina is considerably rarer than flag-of-truce mail via Virginia. Most surviving covers are inner envelopes, but a few mixed-franking covers like this one are known. The route was closed by the Federal capture of Pocotaligo on January 14, 1865.

Illustrated in Special Routes book (p. 77). Ex Antrim and Walske.

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
296
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 296, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines5c Blue, Stone 2 (4), 5c Blue, Stone 2 (4)5c Blue, Stone 2 (4). Ample margins to slightly in, tied by Salisbury N.C. circular datestamp with unclear date on 1862 civilian flag-of-truce cover to Mrs. Mary Harkness in Washington D.C., neat manuscript "By Flag of Truce, United States postage enclosed" and "Care of Thomas F. Harkness, Esq", entered U.S. mails with 3c Rose (65) tied by "Old Point Comfort Jul. 12" double-circle datestamp, pencil "Exd JFW?" censor's marking, back panel with "If this is not permitted to pass the 'Lines', I desire it to be forwarded to Box No. 50, Salisbury, North Carolina", slight soiling including on left part of 5c stamp, 3c stamp with small internal crease

VERY FINE MIXED-FRANKING CIVILIAN FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM SALISBURY N.C. TO WASHINGTON D.C IN JUNE-JULY 1862. A RARE USE AFTER NEARLY ALL OF THIS MAIL WAS ELIMINATED WITH THE FALL OF NORFOLK.

Up until the fall of Norfolk on May 9, 1862, civilian flag-of-truce mail could be sent in an outer envelope with C.S.A. postage paid to the point of exchange (Norfolk and Fortress Monroe). The outer envelope was normally discarded at the exchange point and the inner envelope, addressed to the North, was postmarked at Old Point Comfort. In this case, the sender's note makes it clear that he enclosed the U.S. 3c stamp in the cover for application and cancellation at Old Point Comfort -- eliminating the need for separate outer and inner covers. This is a rare use in June-July 1862, as by this point nearly all civilian flag-of-truce mail was discontinued (until restarting in June 1863). The Salisbury datestamp is unclear but it must be a pre-July 1, 1862, use or the cover would have been paid 10c.

The "Care of Thomas F. Harkness, Esq" notation also appears on a "Southn. Letter Unpaid" cover from Salisbury N.C. to Washington D.C. Thomas F. Harkness was appointed as a letter carrier in Washington D.C. on August 30, 1849 (Chronicle 120, p. 243). He is responsible for the "H" cancellations on a 3c 1851 first day cover and on a number of U.S. Eagle Carrier covers from the early 1850s.

Ex Kilbourne

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
297
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 297, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines10c Blue, Paterson (2), 10c Blue, Paterson (2)10c Blue, Paterson (2). Large margins all around, used with 3c Rose (65) and tied by Knoxville Tenn. Union-occupation double-circle datestamp with unclear date (ca. 1863-64), both stamps also tied by target cancels on small cover addressed to Carter's Depot Tenn. with pencil "62d Tenn Regt" , manuscript "Per Flag of Truce" and "Via Fortress Monroe" (in different hands), also "Care of Col. Crawford", exchanged via Fortress Monroe and City Point-Richmond, 10c stamp tied by "Richmond Va. Sep. 11" circular datestamp, some soiling and small stain at lower left

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL AND EXTREMELY RARE MIXED FRANKING CIVILIAN FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER WITH THE 10-CENT PATERSON LITHOGRAPH AND U.S. 3-CENT 1861 ISSUE.

This is a fascinating use, both originating in and ending in Tennessee. It was sent from Union-controlled Knoxville to Fortress Monroe and Richmond, in order to reach Confederate East Tennessee. The distance between Knoxville and Carter's Depot (present-day Watauga, Tenn.) is a mere 125 miles, though this cover traveled much farther than that. Civilian flag-of-truce mail resumed in June 1863 with the exchange points Fortress Monroe-Old Point Comfort and City Point-Richmond.

The use of the Confederate 10c Blue Lithograph on any mixed-franking flag-of-truce cover with U.S. postage is extremely rare. Only one prisoner-of-war use is recorded (ex Walske, Siegel Sale 988, lot 190). This is the only civilian flag-of-truce use we have encountered with this combination.

Ex Kilbourne. With 1967 P.F. certificate issued to Charles Kilbourne (after private acquisition from an original find)

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
Back to Top
298
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 298, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesMobile Ala. to New Orleans by Flag-of-Truce, Mobile Ala. to New Orleans by Flag-of-TruceMobile Ala. to New Orleans by Flag-of-Truce. Small cover addressed to Miss Zoe Campbell on "Bourbon street bet. Conti & Bienville Streets, New Orleans La.", instructions "Be kind enough so as to forward it", back of cover with manuscript "Appd. JCDenis Pro. Ml" censor's marking applied by Mobile Provost Marshal Jules C. Denis, exchanged by flag-of-truce and endorsed by Union censor "Approved MMD Hd. Qrs. Defences N.O", "Due 3" straightline handstamp for U.S. postage, pencil receipt docketing "16 Octobre 1863 Vendredi", lightly soiled

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED COVER CARRIED BY FLAG-OF-TRUCE FROM THE CONFEDERACY INTO FEDERAL-OCCUPIED NEW ORLEANS.

Mail from the Confederate States to residents of New Orleans was generally discouraged. This is the first and only recorded example of such mail that was exchanged via the flag-of-truce route between Mobile and New Orleans. It was censored on both sides -- by Mobile Provost Marshal Jules C. Denis at Mobile and a Union censor at New Orleans.

The papers of Zoe Jane Campbell can be found at the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University: "871: Zoe Jane Campbell Papers, 1855-1898. 152 items. New Orleans, La. Principally family letters to Zoe Jane Campbell during the Civil War concerning Confederate Army matters such as troop movements, immorality among the soldiers, complaints against officers, soldiers' pay, and health conditions. There is considerable information on the U.S. military prisons at Elmira, New York, and at Belleville, Louisiana. Also included is material on social life and customs in New York and Washington, D.C., and on the internal disorders in northern Mexico in the late 1850's."

Ex Walske

Bid on this lot

Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 298, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesMobile Ala. to New Orleans by Flag-of-Truce, Mobile Ala. to New Orleans by Flag-of-Truce
Image 2
E. 1,000-1,500
Future Sale
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299
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 299, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesDistrict of East Tennessee Provost Marshal, District of East Tennessee Provost MarshalDistrict of East Tennessee Provost Marshal. Inner envelope with original letter datelined "Loudon Tennessee Apr 30th 1864", sent from U.S.-controlled Loudon (near Knoxville) to C.S.A.-controlled Kingsport Tenn., censored with embossed "Provost Marshal General of East Tennessee" seal and manuscript "Ex LA Gratz Maj & aaag", C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die A (11), uncancelled, the exchange point was Knoxville where Maj. Gratz was located, stamp with small edge faults from placement, light soiling and backflap partially split and reinforced

VERY FINE AND EXTREMELY RARE EXAMPLE OF THE EAST TENNESSEE PROVOST MARSHAL EMBOSSED SEAL. FEWER THAN FIVE EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN.

Provost marshals were military officers charged with the duties of making searches, seizures, and arrests, the custody of deserters and of prisoners of war, and the issuance of passes. Their duties also included the examination of letters to or from potentially disloyal persons. Two types of provost marshals were appointed during the Civil War. Each military district had a provost marshal whose duties were focused on maintaining order within the geographic confines of that district. In addition, each army had a provost marshal whose duties were more military in nature, such as taking temporary charge of captured prisoners and maintaining order in the army.

Virtually all examination of mail was performed by the district provost marshals. Both the U.S and C.S.A. district provost marshal organizations examined across-the-lines mail. In that context, they were responsible for P.O.W. mail, civilian flag-of-truce mail, blockade-run mail, and smuggled mail. A number of different manuscript provost marshal markings appear on through-the-lines covers as well as Union handstamped markings. The only district to use the rare embossed marking is the District of East Tennessee.

Illustrated in Harrison (p. 246) and Special Routes book (p. 98). Ex Walske

Bid on this lot

E. 2,000-3,000
Future Sale
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300
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 300, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines10c Blue, Paterson (2), 10c Blue, Paterson (2)10c Blue, Paterson (2). Large even margins, tied by bold "Little Rock Ark. Jun. 16" double-circle datestamp on orange-buff cover to McKinney Tex., manuscript "Approved Sebe Hatler Maj. Gen. Commanding one Sorel Horse", cover tear affects address and censor marking, otherwise Very Fine, Sebron Hatler was a member of Alf Johnson's Texas "Spy Company," a group of guerilla fighters who attacked U.S. forces around Little Rock beginning in May 1862, his notation on this cover to his wife is a sarcastic joke (there was never a "Major General Hatler"), ex Boshwit

Bid on this lot

E. 1,000-1,500
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301
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 301, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines, "Commodore Samuel Barron, Governor's Island, Care of Commanding Officer". Address on cover to Barron as prisoner of war, no postal markings, some slight edgewear, Very Fine, Commodore Samuel Barron left his powerful position as Chief of the Bureau of Detail in the U.S. Navy to become a C.S.A. Navy commander and chief of the Office of Orders and Details, he commanded the defense of both the forts Hatteras and Clark against U.S. Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham during the Battle of Hatteras Inlet in August 1861, Barron was captured following the surrender of the two fortresses and released in a prisoner exchange eleven months later, and served most of the rest of the war in France overseeing the building of blockade-running ships for the Confederacy

Bid on this lot

E. 500-750
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302
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 302, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the Lines, "S. Barron Esq. C.S.N. Fort Warren Mass." Address on cover to Barron as prisoner of war, manuscript "Ex. J.D." examiner's mark, cover tear at left, Very Fine appearance, Commodore Samuel Barron left his powerful position as Chief of the Bureau of Detail in the U.S. Navy to become a C.S.A. Navy commander and chief of the Office of Orders and Details, he commanded the defense of both the forts Hatteras and Clark against U.S. Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham during the Battle of Hatteras Inlet in August 1861, Barron was captured following the surrender of the two fortresses and released in a prisoner exchange eleven months later, and served most of the rest of the war in France overseeing the building of blockade-running ships for the Confederacy

Bid on this lot

E. 500-750
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303
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 303, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesOffice of the Provost Marshal General, Armies Operating Against Richmond, Va., Official Business, Office of the Provost Marshal General, Armies Operating Against Richmond, Va., Official BusinessOffice of the Provost Marshal General, Armies Operating Against Richmond, Va., Official Business. Imprint on cover addressed to Robert M. T. Hunter, a Confederate Senator, evidently as a prisoner on board the U.S. Gunboat Burnside, no other markings, Very Fine, a rare imprint and an even rarer use, Robert M. T. Hunter was a Confederate Senator (whose portrait is on a $10 Confederate bill) and was one of three members of the Confederacy who met with Lincoln and Seward at the Hampton Roads Peace Conference on February 3, 1865, he was arrested by Federal forces later in 1865 and imprisoned without trial at Fort Pulaski until 1866, the General Burnside was built in 1862 and sold to the War Department in 1863, she became flagship of the upper Tennessee River Fleet where she patrolled the river to Whitesburg, Decatur, and Chattanooga, this letter was likely sent to Hunter as a prisoner on his way to Fort Pulaski

Bid on this lot

E. 750-1,000
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304
c
Sale Number 1238, Lot Number 304, Formal Flag-of-Truce Mail Across the LinesRobert M. T. Hunter, Robert M. T. HunterRobert M. T. Hunter. 13 covers addressed to former Confederate Senator Hunter as a prisoner at Fort Pulaski Ga., including nine with 3c Rose (65), one with "Steamboat" handstamp, one adversity cover made from an illustrated envelope, several defective but still a worthwhile group, Robert M. T. Hunter was a Confederate Senator (whose portrait is on a $10 Confederate bill) and was one of three members of the Confederacy who met with Lincoln and Seward at the Hampton Roads Peace Conference on February 3, 1865, he was arrested by Federal forces later in 1865 and imprisoned without trial at Fort Pulaski until 1866

Bid on this lot

E. 750-1,000
Future Sale
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