Sale 1146 — U.S. and Confederate States Postal History

Sale Date — Thursday, 15 December, 2016

Leave Absentee Bids
*A buyer’s premium of 15% of the winning bid was added as part of the total purchase price on all lots in this sale. Buyers were responsible for applicable sales tax, customs duty and any other prescribed charges. By placing a bid, bidders agreed to the terms and conditions in effect at the time of the sale.

Category — Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
1116
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1116, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Burlington N.J., 1774) "Burlington 4". Magenta manuscript postmark and rate on folded cover to Captain Gamble, Asst. Quartermaster General at New York, endorsed "On his Majesty's Service", "19/AU" Franklin mark struck on back, age toned file fold and splits, otherwise Fine, dated prior to the start of the American Revolution, Captain Gamble served in the British army as Assistant Quartermaster General, the Burlington marking is rare

E. 300-400
150
1117
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1117, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Boston, 1775). Folded letter datelined "Boston Dec. 12, 1774" (in error, should be 1775) with manuscript "dwt 2" rate, addressed to Portsmouth N.H., docketed on flap Dec. 12, 1775 in disagreement with the dateline, letter mentions that Parliament will soon enact a law to blockade all the harbors on the Continent (the British Prohibitory Act, passed in late 1775 mandated the first phase of the full blockade, beginning in March 1776), some internal splits, otherwise Very Fine, Calvet N. Hahn attributed this to the Goddard Constitutional Post

E. 500-750
1,000
Back to Top
1118
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1118, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Georgetown Md., 1775) "GEORGE*TOWN*S JAN:31". Mostly clear strikes of separate town and date straightline handstamps on back of folded letter datelined "Georgetown Jany. 31st 1775" to Philadelphia, manuscript "2" (dwt) rate and magenta "1/-" in local currency (2dwt=6p x 1.67 inflation factor=10p plus 2p carrier fee or or 1sh),

VERY FINE AND RARE EXAMPLE OF THE COLONIAL GEORGETOWN STRAIGHTLINE POSTMARK. FEWER THAN FIVE ARE RECORDED.

Although the "GEORGE*TOWN*S" straightline was once thought to be from South Carolina, it is now generally accepted that the marking was used at Georgetown, Maryland, shortly before the transition from the British Parliamentary Post system to the Congressional Post. Siskin reported only two covers with this straightline marking. We sold a third in our 2007 sale of covers from the Pennsylvania Historical Society.

E. 2,000-3,000
2,400
Back to Top
1119
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1119, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(New London Conn., 1775) "NEW*LONDON MAR 2". Two partly clear strikes of straightline handstamp, one showing the "*" between the two words, straightline date handstamp separate and below the town markings, manuscript "Dwt 2/ grs ." for 2dwt rate on folded cover datelined "Middletown 22 Feb. 1775" to Providence R.I., internal splits, otherwise Fine, a rare cover with these Colonial New London straightlines, ex Dr. Fay and Mayer

E. 400-500
475
Back to Top
1120
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1120, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Boston, 1775) "BOSTON". Magenta straightline handstamp struck on flap, "27/MR" Franklin mark struck alongside on folded letter datelined "Cambridge March 24th 1775" to Newport R.I., "2dwt" rate (applied by Royal Postmaster Tuthill Hubbard) and manuscript "P. Post". at bottom, contents report the death of the recipient's father, minor edge splitting, Very Fine and rare, this straightline is the scarce British Occupation postmark used by the Crown post office during the early months of "open rebellion", according to the ASCC it was used from Feb. 20, 1775, until June 5 of the same year, this example falls into that period but precedes the opening shots of the war at Lexington-Concord in April 1775, illustrated in Collectors Club Philatelist (May-June 1991)

E. 750-1,000
375
Back to Top
1121
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1121, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(New York City, 1775) "NEW-YORK". Partly clear strikes of red straightline and "Jan. 31" handstamps on flap of Jan. 30, 1775 datelined folded letter to Norwich Conn., red manuscript "2.16" rate (2dwt 16gr), "1/5" in local currency on back, small paper loss from seal removal on back, Very Fine, a scarce red New York straightline on a cover sent a few months before the beginning of the Congressional Post

E. 400-500
800
Back to Top
1122
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1122, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(New York City, 1775) "N. YORK JUN:5". Mostly clear strike of red straightline on back of 1775 docketed folded incoming packet cover to Robert Livingston in Philadelphia, manuscript "1N" prepaid packet rate, red "1/10" due in local currency (4dwt), unclear strike of red circular handstamp, some minor toning and edge splits, still Very Fine, sent during the transitional period in New York from the Parliamentary Post to the Congressional Post, this is a Parliamentary Post marking

E. 400-500
225
Back to Top
1123
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1123, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Newburyport Mass. to Philadelphia via Cambridge and New York City, 1775) "N* YORK*AU 24". Bold strike of greenish-blue straightline handstamp with large numeral date on obverse of folded letter datelined "Newburyport August 11, 1775" and addressed to Reynolds & Coates in Philadelphia, entered mails in Cambridge Mass. with "Camb 1/8" postmark (1dwt 8gr, see below for rate interpretation), transited New York City where straightline applied, letter notes that a ship the American Army depended upon for flour was taken prize by British cruisers off Cape Cod and conveyed to Boston to supply British General Gage, minor soiling and small erosion spot in "24" of straightline

VERY FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE EXAMPLE OF THE GREENISH-BLUE NEW YORK CONGRESSIONAL POST STRAIGHTLINE STRUCK ON THE FRONT OF A COVER FROM NEWBURYPORT TO PHILADELPHIA.

The Congressional Post was formed by the resolution of July 26, 1775, appointing Benjamin Franklin as the first Postmaster General of the United States. The distinctive greenish-blue ink was used by the New York post office in 1775 and 1776 after introduction of markings for the newly-created Congressional Post. Examples are rare and are normally found struck on the back of folded letters. This example, struck on the obverse and with the additional Cambridge postmark is an iconic piece of Revolutionary War postal history.

The "1/8" rate most likely represents the local currency due in Philadelphia. Working backwards with the 1.67 inflation factor (without a 2p carrier fee), this equals 20p inflation currency, 12p or 1/- shilling sterling and 4dwt (pennyweight). 4dwt represents the old Parliamentary Post single rate. Dr. Kingsley surmised that this indicates Massachusetts had by this time abandoned the provincial rating system of the new Congressional Post (and the brief 20% discount) and returned to the Parliamentary Post rate.

Illustrated in color in "United States Classic Covers" special 1986 Ameripex Chronicle issue. Also illustrated in Collectors Club Philatelist (May-June 1991, p. 169)

E. 3,000-4,000
13,000
Back to Top
1124
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1124, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(New York City, 1776) "N* YORK*JUNE 13". Absolutely perfect strike of greenish-blue straightline handstamp with large numeral date on back of folded letter from Joseph Trumbull to Capt. Jeremiah Wadsworth in Hartford Conn., red manuscript "2-16" rate (2dwt 16gr)

EXTREMELY FINE COVER AND STRIKE OF THE RARE GREENISH-BLUE NEW YORK CONGRESSIONAL POST STRAIGHTLINE. ABSOLUTE PERFECTION.

The Congressional Post was formed by the resolution of July 26, 1775, appointing Benjamin Franklin as the first Postmaster General of the United States. The distinctive greenish-blue ink was used by the New York post office in 1775 and 1776 after introduction of markings for the newly-created Congressional Post.

Joseph Trumbull was the son of Governor Jonathan Trumbull and was the first Commissary General of the Continental Army. Wadsworth was a sea captain who supplied the Continental Army. He represented Connecticut in the Continental Congress and later in the U.S. Congress

E. 2,000-3,000
8,000
Back to Top
1125
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1125, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(New York City, 1776) "N* YORK*JAN 29". Bold strike of greenish-blue straightline handstamp with large numeral date on back of small folded cover to Lancaster Pa., docketed Jan. 26, 1776, faint red manuscript "4 dwt" rate, minor age spotting, Very Fine and rare strike of this New York City straightline, the distinctive greenish-blue ink was used by the New York post office in 1775 and 1776 after introduction of markings for the newly-created Congressional Post, ex Dunsmoor

E. 1,000-1,500
850
Back to Top
1126
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1126, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Newburyport Mass. to Philadelphia via New York City, 1776) "NP -- 9.8". Manuscript postmark (9dwt 8gr) on folded letter addressed to Philadelphia, transited New York City with light manuscript "N York ford" and greenish-blue "N*YORK*MA:1" (Mar. 1, 1776) straightline struck on back, red manuscript "4/1" due in local currency (9dwt 8gr=28p x 1.67 inflation factor = 47p plus 2p carrier fee, or 4sh1p), letter content related to shipments of goods

VERY FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE REVOLUTIONARY WAR COVER COMBINING THREE SCARCE MARKINGS, INCLUDING NEWBURYPORT AND NEW YORK FORWARDED MANUSCRIPTS AND THE NEW YORK GREENISH-BLUE CONGRESSIONAL POST STRAIGHTLINE.

Calvet M. Hahn recorded only two examples of this New York forwarding manuscript

E. 1,500-2,000
3,000
Back to Top
1127
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1127, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(New York City, 1776) "N* York, Aug:19". Perfect strike of greenish-blue straightline handstamp in upper and lower case letters on flap of folded cover from Joseph Trumbull (son of Governor Jonathan Trumbull and first Commissary General of the Continental Army) to Col. Jacob Huntington in Norwich Conn., red manuscript "2-16" rate (2dwt 16gr), very fresh

EXTREMELY FINE COVER AND STRIKE. A LATE USE OF THIS SCARCE GREENISH-BLUE NEW YORK CONGRESSIONAL POST STRAIGHTLINE. THE BRITISH OCCUPATION OF NEW YORK BEGAN SHORTLY AFTER THIS WAS MAILED.

The Congressional Post was formed by the resolution of July 26, 1775, appointing Benjamin Franklin as the first Postmaster General of the United States. The distinctive greenish-blue ink was used by the New York post office in 1775 and 1776 after introduction of markings for the newly-created Congressional Post. This example, with upper and lower case letters, followed the style with upper case letters and large numerals.

This is a late use of the Congressional Post marking. The cover was mailed on August 19, 1776, shortly before the City was occupied by the British army. The Battle of Long Island, when Washington and the Army were forced to retreat across the East River, was fought on August 27. Calvet M. Hahn recorded this as the latest known use

E. 2,000-3,000
9,500
Back to Top
1128
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1128, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Wilmington N.C. to Philadelphia, 1776) "Wilmington 5 Septr". Manuscript postmark on side flap of folded letter datelined Aug. 29, 1776, manuscript "13.8" (dwt) rate and "5/10" due in local currency (13dwt 8gr=40p x 1.67 inflation factor=67p plus 2p carrier fee or 5sh10p with extra 1p), letter reports Joseph Wood escaped from a man-of-war and appeared distressed for money and a horse so writer let him have 11 pounds and a 20 pound horse, some wear and slight erosion in address panel, Fine and rare, described as the earliest reported Wilmington N.C. postmark (CMH), illustrated in Collectors Club Philatelist (May-June 1991, p. 192)

E. 1,000-1,500
1,100
Back to Top
1129
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1129, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(British Occupation of Long Island, 1777) "Jamaica 7br 22, 1777". Dateline on small folded letter from Jacob Ogden to Evert Bancker in New York City, wine-related content with instructions to "fill the cagg, which the Stageman will deliver to you, with some of your best Madeira wine", minor splits and some wear, still Fine, a scarce private express letter carried during the Revolutionary War from Long Island to New York City

E. 400-500
600
Back to Top
1130
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1130, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Fishkill N.Y., 1779) New York City U.S. Post Office in Exile. Manuscript "Free Sam. Loudon" free frank on Dec. 2, 1779 folded letter to "Joseph Bullock, Manager of the Continental Lottery" at Philadelphia, slight toning, Fine, a number of U.S. Army operations and New York governmental offices were located at (or relocated to) the strategic town of Fishkill during the Revolution, the New York City Post Office was moved to Dobbs Ferry and then to Fishkill in 1777 during the British occupation, Samuel Loudon operated a press at Fishkill and produced the first 1,000 copies of the the New York Constitution

E. 400-500
650
Back to Top
1131
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1131, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Fishkill N.Y., 1780) New York City U.S. Post Office in Exile. Manuscript "Free S. Loudon" free frank on Feb. 3, 1780 folded letter to "Joseph Bullock, United States Lottery Office" at Philadelphia, some slight splitting along file folds, Fine, a number of U.S. Army operations and New York governmental offices were located at (or relocated to) the strategic town of Fishkill during the Revolution, the New York City Post Office was moved to Dobbs Ferry and then to Fishkill in 1777 during the British occupation, Samuel Loudon operated a press at Fishkill and produced the first 1,000 copies of the the New York Constitution, described as the latest recorded example from the relocated Post Office at Fishkill (CMH), but clearly it is not since Mr. Hahn owned the later example in lot 1133

E. 400-500
500
Back to Top
1132
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1132, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(British Occupation of New York City, 1781). Folded drop letter letter datelined Apr. 15, 1781 and addressed to Captain Gideon White, City Volunteers, Broad Street, endorsed "On His Majesty's Service" and "Town Majors", contents relay a request from Lord Montegue for his man who has stolen gunpowder to be released, Very Fine, illustrated in Collectors Club Philatelist (May-June, 1991, p. 192)

E. 500-750
325
Back to Top
1133
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1133, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Fishkill N.Y.,1781) New York City U.S. Post Office in Exile. Folded letter datelined "Fishkill October 30th 1781, addressed to Philadelphia, manuscript "Way 2" crossed out with "On Public Service 2", Very Fine and a very late use, a number of U.S. Army operations and New York governmental offices were located at (or relocated to) the strategic town of Fishkill during the Revolution, the New York City Post Office was moved to Dobbs Ferry and then to Fishkill in 1777 during the British occupation

E. 500-750
1,300
Back to Top
1134
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1134, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Fishkill N.Y., 1783) Fishkill to New Utrecht (Brooklyn) N.Y. Folded letter datelined "Fishkill 15th May 1783" from Hendrick Wyckoff to Nicholas Covenhaven in New Utrecht (Brooklyn), privately carried from Fishkill, where New York City post office was located during Revolutionary War, to British-occupied Brooklyn (troops did not evacuate until Nov. 25, 1783), folds and some wear, otherwise Fine, classified by Hahn as a Through the Lines Occupation Letter

E. 400-500
1,100
Back to Top
1135
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1135, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Hackensack N.J., 1776). Folded letter written in Dutch, datelined "Hackinsack hoge School June 18, 1776" (literally "high school" but more likely referring to a school of higher learning), from Johannis Duryee to his brother Abraham Duryee "at the Narrows" (near the tidal strait separating the modern day boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn), heavily religious letter includes "during these miserable times heaven and earth make one beg for atonement and conversion because sin is accounted for in heaven and calls for revenge. Let us be judged for all time while begging before his throne...", overall age toning, still Very Fine and interesting letter between Hackensack and New York, sent weeks before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Abraham Duryee was from a prominent Dutch Huguenot family, was a member of the first Colonial Council, the Sons of Liberty and one of the famous Committee of One Hundred, accompanied by biographical information and letter translation

E. 750-1,000
375
Back to Top
1136
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1136, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Queenstown Md., 1777). Folded letter datelined "Queens Town 7th April 1777", posted at Baltimore with manuscript "2.16" rate (2dwt 16gr), addressed to John Mitchell, merchant at Philadelphia with "p post" endorsement at bottom, contents relate to Chesapeake Bay shipping concerns, minor edge flaws, Fine

E. 300-400
160
Back to Top
1137
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1137, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Edenton N.C., 1777). Folded letter datelined "Edenton 6th September 1777" to Managers of the United States Lottery at Philadelphia, manuscript "5.16" (5dwt 16gr) rate, significant splitting along interior folds, otherwise Fine and rare use, the lottery was one of the mechanisms used to help pay for the Revolutionary War, examples of mail related to its operation are elusive and desirable

E. 500-750
425
Back to Top
1138
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1138, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Alexandria Va., 1778) "5 Way". Manuscript way marking and 5dwt rate (3.8dwt plus 50% per the resolution of Oct. 17, 1777, way charge extra) at top of folded letter datelined "Alexandria July 23, 1778" to Philadelphia, minor age toning, Very Fine, a rare Revolutionary War "Way" cover from Alexandria

E. 750-1,000
2,500
Back to Top
1139
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1139, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Baltimore Md., 1778) "Balt Way 4". Manuscript way marking and rate (4dwt) on folded letter datelined "Baltimore Aug. 15, 1778," addressed to Philadelphia, age spotting, Fine

E. 300-400
350
Back to Top
1140
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1140, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Portsmouth N.H., 1779). Small folded letter datelined "Portsmouth 24th April, 1779" to merchants in Boston, "3" dwt rate at top right, minor age spotting, Fine, the manuscript at top right is "Messrs" (part of the address)

E. 200-300
130
Back to Top
1141
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1141, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Aylett Va., 1779) "Ayletts 30", Manuscript postmark on May 30, 1779 docketed folded cover to Philadelphia, slight dampstaining, otherwise Fine, extremely rare Revolutionary War cover from Aylett Va., Col. William Aylett, who inherited the family plantation that gave the town its name, died at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781

E. 500-750
475
Back to Top
1142
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1142, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Baltimore Md., 1779) "Way 16". Manuscript markings on folded letter datelined "Baltimore July 31, 1779", addressed to Leonard Dorsey in Philadelphia, manuscript "8" (dwt) crossed out above "16" (2.16dwt single rate x 3=8dwt, doubled=16dwt, way charge not incorporated into rate), Very Fine two times triple-rate way letter

E. 500-750
800
Back to Top
1143
c
Sale 1146, Lot 1143, Colonial Postal History: Revolutionary War, Transitional & Congressional Post(Chester to Albany N.Y. via River Packet, 1779). "Chester Aug. 19, 1779" dateline and "On Public Service" on folded letter to Philip Van Rensselaer "Public Store Keeper" at Albany N.Y., reports sending four boxes on the Newburgh-Albany packet, Very Fine letter sent via Hudson River packet, Philip K. Van Rensselaer was keeper of the Albany arsenal during the Revolution, he was variously referred to as "storekeeper" and "commissary"

E. 400-500
425
Back to Top