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Sale 1191 — United States and CSA Postal History

Sale Date — Thursday, 25 October, 2018

Leave Absentee Bids
*A buyer’s premium of 18% of the winning bid was added as part of the total purchase price on all lots in this sale. Buyers were responsible for applicable sales tax, customs duty and any other prescribed charges. By placing a bid, bidders agreed to the terms and conditions in effect at the time of the sale.

Category — Trans-Continental Pony Express

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2076
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2076, Trans-Continental Pony Express10c Green, Ty. V (35), 10c Green, Ty. V (35)10c Green, Ty. V (35). Tied by target cancel applied on arrival in St. Joseph, bold strike of "Pony Express San Francisco Sep. 29" (1860) blue Running Pony oval datestamp, manuscript "Per Pony Express Sep 29 '60" directive at top of blue cover to Eugene Kelly at Fulton Street address in New York City, manuscript "1/4" (quarter ounce, $2.50 express charge), carried on the eastbound trip that left San Francisco on September 29, 1860, and arrived at St. Joseph on October 10, bold strike of "The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Oct. 10" oval datestamp which ties corner of stamp, "Saint Joseph Mo. Oct. 11" double-circle datestamp struck upon entering the mails to New York, half of back replaced along with small part of top right corner of cover, small portion of Running Pony marking drawn in, some slight staining

FINE APPEARANCE. A DESIRABLE EXAMPLE OF EASTBOUND PONY EXPRESS MAIL WITH ALL MARKINGS CLEARLY STRUCK AND A 10-CENT 1859 ISSUE FRANKING.

FKW Census E22. Trip ET-35. Illustrated in Ashbrook's Special Service on p. 274. Ex Krug and Walske. Signed Ashbrook. With 2006 P.F. certificate

E. 15,000-20,000
0
2077
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2077, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressPony Express, St. Joseph, Aug. 30 (1860), Pony Express, St. Joseph, Aug. 30 (1860)Pony Express, St. Joseph, Aug. 30 (1860). Mostly clear strike of Carmine Running Pony oval datestamp struck on back of cover, manuscript "Placerville Cal. Aug. 19" postmark and "Paid $2.50" in same hand on 10c Green on Buff Nesbitt entire (U16) to Fredonia N.Y., "Saint Joseph Mo. Aug. 31, 1860" circular datestamp struck upon entering the mails, expertly restored around edges with some paper extension at left, but the back with the Carmine Running Pony handstamp is original

FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF TEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE RUNNING PONY HANDSTAMP STRUCK IN CARMINE.

The St. Joseph Running Pony handstamp was normally struck in black. The Frajola-Kramer-Walske census records ten covers with this marking struck in the distinctive Carmine color. They are dated from August 12 to September 13, 1860, and all but two are struck on the backs of the covers. Six are eastbound trips. This cover was picked up as way mail along the route at the Placerville station and carried on the eastbound trip that left San Francisco on August 18, 1860, arriving in St. Joseph on August 30.

FKW Census E14. Trip ET-23. Ex Walske. With 1966 P.F. certificate

E. 10,000-15,000
0
Back to Top
2078
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2078, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressThe Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, San Francisco, Cal. Oct. 31 (1860), The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, San Francisco, Cal. Oct. 31 (1860)The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, San Francisco, Cal. Oct. 31 (1860). Blue oval datestamp struck over indicia of 10c Green on Buff Nesbitt entire (U16) to Henry Beers in New York City, manuscript "Per Pony Express" directive at top and "1/4" (quarter ounce, $2.50 express charge), clear strike of "The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Nov. 12" oval datestamp struck on arrival, "Saint Joseph Mo. Nov. 13" double-circle datestamp struck upon entering the mails to New York, missing backflap from rough opening and small repair at top

A FINE APPEARING EASTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER, CARRIED IN NOVEMBER 1860, THE MONTH LINCOLN WAS ELECTED AND THE NATION MOVED CLOSER TO CIVIL WAR.

This cover was carried on the Pony Express trip from San Francisco that left on October 31, 1860, and arrived in St. Joseph on November 12. While en route, six days before arrival in St. Joseph, Abraham Lincoln was elected president.

FKW Census E34. Trip ET-44. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Walske

E. 4,000-5,000
0
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2079
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2079, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressPony Express San Francisco Dec. 26 (1860), Pony Express San Francisco Dec. 26 (1860)Pony Express San Francisco Dec. 26 (1860). Blurry strike of blue Running Pony oval datestamp on 10c Green on White Nesbitt entire (U15) to Henry Beers in New York City, manuscript "Pony Express" directive at top and "1/4" (quarter ounce, $2.50 express charge), carried on 15-day winter trip that left San Francisco on December 26, 1860, and arrived in St. Joseph on January 10, 1861, backstamped "Pony Express, The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph Mo. Jan. 10" in green, "St. Joseph Mo. Jan. 12" double-circle datestamp struck upon entering mails to New York, pencil receipt docketing of January 14, backflap removed from rough opening which also tore off small portion of top, affecting the markings on front and back, a presentable Pony Express cover with the San Francisco Running Pony oval, FKW Census E50. Trip ET-60. Ex Walske

E. 1,500-2,000
0
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2080
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2080, Trans-Continental Pony Express"Pony Express", "Pony Express""Pony Express". Manuscript notation on blue folded letter datelined at San Francisco on October 27, 1860, addressed to Bordeaux, France, carried by Pony Express under cover (so no express markings) to St. Joseph on the trip that departed San Francisco October 27 and arrived St. Joseph November 8, carried to New York to forwarder Hargous & Co. (oval forwarder's handstamp) and entered mails with "New York 3 Nov. 13" debit datestamp, sailed on the Cunarder Europa, departing Boston November 14, 1860 and arriving Queenstown November 25, "8" decimes due in France

VERY FINE. AN OUSTANDING COVER FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO FRANCE, CARRIED UNDER COVER BY THE PONY EXPRESS FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO ST. JOSEPH, MISSOURI.

Trip ET-43. Ex Walske

E. 2,000-3,000
4,250
Back to Top
2081
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2081, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressPony Express, The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Aug. 8 (1861), Pony Express, The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Aug. 8 (1861)Pony Express, The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Aug. 8 (1861). Large oval within circle datestamp on cover with "M. S. Latham U.S.S." free frank and his directive "Pony Express", to George Wallace, secretary to Governor Downey of California, at Sacramento -- pencil forwarding to San Francisco -- with letter datelined "Washington D.C. 31st July, 1861" from a military officer applying for appointment as lieutenant-colonel to organize a regiment to protect the overland mail route against Confederate forces, carried on the Pony Express trip that left St. Joseph on August 8, 1861, arriving San Francisco August 19.

VERY FINE COVER WITH A CLEAR STRIKE OF THE ST. JOSEPH SPECIAL “PONY EXPRESS” DATESTAMP AND FREE FRANK OF SENATOR MILTON LATHAM. ONE OF SIX RECORDED PONY EXPRESS COVERS FRANKED BY LATHAM AND A FASCINATING MILITARY AND OVERLAND MAIL ROUTE CONNECTION DURING THE EARLY MONTHS OF THE CIVIL WAR.

The letter states (in part): "I think I can safely assert California will soon be called upon for a Brigade of 5000 men, to proceed to Texas, via the Gadsend Purchase (Arizona) [sic] to reestablish the authority and laws of the U.S. & to occupy that State...it is the Lieut. Colonelcy of the Regiment to protect the overland route I want. I do not wish to go to Texas."

Senator Milton S. Latham went to California in 1850 and was elected to Congress on the 1852 Democratic ticket. After his term expired, he declined to run for re-election and served as collector for the port of San Francisco. In 1859 he was elected governor, but he resigned five days after taking office to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant when Senator David C. Broderick was killed in a duel. The addressee, George Wallace, was secretary to California governor, John Downey.

Senator Latham was a friend of William H. Russell, the Central Overland California & Pike’s Peak Express Co. president, and a strong supporter of COC&PP in their effort to secure the contract for the Central Route. He was among the few individuals later permitted to send Pony Express letters free of charge. In this case Senator Latham’s free frank applied to the $1.00 Pony Express rate, Wells, Fargo & Co.’s 10c charge for service between Placerville and San Francisco, and 10c U.S. postage (for a total of $1.20). There are 15 recorded Pony Express covers with any form of free frank for postage or express charges. Of these, six are signed by Latham (FKW E94, W3, W5, W7, W48 and W62). The eastbound cover (E94) has the San Francisco Running Pony oval. Three of the westbound Latham covers have the St. Joseph Running Pony oval (W3, W5 and W7), and two have the oval within circle datestamp (W48 and W62).

FKW Census W48. Trip WT-129. Ex Hall and Walske. With 2001 P.F. certificate

E. 15,000-20,000
0
Back to Top
2082
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2082, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressPony Express St. Joseph Sep. 27 (1860), Pony Express St. Joseph Sep. 27 (1860)Pony Express St. Joseph Sep. 27 (1860). Beautifully clear strike of Running Pony oval datestamp, red "California Pony Express Paid" oval struck over indicia of 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) originating in New York City and addressed to Crosby & Dibblee in San Francisco, manuscript "Pony Express Paid" with faint pencil "5.00" for double rate

VERY FINE. A WONDERFULLY CHOICE WESTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH A CLEAR STRIKE OF THE ST. JOSEPH RUNNING PONY OVAL.

This cover, originating in New York City, was carried on the westbound trip that left St. Joseph on September 27, 1860, and arrived in San Francisco on October 7. It demonstrates the under-3,000 miles "loophole" that allowed westbound mail to be sent in bundles from the East Coast to St. Joseph by mail with only 3c U.S. postage. This loophole was closed by the Act of February 27, 1861, which eliminated the mileage provision and required 10c on any letter crossing the Rocky Mountains.

Crosby & Dibblee was a large shipping firm that operated in San Francisco from 1852 to 1862. Charles W. Crosby and Albert Dibblee both arrived in San Francisco in 1850. Crosby had worked as a dry goods clerk in Boston. After accumulating a fortune in California, he moved to New York City in the 1860s. Albert Dibblee was born in upstate New York and worked for the State Bank of New York before emigrating to California in 1850. In addition to his business activities, Dibblee was a member of the Vigilance Committee of 1856.

FKW Census W15. Trip WT-39. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Walske

E. 30,000-40,000
0
Back to Top
2083
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2083, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressThe Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Oct. 11 (1860), The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Oct. 11 (1860)The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Oct. 11 (1860). Clear strike of oval datestamp, red "California Pony Express Paid" oval struck over indicia of 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) originating in New York City and addressed to Crosby & Dibblee in San Francisco, manuscript "Pony Express Paid" with pencil "5.00" for double rate, expert repair at top

VERY FINE APPEARING WESTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER AND RARE USE OF 3-CENT STAR DIE ENTIRE.

This cover, originating in New York City, was carried on the westbound trip that left St. Joseph on October 11, 1860, and arrived in San Francisco on October 21. It demonstrates the under-3,000 miles "loophole" that allowed westbound mail to be sent in bundles from the East Coast to St. Joseph by mail with only 3c U.S. postage. This loophole was closed by the Act of February 27, 1861, which eliminated the mileage provision and required 10c on any letter crossing the Rocky Mountains.

Crosby & Dibblee was a large shipping firm that operated in San Francisco from 1852 to 1862. Charles W. Crosby and Albert Dibblee both arrived in San Francisco in 1850. Crosby had worked as a dry goods clerk in Boston. After accumulating a fortune in California, he moved to New York City in the 1860s. Albert Dibblee was born in upstate New York and worked for the State Bank of New York before emigrating to California in 1850. In addition to his business activities, Dibblee was a member of the Vigilance Committee of 1856.

FKW Census W18. Trip WT-43. Ex Walske

E. 5,000-7,500
4,000
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2084
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2084, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $2.00 Red (143L1), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $2.00 Red (143L1)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $2.00 Red (143L1). Large margins to clear, light pre-use diagonal creasing and tiny tear, tied by blue "Pony Express San Francisco May 11" (1861) Running Pony oval handstamp on 10c Green on Buff Star Die entire (U33) to Dr. M.J. Pimentel in Boston Mass., blue "PAID" in oval handstamp, green "St. Joseph Mo. May 24" circular datestamp also ties stamp, missing backflap

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF THE $2.00 PONY EXPRESS STAMP TIED BY THE BLUE SAN FRANCISCO RUNNING PONY OVAL ON AN EASTBOUND COVER.

This cover was carried on the Saturday, May 11, 1861, trip from San Francisco, which arrived at St. Joseph on May 23. When Phase II (Interim Phase) started on April 1, 1861, the rate for a Pony Express letter was substantially reduced to $2 per half-ounce, down from the $5 per half-ounce or $2.50 per quarter-ounce rates in effect during the previous year. At the same time, the new agents--Wells, Fargo & Company--had special stamps and envelopes printed for use on Pony Express letters. The $2 rate was in effect for a brief period, from April 1 to June 30, 1861. The FKW census records 37 $2.00 Red covers.

The $2 and $4 were printed in sheets of 20 (5 wide by 4 high). Rather than build up the printing stone from intermediate transfer groups or from a primary matrix containing the denomination, the printers used a blank matrix to enter each subject on the stone for each value. This required a total of 40 transfers (20 for each value). The denomination (shaded numerals "2" and "4") then had to be individually transferred to each subject on both stones, thus requiring another 40 separate transfers. It seems incredible that experienced lithographers such as Britton & Rey did not simplify the process by using intermediate transfers. Based on the fact that the $2 and $4 of the July 1861 issue (in Green and Black) were printed from the same stones as the April 1861 issue, it is certain that the printers had retained the two original stones. Lithographic stones were usually re-used by erasing the image and repolishing the surface, but in the case of the Pony Express stones, they were evidently preserved for future printings.

FKW Census E74. Trip ET-99. Ex Walske. With 1980 P.F. certificate

E. 20,000-30,000
0
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2085
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2085, Trans-Continental Pony Express, "Express Business, Free, Jos. Roberson"--Pony Express Free Frank (July 10, 1861). Free frank and endorsement by Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Co. agent Joseph Roberson to Nat Stein at the COC&PPE office at St. Joseph Mo., endorsed "Pony Express" on cover front with backflap, original letter datelined "Fort Bridger July 10, 1861", letter states (in part): "I am now in the first regular Overland" (first daily overland stage from California), also "I forgot to tell you that two of the cuts of the Stage Coach and two of the pony were at the West office. Please get them for fear the job office may be confiscated.", cover with minor cosmetic edge improvements

VERY FINE. A RARE AND DESIRABLE PONY EXPRESS COVER, FREE FRANKED BY JOSPEH ROBERSON, WITH ORIGINAL CONTENTS AND CARRIED AS A WAY LETTER ON AN EASTBOUND PONY TRIP IN JULY 1861.

This was picked up at Fort Bridger by the Pony Express trip that left San Francisco on July 3, 1861, and arrived at St. Joseph on July 15. This was the first trip of the fourth rate period, though the rate was immaterial in this case since it was free franked. Pony Express letters on company business and from U.S. senators were carried free of any express or postal charges.

Joseph Roberson was born in Missouri about 1840, lived in Tennessee and was a pioneer expressman. He was head clerk for Pony Express founders Russell, Majors and Waddell, and when this letter was written he was agent for the Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company. He was subsequently an officer with Wells, Fargo & Co. His wife, Emily, nee Lofland, wrote a manuscript titled History of the Pony Express, which was published in the San Francisco newspaper California Spirit of the Times in 1879. Mrs. Roberson lived until 1943.

FKW Census EX1 (listed without known date as the letter that accompanies was not reunited with the cover until after the book was published). Trip ET-114.

Cover is ex Dr. Robertson and Walske

E. 10,000-15,000
0
Back to Top
2086
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2086, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Ample margins to slightly in at bottom, deep rich color, tied by blue "Pony Express San Francisco Aug. 3" (1861) Running Pony oval datestamp on 10c Green on Buff Star Die entire (U33) with Wells, Fargo & Co. red printed frank, addressed to Westfield Mass., entered regular mails with "New-York Aug. 18" circular datestamp, forwarded to Saratoga Springs N.Y. with 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), grid cancel and "Westfield Ms. Aug. 20, 1861" circular datestamp, manuscript July 21 receipt on back, inconsequential horizontal file bend does not affect stamps or markings

EXTREMELY FINE. AN OUTSTANDING EASTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH THE $1.00 RED HORSE & RIDER STAMP AND 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE FOR FORWARDING POSTAGE, IN EXCEPTIONALLY CHOICE CONDITION.

Commencing July 1, 1861, the Pony Express was authorized by Congress to carry mail at the rate of $1.00 per half ounce. An additional fee was charged by Wells, Fargo & Co. to carry mail from San Francisco to the western terminus at Placerville, which is represented by their red printed frank on this entire. The contract also stipulated the mandatory U.S. postage charge of 10c per half ounce. This cover combines all three postage elements plus the additional element of a 3c 1857 stamp for forwarding postage. It was carried on the August 3, 1861 eastbound Pony Express trip after the new rates and stamps were introduced.

Although the Scott Catalogue lists the July 1861 issue Pony Express stamps (143L3-143L6) with other private post issues, we wish to emphasize that these stamps were issued under the terms of a government mail contract; therefore, they have semi-official status.

FKW Census E133. Trip ET-123. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Walske. With 2006 P.F. certificate

E. 30,000-40,000
30,000
Back to Top
2087
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2087, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Large margins to just in at right, affixed over "PAID" in oval handstamp applied by Wells, Fargo & Co. office, tied by blue "Pony Express San Francisco Oct. 5" (1861) Running Pony oval datestamp on 10c Green on Buff Nesbitt Die entire (U33) addressed to Miss Ellen F. Cooper, care of General Cooper, Charlestown Mass, with Wells, Fargo & Co. red printed frank, manuscript "Per Pony Express" and "Oct. 2, 1861 Recd San Francisco October 4, 1861" written before stamp was affixed and cover was sent by Pony Express (it must have originated outside of San Francisco), entered mails with "Atchison Kan. Oct. 19" double-circle datestamp, small edge tears and opened on three sides

VERY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL EASTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH THE $1.00 RED HORSE & RIDER ISSUE. A RARE USE VIA THE ATCHISON POST OFFICE.

This cover to Ellen F. Cooper was probably sent by her future husband, E.W. Chapin. Commencing July 1, 1861, the Pony Express was authorized by Congress to carry mail at the rate of $1.00 per half ounce. An additional fee was charged by Wells, Fargo & Co. to carry mail from San Francisco to the western terminus at Placerville, which is represented by their printed frank on this entire. The contract also stipulated the mandatory U.S. postage charge of 10c per half ounce. This cover nicely combines all three postage elements and was carried on the October 5, 1861 eastbound Pony Express trip, arriving Atchison, Kansas, on October 19. By September 1861 the transcontinental railroad had reached Atchison, which became the post-office entry point for Pony Express mail.

Although the Scott Catalogue lists the July 1861 issue Pony Express stamps (143L3-143L6) with other private post issues, we wish to emphasize that these stamps were issued under the terms of a government mail contract; therefore, they have semi-official status.

FKW Census E171. Trip ET-141. Ex Walske. With 2006 P.F. certificate

E. 15,000-20,000
0
Back to Top
2088
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2088, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Ample margins to slightly in at bottom corners, tied by slightly blurry strike of blue "Wells, Fargo & Co. Gold Hill N.T. Sep. 24" (ca. 1863) oval datestamp on sealed 3c Pink on Buff entire (U35) with Wells, Fargo & Co. black printed frank, paste-up use without address (see below for explanation), most of the brown adhesive on back remains (confirming paste-up use), part of flap missing due to removal from the larger envelope to which it was pasted

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED USE OF A WELLS, FARGO & CO. 1861 $1.00 TRANSCONTINENTAL PONY EXPRESS STAMP ON A VIRGINIA CITY PONY EXPRESS COVER. A FASCINATING POSTAL HISTORY RARITY.

Following the termination of the transcontinental Pony Express in October 1861, Wells, Fargo & Co., in August 1862, established a supplemental service to their normal express business between San Francisco and Virginia City, Nevada Territory (in the Washoe mining area). The Virginia City Pony Express used horses to carry mail from Virginia City to Placerville, where it was put on a train to Sacramento and then on a steamboat to San Francisco. The service significantly cut the time for carriage of letters by this route. Wells, Fargo & Co. issued adhesive stamps for the service, which at first cost 10c per letter and then 25c beginning in February 1863 (Scott Nos. 143L7-143L9). The stamps were of the same Horse & Rider design as the dollar-value stamps used for the earlier transcontinental Pony Express service.

When the cover offered here was sent, the single rate via Virginia City Pony Express was 25c. Gold Hill was on the Virginia City route and that office's datestamp was used to cancel the $1.00 stamp. The most logical explanation is that this 3c entire was pasted to a larger plain envelope with heavy contents. The blurred Gold Hill oval datestamp is consistent with being struck on something softer than a single letter. The larger cover would have had the address and an additional 9c in U.S. postage for the quadruple rate. In order to pay the quadruple Virginia City Pony Express rate, the sender (or agent at Gold Hill) affixed a leftover 1861 $1.00 Pony Express stamp, rather than four Virginia City 25c stamps. In theory, remainders in the hands of Wells, Fargo & Co. agents could have been used for multiple rates on the Virginia City route. Theory has become reality with the emergence of this Virginia City cover. It is the only known cover franked with the 1861 $1.00 Pony Express stamp paying the 1862-65 Virginia City express rate. It is also the only cover recorded with a dollar-value Pony Express stamp that was not used on the transcontinental Pony Express route. We are grateful to Richard Frajola for his assistance in interpreting this cover.

With 2018 P.F. certificate

E. 3,000-4,000
2,200
Back to Top
2089
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2089, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, ($1.00) Red Type II East-to-West Frank, 10c Green on Thin Hard White Entire (unlisted in Scott), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, ($1.00) Red Type II East-to-West Frank, 10c Green on Thin Hard White Entire (unlisted in Scott)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, ($1.00) Red Type II East-to-West Frank, 10c Green on Thin Hard White Entire (unlisted in Scott). Boldly struck “New-York Oct. 5” (1861) circular datestamp and duplex grid cancel, printed address to the “Agent of Pony Express, St. Joseph, Mo.” and handwritten address to Thomas S. Fiske & Co., Bankers in Sacramento Cal., clear strike of “Pony Express, The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Oct. 10” large oval in circle datestamp applied before departure on October 10 westbound Pony trip, couple small nicks at top are inconsequential

VERY FINE. ONE OF 21 RECORDED TYPE II EAST-TO-WEST PONY EXPRESS ENTIRES AND ONE OF THE LAST TRIPS BEFORE THE END OF THE PONY EXPRESS ERA.

In Rate Period 3, Wells Fargo & Co. introduced a special franked envelope for westbound mail, but its use was extremely limited. On July 1, 1861, the new contract rate went into effect. On August 12, 1861, Wells Fargo & Co. announced in the New York papers that “Pony Express Envelopes” were “Now ready and for sale at our office.” Although this announcement refers only to “envelopes,” in fact both the franked entires and $1.00 adhesive stamps were put on sale in August 1861. The 1861 10c “Pumpkin” entire with the Type II printed frank was ordered from George F. Nesbitt & Co. (New York) by the Overland Mail Company after they obtained approval for the design and imprint from the Postmaster General’s office. The earliest recorded Type II envelope is dated August 14, 1861, according to the FKW census.

Based on a newspaper article in the San Francisco Bulletin (September 13, 1861, at http://www.siegelauctions.com/2013/1038/20_SFB.jpg ), the Type II franked envelopes were problematic, because eastern post offices were sometimes sending them in the “through” mail to San Francisco, instead of directing them to St. Joseph for the Pony Express. As a result, they would arrive by regular mail ten days after the Pony Express for which they were intended. This might explain why some examples of the Type II franks are found without a St. Joseph Pony Express handstamp. The presence of the St. Joseph Pony Express datestamp confirms that this was carried by Pony Express riders.

This October 5, 1861, cover was sent from New York City shortly before Civil War demonetization of the old stamp issue began and the new 1861 Issue was released. It entered the post office and was treated as regular mail until it reached the Wells, Fargo & Co. agent at St. Joseph. From there it made the October 10 westbound Pony trip to California, arriving in San Francisco from Placerville on October 22.

The updated FKW census lists 21 examples of the Type II $1.00 frank, including some that have stamps added or have been extensively repaired.

FKW Census W61. Trip WT-147. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Walske

E. 30,000-40,000
0
Back to Top
2090
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2090, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, ($1.00) Red Type II East-to-West Frank, 10c Green on Thin Hard White Entire (unlisted in Scott), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, ($1.00) Red Type II East-to-West Frank, 10c Green on Thin Hard White Entire (unlisted in Scott)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, ($1.00) Red Type II East-to-West Frank, 10c Green on Thin Hard White Entire (unlisted in Scott). Clearly struck “New-York Aug. 15” (1861) circular datestamp and duplex grid cancel, printed address to the “Agent of Pony Express, St. Joseph, Mo.” and handwritten address to Mr. J. C. Johnson in San Francisco, some edge and corner wear

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF 21 RECORDED TYPE II EAST-TO-WEST PONY EXPRESS ENTIRES.

In Rate Period 3, Wells Fargo & Co. introduced a special franked envelope for westbound mail, but its use was extremely limited. On July 1, 1861, the new contract rate went into effect. On August 12, 1861, Wells Fargo & Co. announced in the New York papers that “Pony Express Envelopes” were “Now ready and for sale at our office.” Although this announcement refers only to “envelopes,” in fact both the franked entires and $1.00 adhesive stamps were put on sale in August 1861. The 1861 10c “Pumpkin” entire with the Type II printed frank was ordered from George F. Nesbitt & Co. (New York) by the Overland Mail Company after they obtained approval for the design and imprint from the Postmaster General’s office. The earliest recorded Type II envelope is dated August 14, 1861, according to the FKW census (one day earlier than this cover).

Based on a newspaper article in the San Francisco Bulletin (September 13, 1861, at http://www.siegelauctions.com/2013/1038/20_SFB.jpg ), the Type II franked envelopes were problematic, because eastern post offices were sometimes sending them in the “through” mail to San Francisco, instead of directing them to St. Joseph for the Pony Express. As a result, they would arrive by regular mail ten days after the Pony Express for which they were intended. This might explain why some examples of the Type II franks are found without a St. Joseph Pony Express handstamp. Assuming this went to St. Joseph, it was carried on the Pony Express trip that left August 18, 1861 and arrived in San Francisco on August 31.

The updated FKW census lists 21 examples of the Type II $1.00 frank, including some that have stamps added or have been extensively repaired.

FKW Census W51. Trip WT-132. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Walske

E. 5,000-7,500
0
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2091
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2091, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressLondon to San Francisco Oct-Nov. 1861--Carried Outside Mails into New York City, Arrived after End of the Pony Express, London to San Francisco Oct-Nov. 1861--Carried Outside Mails into New York City, Arrived after End of the Pony ExpressLondon to San Francisco Oct-Nov. 1861--Carried Outside Mails into New York City, Arrived after End of the Pony Express. Blue folded letter from Joseph White datelined "London 19th Oct. 1861", addressed to James Wilson of White & Wilson in San Francisco with bold manuscript directive "P Pony Express/Overland via St. Joseph", dateline also contains "p Europa & Pony Express", carried outside the mails to New York City where received by Napier & Welsford forwarders (blue oval on flap), the last westbound trip of the Pony Express had departed St. Joseph on October 24, too late for this letter, so it was placed into the regular overland mails with 10c Dark Green, First Design, and 1c Blue (62B, 63), the 1c to pay the carrier fee to the post office, tied together by duplex target cancel and "New-York 3 Nov." double-circle datestamp, "Pony Express" crossed out and re-routed "Overland via St. Joseph" and carried by stage to San Francisco, Dec. 5 receipt docketing inside letter

VERY FINE. A FASCINATING LETTER FROM LONDON TO SAN FRANCISCO, INTENDED FOR AND DIRECTED TO THE PONY EXPRESS, BUT ARRIVING IN NEW YORK TOO LATE FOR THE LAST PONY TRIP AND CARRIED IN THE REGULAR OVERLAND MAILS. EVEN MORE DESIRABLE WITH THE SCARCE 10-CENT 1861 FIRST DESIGN.

The contents of the letter make it clear that the sender and his addressee were well familiar with and users of the Pony Express. Joseph White mentions a letter he received from James Wilson by Pony Express and directs that this letter (a copy, the other was sent via the West Indies) be forwarded from New York to St. Joseph and carried by the Pony Express. With the completion of the transcontinental telegraph, the Pony Express was shut down, the last trip leaving St. Joseph on October 24, 1861, one week before this letter arrived in New York (via the Cunarder Europa on November 1). Carried via the overland stage, this letter reached San Francisco on December 5, after a 32-day journey from New York -- significantly slower than the typical 15-day journey via the Pony Express.

Ex Walske. With 2004 P.S.E. certificate

E. 3,000-4,000
2,600
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