Sale 1115 — A European Connoisseur's Collection of U.S. Classic Issues

Sale Date — Tuesday, 15 December, 2015

Category — 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2055
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2055, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. Ia (6). Position 93R4 (thanks to Richard Celler for plating), with large bottom sheet margin, other sides mostly large to just barely touching outer ornaments in a couple of spots, beautiful deep Plate 4 shade and proof-like impression, cancelled by clearly struck town circular datestamp leaving all of the design fully visible, exceptionally fresh and bright

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. A WONDERFUL SHEET-MARGIN EXAMPLE OF THE RARE 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE Ia IMPERFORATE FROM THE LEGENDARY 1956 CASPARY SALE, WHERE IT WAS APTLY DESCRIBED AS "BEAUTIFUL."

This stamp is accompanied by the piece from which it was removed to verify its perfect condition. In the 1956 Caspary sale, this was the second used Scott 6 offered, and it realized $400 against its then-current catalogue value of $250.

Ex Caspary

11,000
8,500
2056
og
Sale 1115, Lot 2056, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Plate 2, original gum, large margins all around, intense shade and impression, fresh

EXTREMELY FINE. A CHOICE ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLE OF THE 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE II WITH REMARKABLY LARGE MARGINS AND EXTRAORDINARY FRESHNESS.

With 2015 P.S.E. certificate (OGh, XF 90; SMQ $2,500.00)

1,050
1,600
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2057
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2057, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Position 10R2 from the upper right corner of Plate 2, huge balanced margins all around including a sizable portion of the corner sheet margins and parts of adjoining stamps to the left and below, cancelled by light face-free strike of "Paid" in small grid in circle -- not the usual Boston cancel, but with space between bars and circle -- wonderful bright shade and proof-like impression

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS EXTRAORDINARY STAMP HAS ACHIEVED THE EXALTED GRADE OF GEM 100 FROM P.S.E. AND RANKS AMONG THE MOST BEAUTIFUL ONE-CENT 1851 ISSUE STAMPS WE HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED.

The Siegel firm has sold the lion's share of 1c 1851 Issue collections over the past several years, including the Wagshal collection (which contained the entire Neinken holding) and the Raymond Vogel collection. We have sold two of the three stamps graded Gem 100 Jumbo: one from Plate 1 Early and the other from Plate 2, each of which was cut from multiples to show adjoining stamps at the sides. The stamp offered here is the only Gem 100 we have offered among the four certified by P.S.E. What makes this stamp so remarkable is that it comes from Position 10R2, the corner of the plate, and it was not "created" from a strip. The top and right margins are from the corner of the sheet, where there are no adjoining stamps. It shows small parts of the adjoining positions, 9R at left and 20R below. For many collectors, the appearance of this stamp, with its huge balanced "white" margins, face-free cancel and brilliant color, will be more aesthetically pleasing than the appearance of the 100 Jumbo stamps with surrounding positions on all sides.

With 2015 P.S.E. certificate (Gem 100; SMQ $4,200.00). The P.S.E. Population Reports lists two Gem 100J and four Gem 100 used stamps for Scott 7.

135
3,750
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2058
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2058, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Plate 2, large to enormous margins including part of adjoining stamp above, bright shade that closely resembles the typical color of a Plate 1 Early stamp, complemented by New York City carrier datestamp, Extremely Fine Gem, a beautiful 1c 1851, with 2015 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95; SMQ $850.00)

180
650
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2059
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2059, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Position 91R2, a spectacular stamp from the bottom left corner of the right pane of Plate 2, large margins including enormous bottom left interpane margins showing edge of plate at bottom, cancelled by neat light strike of circular datestamp, lovely bright shade and sharp impression, Extremely Fine Gem, ex Emerson and Newbury, the European Connoisseur acquired this in a 1964 H. R. Harmer sale for $425

135
1,600
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2060
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2060, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Plate 2, full top and bottom margins, huge at sides showing parts of adjoining stamps, wonderful deep shade and sharp impression, town datestamp cancel, Extremely Fine, ex Newbury

135
200
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2061
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2061, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Positions 90/100L1E, vertical pair from the bottom right corner of the left pane of Plate 1 Early, huge margins all around including right interpane margin with mostly complete centerline, gorgeous bright shade and impression of Plate 1 Early, nicely complemented by blue "Charleston S.C. Paid Jan. 16" circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE GEM CENTERLINE-MARGIN PAIR OF THE 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE II FROM PLATE ONE EARLY. TRULY RARE IN THIS MAGNIFICENT QUALITY.

Ex Emerson. Acquired by the European Connoisseur in a 1964 H. R. Harmer sale for $360.

290
2,300
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2062
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2062, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. II (7). Positions 91-93L1E, horizontal strip of three, left stamp triple transfer, one inverted, large to huge margins all around, proof-like early impression and brilliant bright Plate 1 Early shade complemented by blue grid cancels, perfection

EXTREMELY FINE GEM MULTIPLE OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 IMPERFORATE FROM PLATE ONE EARLY, CONTAINING POSITION 91L1E, ONE OF THE COVETED INVERTED TRANSFER POSITIONS ON PLATE ONE.

The inverted transfers on Positions 71L, 81L and 91L1E were made after the top row of the right pane of Plate 1 Early was entered from the Type I single-relief transfer roll. According to Richard Celler's theory (see Siegel Encyclopedia at http://siegelauctions.com/enc/pdf/1c1851.pdf ), the three inverted transfers were made from a Type I design 3-relief transfer roll as a sort of trial after the top row entries had been made and the plate was turned around 180 degrees. When another plate ("Plate 0") had to be discarded, the siderographer returned to Plate 1 and erased the three inverted transfers before completing the plate with entries surrounding 3R to 10R. Positions 71L and 81L are double transfers. Position 91L was entered a total of three times, so it is a triple transfer, one inverted. When the plate was reworked in 1852, 71L and 81L were re-entered (but not 91L), making them all triple transfers, one inverted.

Ex Newbury Part II (Siegel Sale 244, lot 126), where acquired by the European Connoisseur for $270 in 1961

E. 1,000-1,500
1,800
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2063
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2063, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. III (8). Position 81L4, outstanding example of the type with very large breaks in both top and bottom outer lines, large to huge margins, deep rich color and proof-like impression, very lightly cancelled by town circular datestamp leaving the entire design virtually cancel free, fresh and bright

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS ONE-CENT 1851 ISSUE STAMP IS A VERY DESIRABLE "WIDE BREAKS" POSITION FROM PLATE 4 AND, WITH ITS LARGE MARGINS AND UNUSUALLY LIGHT CANCELLATION, DESERVES THE ATTENTION OF THE MOST DISCRIMINATING COLLECTOR.

Type III is defined by breaks in the outer lines at both top and bottom. Many Type III stamps have breaks that were created or enlarged by plate wear. Since the wear occurred over a period of time, a majority of stamps of this type (both unused and used) have small breaks in at least one line. The most notable exception is Position 99R2, which has the widest breaks of any Type III position, due to the short transfer during plate entry.

The example of the 1c 1851 Type III offered here is significant for several reasons. The breaks at top and bottom are so wide that they actually approach those of Position 99R2. The large margins and light cancellation also allow for easy observation of the type characteristics. All factors considered -- design, impression, margins and cancel -- this stamp is easily one of the finest in existence. The P.S.E. grade of XF 90 does not do it justice, and if one uses Power Search to compare this stamp to the others graded 90, it will be obvious that this stamp "blows them away."

Ex Newbury. With 2015 P.S.E. certificate (XF 90; SMQ $6,000.00).

2,250
10,000
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2064
 
Sale 1115, Lot 2064, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. III (8). Plate 4, wide breaks at top and bottom, beautiful dark shade, cancelled by Boston circular datestamp with integral "Paid" fully struck on the stamp

EXTREMELY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE III STAMP WITH WIDE BREAKS IN LINES AT TOP AND BOTTOM AND A DISTINCTIVE "PAID" CANCEL.

Ex Caspary. With 2015 P.S.E. certificate (VF-XF 85; SMQ $4,250.00). Considering the large margins and exceptional eye appeal of this stamp, as well as the fact that the 1956 Caspary catalogue described it as "Extremely Fine," we feel the P.S.E. was a bit stingy with this grade

2,250
2,500
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2065
c
Sale 1115, Lot 2065, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. III (8). Plate 4, a strong Type III with huge break in bottom line and a formidable break in top line, three huge margins and full at top, intense shade and impression, tied by perfectly clear strike of "Litchfield Ct. Nov. 19, 1858" circular datestamp on lady's small cover to a local addressee

EXTREMELY FINE. A SPLENDID EXAMPLE OF THE SCARCE 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE III IMPERFORATE ON A DROP-RATE COVER. ONE OF THE GEMS OF THE COLLECTION.

Ex Newbury. The Scott value for a 1c Type III on cover is only $250 more than the value for a used stamp off cover, which by no means reflects the scarcity and desirability of the short-lived imperforate 1c Type III on cover, especially in this quality.

2,500
14,500
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2066
c
Sale 1115, Lot 2066, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 6-8)1c Blue, Ty. III (8). Position 99R2, large to huge margins showing the distinctive and unique 99R2 characteristics -- wide breaks at top and bottom and major double transfer along right side -- rich color, clear impression, paying circular rate and tied by single strike of blue "BALTO. PAID" double-circle handstamp on blue printed market report to Boston, far left section of address panel excised to display the printed dateline May 2, 1856

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS BEAUTIFUL AND RARE USE OF THE 1851 ONE-CENT TYPE III FROM POSITION 99R2 ON COVER IS SURPASSED ONLY BY THE SHEET-MARGIN EXAMPLE ON THE FAMOUS ISHIKAWA COVER. THIS COVER RANKS AMONG THE MOST OUTSTANDING ONE-CENT 1851 ISSUE ITEMS.

Plate 2 was made in late 1855, and consisted of 198 positions that are Type II, one position that is Type III (99R2) and one Type IIIA (100R2). The Type III from Plate 2 is considered by philatelists to be truly exceptional, because it shows the widest breaks in the top and bottom lines of any Type III. These breaks are the defining type characteristics, and the width of the breaks in 99R2 give it a very distinctive appearance. How these breaks came about is an interesting story in 1851-56 Issue plate manufacture. It was originally told by Ashbrook and Neinken, and more recently updated by Richard Celler and Elliot Omiya ("The Toppan Carpenter Plates and the Guide Reliefing Method," The 1851 Issue of United States Stamps: A Sesquicentennial Retrospective, U.S. Philatelic Classics Society, 2006).

Guide dots were used by siderographers to precisely align the subjects on the plate when each position was entered from the transfer roll. On Plate 2, Positions 79R and 89R were properly transferred using their guide dots. However, the guide dot to the southeast of Position 88R, which was used to align the single B Relief for Position 99R2, was grossly out of line. The misplaced dot was accidentally used, and the bed of the press was moved too far, resulting in the bottom part of the A Relief being transferred into the bottom part of Position 89 (and in the margin below this position) by mistake. The original misplaced entry of Position 99R2 was burnished out, but apparently no attempt was made to erase the parts of the A Relief transferred into the bottom of Position 89R2.

When the fresh entry was made in Position 99R, a full transfer of the design was not possible without running into Position 89R. The position was therefore short transferred at top. The bottom, which also appears incomplete, was either short transferred or possibly burnished out. The effect of these problems entering 99R2 was a design with the top and bottom severely cropped, thus producing the finest example of Type III found on any plate.

For his entire collecting life, the late Raymond Vogel searched for this 99R2 cover, based on a picture of it in one of the Robert S. Emerson auctions. It had last appeared in a 1960's H. R. Harmer sale, but Ray was never able to determine its whereabouts. With the emergence of the European Connoisseur's collection, we now have the answer. Ray always regarded it as one of the two finest 99R2 covers, comparable to the huge sheet-margin example on cover, ex Ishikawa, which is now one of the highlights of the Gordon Eubanks exhibit collection of 1851-56 Issues.

Ex Emerson and Jessup. With 2015 P.F. certificate.

16,000
13,000
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