Sale 1022 — The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals

Sale Date — Wednesday, 28 March, 2012

Category — New Orleans, Louisiana

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
1073
og
Sale 1022, Lot 1073, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Blue (62X1). Vertical pair, Positions 27/35, large margins with traces of adjoining stamps at left and part three-line imprint at bottom, just clear at top right, original gum, tiny h.r., horizontal creases thru top stamp, between stamps and in margin where it ends in small paper breaks, otherwise Very Fine, one of two recorded examples of the 2c Blue with bottom imprint, ex Caspary and Dr. Skinner, with 2001 P.F. certificate

E. 750-1,000
3,500
1074
ngbl
Sale 1022, Lot 1074, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Blue (62X1). Block of four, Positions 7-8/15-16, unused (no gum), full to large margins all around with traces of adjoining stamp at bottom and sheet margin at top right, few horizontal creases mostly between stamps not mentioned on accompanying certificate, small faint toned spots and natural inclusions

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE LARGEST RECORDED MULTIPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT BLUE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL.

Our records contain just one other block, which is very defective. This block is illustrated in Dr. Skinner's 1978 Congress Book article. Ex Caspary, Dr. Graves, Weill and Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

6,500
2,000
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1075
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1075, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Blue (62X1). Large margins almost all around, just touching frameline in two places, distinctive bright shade and early impression on crisp white paper, tied by perfectly struck "New Orleans La. 29 Jul." (1861) circular datestamp on manila cover to Thomas P. Street in Liberty Miss., with original printed wholesale prices current enclosure

EXTREMELY FINE. WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE FINEST NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT BLUE COVERS WE HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED.

Approximately 30 covers are known with the 2c Blue (27 in Crown census), including circular rates and drop rates. More than half of the covers have stamps without four margins or faults in the stamp or cover. This is one of the most pristine covers we have seen.

Ex Caspary and Dr. Graves

4,250
5,000
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1076
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1076, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Blue (62X1). Huge margins almost all around, just touching frameline at lower left, bright shade and sharp impression, tied by clearly struck "New Orleans La. 2 Aug." (1861) circular datestamp on cover to Russellville Ala., unusual notation "Circular from Corn Mercht.", couple trivial stain spots

EXTREMELY FINE. AN EXCEPTIONALLY HIGH-QUALITY EXAMPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT BLUE PROVISIONAL ON A CIRCULAR-RATE COVER.

Approximately 30 covers are known with the 2c Blue (27 in Crown census), including circular rates and drop rates. More than half of the covers have stamps without four margins or faults in the stamp or cover.

Ex Grant, Meroni and Dr. Simon

4,250
2,800
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1077
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1077, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Blue, Printed on Both Sides (62X1a). Very Fine stamp, used with normal 2c Blue (62X1), huge margins showing parts of three adjoining stamps, slightly in on two sides, both tied by clear "New Orleans La. Sep. 1" (1861) circular datestamp on fresh unsealed cover to Burtonton Miss., double 2c circular rate, the error has been lifted to show both sides

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT PRINTED ON BOTH SIDES ERROR IN EXISTENCE. AN IMPORTANT PROVISIONAL RARITY AND KEY ITEM OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S ISSUE.

Our records and the Crown census contain only one example of the 2c printed-on-both-sides error, which is the stamp on this cover. The old Dietz catalogue also lists an unused single and single on cover, but there is no basis for those entries.

The Crown book (page 264) contains the following quote from Charles J. Phillips: "In May 1890, the Scott Stamp & Coin Co. sold at auction the collection of my old friend C. B. Corwin. In this sale there was: 2c blue, a pair [sic] cancelled on cover, one stamp of the pair was printed on both sides. This unique item sold for $27.00! I do not know its present location."

Ex C. B. Corwin, Everett and Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

7,500
9,000
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1078
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1078, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Blue, 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X1, 62X4). Three 2c and one 5c, each with large margins to slightly in on one side, bright colors, tied together by four strikes of "Paid" cancel, full clear strike of "New Orleans La. 1 Oct." (1861) circular datestamp on cover to Dr. Peyton Grimes in Orange Court House Va., part of backflap removed, tiny tear in first 2c at left, opening tear into datestamp has been skillfully sealed, some very minor cosmetic improvements along top edge of cover

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED COVER WITH BOTH DENOMINATIONS OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ISSUE. ONLY TWO COVERS ARE KNOWN WITH DIFFERENT SOUTHERN PROVISIONAL ADHESIVES USED TOGETHER, THIS BEING THE ONLY 2-CENT COMBINATION. A SPECTACULAR COVER AND OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

Combination frankings involving two different stamps are extremely scarce in Confederate philately. Even among the General Issues, covers showing 2c, 5c and 10c stamps used in any kind of combination are elusive, and those involving 2c stamps are exceedingly rare. We know of only two Confederate provisional combination covers: the Nashville Tenn. 5c and 10c combination, ex Caspary, Lightner, Graves and Boshwit (Siegel Sale 940, lot 357, realized $85,000), and this New Orleans 2c and 5c combination. The Nashville cover is a three-times 5c rate and has been skillfully reduced and restored. This New Orleans cover was prepaid at the 10c rate for distance over 500 miles (1c overpayment).

Ex Seybold, Needham, Grant and Dr. Skinner. With 1969 and 2001 P.F. certificates

E. 15,000-20,000
17,500
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1079
ngbl
Sale 1022, Lot 1079, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Red (62X2). Block of nine, Positions 9-11/17-19/25-27, full to huge margins with sheet margin at left, unused (no gum), rich color, right stamps with vertical crease ending in reinforced tear in top right stamp, tiny nick at top right and light creasing in center row

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE LARGEST RECORDED MULTIPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT RED PROVISIONAL.

This block was found in the 1970's and was a critical piece of evidence in Dr. Hubert Skinner's reconstruction of the 2c plate.

Illustrated in 1978 Congress Book article. Ex Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate. Scott Retail as block of four, pairs and single

2,940
2,000
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1080
og
Sale 1022, Lot 1080, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Red (62X2). All forty positions reconstructed from a total of 46 stamps, including (in descending order of size with positions in brackets): block of eight [7-8/15-16/23-24/31-32], block of six [19-20/27-28/35-36] and strip of five [13/21/29/37-38] rejoined to form the original block, strip of five [9-13], block of four* [1-2/9-10], strip of three [7/14-15], pairs [17-18, 29-30*, 39-40] and singles [3, 4, 5, 6*, 22, 25, 26, 33, 34], all have original gum except those items marked with an asterisk (*), generally of excellent color and freshness, full to large margins, corner block of four has thin spots and indelible ink on back, a few others may have small insignificant faults

A VERY FINE AND IMPORTANT PLATE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SCARCE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT RED POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, INCLUDING A BLOCK OF EIGHT, REJOINED BLOCK OF ELEVEN, CORNER BLOCK OF FOUR AND STRIP OF FIVE. THE CORRECT PLATING OF THIS STAMP WAS ONLY COMPLETED IN 1977, AND THIS RECONSTRUCTION IS ONE OF THE GREAT ACHIEVEMENTS IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

For a detailed discussion of the plating of the 2c provisional, please refer to Dr. Skinner's article in the 1978 Congress Book, pages 122-128.

Ex Dr. Skinner. Block of four accompanied by 1977 A.P.S. certificate. Total Scott value more than $10,000.00

E. 5,000-7,500
4,250
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1081
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1081, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Red (62X2). Dark Red shade on grayish paper, large margins to well clear of frameline, tied by "New Orleans La. 22 Mar." (1862) circular date-stamp on cover to Auburn Ala., few trivial toned specks on cover (not on stamp)

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE TEN RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE RARE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT RED PROVISIONAL.

New Orleans postmaster, J. L. Riddell, prepared provisional stamps in June 1861 and advertised them for sale on June 12th. The 2c Red stamps were printed without the marginal inscription "Usable exclusively in the New Orleans Post Office". The 5c and subsequent 2c Blue printings all have the imprint. It is the accepted theory that the 2c Red stamps were printed first, before Riddell added the imprint, and were withheld from use until January 1862 when the supply of 2c Blue stamps was exhausted. The Crown book lists six 2c Red covers, while Dr. Hubert C. Skinner (Congress Book, 1978) recorded eight covers. We have located ten covers.

Ex Mason and Dr. Simon. With 1964 P.F. certificate

25,000
21,000
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1082
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1082, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Red (62X2). Intense Vermilion Red shade, full to large margins all around, tied by "New Orleans La. 9 Feb." (1862) circular datestamp on folded printed prices-current list to Cummings, Edwards & Co. in Memphis Tenn.

EXTREMELY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT RED PROVISIONAL USED ON AN IMMACULATE PRINTED CIRCULAR. ONE OF THE HIGHEST-QUALITY COVERS AMONG THE TEN RECORDED.

New Orleans postmaster, J. L. Riddell, prepared provisional stamps in June 1861 and advertised them for sale on June 12th. The 2c Red stamps were printed without the marginal inscription "Usable exclusively in the New Orleans Post Office". The 5c and subsequent 2c Blue printings all have the imprint. It is the accepted theory that the 2c Red stamps were printed first, before Riddell added the imprint, and were withheld from use until January 1862 when the supply of 2c Blue stamps was exhausted. The Crown book lists six 2c Red covers, while Dr. Hubert C. Skinner (Congress Book, 1978) recorded eight covers. We have located ten covers.

Ex MacBride, Kimmel, Haas and Dr. Green. With 2000 P.F. certificate

25,000
21,000
Back to Top
1083
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1083, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 2c Red (62X2). Distinctive Bright Orange Red shade, Position 37, huge margins with trace of adjoining stamps at bottom left and bottom right, full at top, tied by "New Orleans La. 6 Jan." (1862) circular datestamp on cover to Benton Ark., manuscript "1 circular" at top left with the names of three members of the Saline County Bible Society, very slightly reduced at top and trivial small edge mends at top left

EXTREMELY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL BRIGHT SHADE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 2-CENT RED PROVISIONAL AND ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE TEN RECORDED COVERS BEARING THIS ISSUE.

New Orleans postmaster, J. L. Riddell, prepared provisional stamps in June 1861 and advertised them for sale on June 12th. The 2c Red stamps were printed without the marginal inscription "Usable exclusively in the New Orleans Post Office". The 5c and subsequent 2c Blue printings all have the imprint. It is the accepted theory that the 2c Red stamps were printed first, before Riddell added the imprint, and were withheld from use until January 1862 when the supply of 2c Blue stamps was exhausted. The Crown book lists six 2c Red covers, while Dr. Hubert C. Skinner (Congress Book, 1978) recorded eight covers. We have located ten covers. This cover comes from a correspondence acquired by Harold C. Brooks and is illustrated in Stanley B. Ashbrook's article on the Brooks collection (Stamp Specialist, 1945 Black Book).

Ex Brooks, Grant and Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

25,000
19,000
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1084
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1084, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Brown, British Papermaker's Embossed Coat of Arms (62X3 var). Full even margins, cancelled by "Paid" and part of New Orleans circular datestamp

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF A NEW ORLEANS PROVISIONAL WITH THE BRITISH PAPERMAKER'S EMBOSSED SEAL.

Ex Knapp and Brown

E. 1,500-2,000
2,600
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1085
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1085, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Brown (62X3). Irregular margins just in, faint stain, tied by one of two strikes of numeral "6" rate handstamp with matching Natchez Miss. "Steam" straightline applied on arrival, no other markings on Goodrich & Co. grocer and merchant's overall light orange lithographed advertising cover to Natchez, endorsed with name of steamboat "Mary T.", Fine and rare example of the New Orleans provisional cancelled on arrival at Natchez after a steamboat trip up river, ex Everett

E. 1,000-1,500
5,000
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1086
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1086, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Brown (62X3). Two, each with full to clear margins all around, cancelled by two strikes of "Paid" and one tied by "New Orleans La. 9 Aug." (1861) circular datestamp on Payan & Carhart clothing merchant's overall light orange lithographed advertising cover to Messrs. C. & H. W. Raguet in Nacogdoches Tex., neat receipt docketing at left, Extremely Fine

E. 1,000-1,500
6,750
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1087
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1087, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with United States 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED, AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read; in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have a Southern Postmaster's Provisional stamps (both New Orleans). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-14. Illustrated in National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial book and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas, Ishikawa and Walske. With 2010 P.F. certificate

E. 75,000-100,000
90,000
Back to Top
1088
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1088, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Ocher (62X3b). Huge margins including portion of adjoining stamp at top, beautiful rich shade, tied by clear strike of "New Orleans La. 11 Aug." (1861) circular datestamp on bright yellow cover to "Genl. G. W. Munday, Clinton La.", tiny trivial cover edge tear at top

EXTREMELY FINE GEM EXAMPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT PROVISIONAL IN THE SCARCE OCHER SHADE ON AN ATTRACTIVE COVER.

G. W. Munday was commissioned major-general of the militia before the war.

Ex Grant, Meroni, Freeland and Dr. Graves. A pair is also known on cover on this date from the same sender (ex Worthington, Caspary and Dr. Green)

2,750
2,100
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1089
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1089, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Enormous margins all around including "New Orlean(s)" portion of imprint at bottom and part of adjoining stamp at top, neat strike of "PD 5 CTS./N.O.P.O." two-line handstamp (which was also used to make provisional envelopes), few creases and small thin spots, Extremely Fine appearance and a spectacular stamp, ex Hill

E. 500-750
550
Back to Top
1090
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1090, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Horizontal pair, large margins on three sides, just touched at bottom, rich color, tied by "New Orleans La. 20 Oct." (1861) circular datestamp on cover addressed to "Mr. Clarence Morfit, Richmond, Virginia, C.S.A." (unusual use of "C.S.A." in address), with red and blue 11-Star Confederate Flag Patriotic design and poetic verse at right "Stand firmly by your cannon/Let ball and grape-shot fly./And trust in God and Davis/But keep your powder dry", imprint along left edge "Sold by G. Ellis, Post Office News Depot, N.O.", pristine condition

EXTREMELY FINE. A SPECTACULAR CONFEDERATE 11-STAR FLAG PATRIOTIC COVER WITH A PAIR OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT PROVISIONAL PAYING THE OVER-500 MILES RATE TO RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. THE SENDER CHOSE TO USE PATRIOTIC STATIONERY AND TO IDENTIFY VIRGINIA AS PART OF THE "C.S.A."

Capt. Clarence Morfit was the Assistant Quartermaster for Confederate prisons in Richmond, Virginia.

We are aware of eight patriotic covers with the 5c New Orleans provisional stamp, including red and blue Flag and Cannon designs and the unique "Soldier" design in black.

Ex Matthies, Freeland and Dr. Graves

E. 10,000-15,000
28,000
Back to Top
1091
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1091, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Three huge margins, ample to clear at bottom, rich color, tied by "New Orleans La. 7 Sep." (1861) circular datestamp on small oblong cover with red and blue 10-Star Confederate Flag Patriotic design, to Donaldsonville La., slightly reduced at top, piece of backflap missing, vertical crease clear of stamp

VERY FINE. A COLORFUL AND EXTREMELY RARE USE OF THE NEW ORLEANS PROVISIONAL ON A CONFEDERATE 10-STAR FLAG PATRIOTIC.

We are aware of eight patriotic covers with the 5c New Orleans provisional stamp, including red and blue Flag and Cannon designs and the unique "Soldier" design in black. The 10-Star Flag on this cover has a distinctive pattern of stars; another example used from Evergreen La. is shown in the Wishnietsky book on Confederate patriotics (page 56). The design was later modified by adding an eleventh star to the center. Two different imprints are recorded: 10-Star with "J. K. Sutterley, Bookseller, under the St. Charles Hotel, N.O." (Grant collection, John A. Fox sale, Mar. 11, 1959, lot 137) and 11-star with "R. Coburn, Bookseller, N.O." (Wishnietsky, page 69).

Ex Emerson and Hall. With 2000 P.F. certificate

E. 7,500-10,000
15,500
Back to Top
1092
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1092, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Three large to huge margins, barely in at top, tied by "New Orleans La. 21 Nov." (1861) circular datestamp on cover to Vicksburg Miss. with L. W. Lyons & Co. clothing and furnishing goods illustrated advertising corner card, marvelously detailed depiction of building with people, horses and wagons on street, lengthy description of goods sold including "Paris, London & New York Fashions", sender's notation "Via Rail Road", possibly reflecting wartime disruption of steamboat route up the Mississippi River

EXTREMELY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT AND RARE ADVERTISING COVER WITH THE NEW ORLEANS PROVISIONAL. ONLY ONE OTHER SIMILAR COVER IS RECORDED.

We sold another cover from the same correspondence with an identical corner card in our sale of the Kilbourne collection.

Ex Dr. Graves

E. 5,000-7,500
15,000
Back to Top
1093
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1093, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Horizontal pair, huge margins to clear at top of left stamp, tied by "New Orleans La. 13 Nov." (1861) circular datestamp on cover to Capt. Victor Maurin, Donaldson Artillery, at Richmond Va., with A. J. Powell "Plantation Broker" illustrated overall lithographed advertising design in gray, sender's route directive "Via Augusta", reduced at left, otherwise Very Fine, advertising covers with reference to plantations or cotton are quite desirable

E. 750-1,000
2,400
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1094
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1094, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Horizontal strips of six and four, Positions 11-16, 19-22, margins vary from huge to slightly in, uncancelled, paying five-times 10c rate on legal-size orange cover originally containing depositions to District Court in Clarksville Tex., reverse with manuscript "Rec'd this package from the hand of Wm. Shannon, Notary public, New Orleans August 27th 1861" and signed by Postmaster J. L. Riddell with "New Orleans La. Aug. 27, 1861" double-circle datestamp (probably applied by Riddell himself), cover has large green seal tied by Shannon's signature and manuscript "Notary", minor corner flaws from mounting noted for accuracy only and are not mentioned on accompanying certificate

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE LARGEST RECORDED MULTIPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL USED ON COVER.

We are aware of covers bearing a vertical strip of five, a horizontal strip of five (end stamp deeply cut into) and two blocks of four. A block of six and vertical strip of five also exist off cover.

Ex Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

E. 3,000-4,000
3,250
Back to Top
1095
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1095, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Oct. 4, 1861 folded letter -- part-printed legal notice -- originally franked with four 5c provisional stamps (one cut out from upper right and replaced with another stamp) -- used in combination with pair of United States 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), all original stamps tied together by three strikes of "Paid" cancel, "New Orleans La. 6 Oct." (1861) circular datestamp also ties two 5c stamps, manuscript "Due 6 cts." for U.S. postage -- demonetized 3c 1857 pair not recognized -- with significant note written on inside panel, which reads: "Notices of Protest similar to the within to [list of names] by me received this 12 April 1862 and placed in the Post Office at Georgetown Ky. Postage paid & in time for next mail. Noah Spears NPLC.", files folds, minor stamp faults

A REMARKABLE ACROSS-THE-LINES USE FROM NEW ORLEANS TO GEORGETOWN, KENTUCKY, CARRIED WELL AFTER MAIL EXCHANGE BETWEEN THE NORTH AND SOUTH WAS TERMINATED.

With the suspension of government mail exchange between Louisville and Nashville in June 1861, the express companies assumed the primary role in carrying letters across the lines. Such service was outlawed with the Federal ban on all commerce and exchange on August 26. This letter and other similar notices -- as described in the contemporary endorsement -- were sent from New Orleans to Georgetown, Kentucky, on October 4, 1861, weeks after express companies were banned from carrying such mail. The sender apparently expected that the double Confederate postage and double United States postage would assure its delivery. However, not only were the U.S. stamps invalid, the express companies were no longer carrying mail across the lines.

It is unclear how the letter reached Noah Spears (1793-1868), nor do we know his function. Some genealogical information about Spears can be found on the internet:

"...in 1853, he again established himself in business, opening a store in Georgetown, for the sale of dry goods, boots and shoes, etc., which he carried on successfully for some time. In 1860 he was appointed clerk in the Framer's Bank, at Georgetown, and in 1868, he was elected cashier; which position he still fills. During the war he felt that it was his duty to support the Union, but, nevertheless, his sympathies were strongly Southern. Being unable to resist the natural current of events, however, he took no active part in the struggle, but was afterward arrested, owing to an overstrained interpretation of a Federal order, and lodged in prison; but after a short time, was released upon the interference and solicitations of friends, who were both numerous and warm."

Ex Brown, Knapp, Brooks, Haas and Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

E. 4,000-5,000
5,750
Back to Top
1096
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1096, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Huge margins at sides, clear to full at top and bottom, rich color on deep blue paper, tied by clear strike of "PD 5 CTS/N.O.P.O." two-line provisional handstamp with "J. L. RIDDELL, P.M." straightline and "New Orleans La. Aug. 26, 1861" river-mail double-circle datestamp on buff cover to Mrs. A. J. McGill, care of Messrs. Griffin & Lewis in Rodney Miss., sender's manuscript name-of-boat directive "Vicksburg" at lower left, backflap tears including one extending just into front at top, far from stamp

VERY FINE. A RARE USE OF THE PROVISIONAL HANDSTAMP TO CANCEL THE 5-CENT NEW ORLEANS PROVISIONAL ADHESIVE. ONLY 12 TO 15 EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN.

Rodney was a city in southwest Mississippi approximately 32 miles from Natchez. An important city in the 19th century, its population dwindled to nearly zero after the Mississippi River changed course.

Ex Knapp, Grant and Dr. Graves

E. 2,000-3,000
2,700
Back to Top
1097
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1097, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish (62X4). Evenly cut close to or barely into design on three sides, tied by "Shieldsborough Miss. Oct. 10" (1861) circular datestamp, second strike at left on cover to Jackson Miss., docketing indicates Oct. 8 origin date

VERY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE NEW ORLEANS PROVISIONAL POSTMARKED AT SHIELDSBOROUGH, MISSISSIPPI.

Shieldsborough was later renamed Bay St. Louis and lies in the harbor east of New Orleans. This cover was probably carried by a vessel out of New Orleans and mailed at Shieldsborough for the trip north to Jackson, Mississippi. Although covers are known with New Orleans provisionals postmarked at offices along the Mississippi River, this use from Shieldsborough, a harbor office, is quite remarkable and, to our knowledge, unique.

Ex Worthington, Emerson, Grant and Dr. Graves

E. 4,000-5,000
9,500
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1098
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1098, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish, Printed on Both Sides (62X4a). Full margins, reverse with full split impression, also a mirror offset, New Orleans circular datestamp

VERY FINE EXAMPLE OF THE RARE PRINTED-ON-BOTH-SIDES VARIETY. PROBABLY FEWER THAN A DOZEN EXAMPLES EXIST ON EITHER WHITE OR BLUISH PAPER.

Ex Knapp, Brown and Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

2,750
3,250
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1099
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1099, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red Brown on Bluish, Printed on Both Sides (62X4a). Full margins, reverse with split impression, cancelled by "PD 5 CTS/N.O.P.O." two-line handstamp applied at wharf office, cancelled side with minor scuff at top

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE ONLY KNOWN EXAMPLE OF THE RARE PRINTED-ON-BOTH-SIDES VARIETY CANCELLED WITH THE PROVISIONAL HANDSTAMP APPLIED AT THE WHARFSIDE POST OFFICE.

Probably fewer than a dozen examples of the printed on both sides variety exist on either White or Bluish paper. In addition, only 12-15 examples of the 5c adhesive are known cancelled with the provisional handstamp. The combination of the two makes this an important Confederate States and New Orleans rarity.

Ex Dr. Graves

2,750
2,700
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1100
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1100, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Bright Orange Red on White (62X6). Full to large margins, pure Bright Orange Red shade, bold "DUE" straightline applied by the United States post office on mail received from the seceded states, which was treated as unpaid, and faint New Orleans "JUN" (1861) circular datestamp, thins reinforced with paper

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. ONLY SEVEN EXAMPLES OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT RED ARE RECORDED, INCLUDING FOUR ON WHITE PAPER FROM THE FIRST PRINTING. HOWEVER, ONE OF THE FOUR IS A HYBRID BROWN-AND-RED SHADE, AND TWO HAVE NOT BEEN SEEN IN MORE THAN 70 YEARS, MAKING THIS THE ONLY EXAMPLE OF PURE RED ON WHITE THAT CAN BE ACQUIRED AT THIS TIME. IT IS ALSO THE ONLY COLOR ERROR CANCELLED BY THE NORTHERN "DUE (3cts)" MARKING APPLIED TO MAIL AFTER SUSPENSION OF REGULAR MAIL SERVICE IN JUNE 1861. AN OUTSTANDING CONFEDERATE RARITY.

There is only one true color error among all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals: the New Orleans 5c Red, which is found on both White and Bluish papers.

In his 1978 Congress Book article, Dr. Hubert C. Skinner theorized that either "too much red ink was introduced onto the platen in blending the brown ink or the components of the ink separated while the press was idle for a time." This, he speculated, "produced a mottled impression on a very few sheets" and "would have been corrected as soon as the rollers passed across the platen a few times re-mixing or blending the ink." The discovery of the hybrid Red-and-Brown stamp (lot 1101) confirmed Dr. Skinner's theory. The ink mixture error had to have occurred more than once, because the stamps on White paper were printed in June, and the stamps on Blue paper were printed in August.

The five stamps presented in lots 1100 to 1104 constitute the largest number of the New Orleans 5c Red Color Error ever assembled by one collector. Each shade of Red is different, and together they provide an opportunity to see how five of the seven known copies compare to one another. Only two examples eluded D.K.: No. 1 listed below, the unused 5c Red on White, ex Ferrary, Hind and Brooks, which has not been seen since the 1943 Laurence & Stryker sale of the Brooks collection; and No. 3, a cut-in 5c Red on piece, which has not been seen publicly since it was photographed by Hiram Deats.

Our records contain the following examples of the 5c Red error: White Paper (62X6): 1) Unused with traces of gum, ex Ferrary, Hind, Brooks (not seen publicly since 1943); 2) "DUE (3cts)" straightline, partly rebacked over thins, ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne, the stamp offered here; 3) Cut in at bottom, tied by "Paid" straightline on part of cover to Mrs. Wm. Reynaud, Baton Rouge, photo by Hiram Deats in P.F. files; 4) Mixture of Red and Brown, corner strike of circular datestamp, partly rebacked over thins and tear, discovered recently, D.K. lot 1101; Blue Paper (62X7): 5) Dec. 4 circular datestamp, thin spots and small repair, ex Crocker and Felton, D.K. lot 1104; 6) Sep. 17 circular datestamp, small faults, ex Ferrary, Hind and Lilly, D.K. lot 1103; 7) Position 1, "Paid" and part datestamp, thinned with small nicks at left, ex Caspary and Skinner, D.K. lot 1102.

Ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne

7,500
12,000
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1101
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1101, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Red-and-Brown on White (62X6). Large margins, mixture of Red and Brown inks, bold strike of New Orleans circular datestamp, torn in half and thinned (repaired)

VERY FINE AND ATTRACTIVE APPEARANCE DESPITE REPAIRS. THIS IS THE DISCOVERY COPY OF THE HYBRID RED AND BROWN ERROR, WHICH PROVES THAT THE 5-CENT RED COLOR ERRORS RESULTED FROM COMPLICATIONS IN MIXING INKS.

There is only one true color error among all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals: the New Orleans 5c Red, which is found on both White and Bluish papers.

In his 1978 Congress Book article, Dr. Hubert C. Skinner theorized that either "too much red ink was introduced onto the platen in blending the brown ink or the components of the ink separated while the press was idle for a time." This, he speculated, "produced a mottled impression on a very few sheets" and "would have been corrected as soon as the rollers passed across the platen a few times re-mixing or blending the ink." The discovery of the hybrid Red-and-Brown stamp (the stamp offered here) confirmed Dr. Skinner's theory. The ink mixture error had to have occurred more than once, because the stamps on White paper were printed in June, and the stamps on Blue paper were printed in August.

The five stamps presented in lots 1100 to 1104 constitute the largest number of the New Orleans 5c Red Color Error ever assembled by one collector. Each shade of Red is different, and together they provide an opportunity to see how five of the seven known copies compare to one another. Only two examples eluded D.K.: No. 1 listed below, the unused 5c Red on White, ex Ferrary, Hind and Brooks, which has not been seen since the 1943 Laurence & Stryker sale of the Brooks collection; and No. 3, a cut-in 5c Red on piece, which has not been seen publicly since it was photographed by Hiram Deats.

Our records contain the following examples of the 5c Red error: White Paper (62X6): 1) Unused with traces of gum, ex Ferrary, Hind, Brooks (not seen publicly since 1943); 2) "DUE (3cts)" straightline, partly rebacked over thins, ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne, D.K. lot 1100; 3) Cut in at bottom, tied by "Paid" straightline on part of cover to Mrs. Wm. Reynaud, Baton Rouge, photo by Hiram Deats in P.F. files; 4) Mixture of Red and Brown, corner strike of circular datestamp, partly rebacked over thins and tear, discovered recently, the stamp offered here; Blue Paper (62X7): 5) Dec. 4 circular datestamp, thin spots and small repair, ex Crocker and Felton, D.K. lot 1104; 6) Sep. 17 circular datestamp, small faults, ex Ferrary, Hind and Lilly, D.K. lot 1103; 7) Position 1, "Paid" and part datestamp, thinned with small nicks at left, ex Caspary and Skinner, D.K. lot 1102.

Scott value as the normal 62X6

7,500
2,400
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1102
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1102, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Deep Vermilion on Bluish (62X7). Position 1, full to large margins, extraordinarily intense shade on deeply blued paper, part of New Orleans circular datestamp and full clear strike of "Paid" cancel, thinning at left resulting in two tiny nicks (reinforced with paper)

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONLY THREE OF THE SEVEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT RED ERROR ARE PRINTED ON BLUISH PAPER. THIS IS THE MOST INTENSE SHADE OF RED WE HAVE ENCOUNTERED. ONE OF THE RAREST SOUTHERN POSTMASTERS' PROVISIONALS AND THE ONLY COLOR ERROR IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

There is only one true color error among all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals: the New Orleans 5c Red, which is found on both White and Bluish papers.

In his 1978 Congress Book article, Dr. Hubert C. Skinner theorized that either "too much red ink was introduced onto the platen in blending the brown ink or the components of the ink separated while the press was idle for a time." This, he speculated, "produced a mottled impression on a very few sheets" and "would have been corrected as soon as the rollers passed across the platen a few times re-mixing or blending the ink." The discovery of the hybrid Red-and-Brown stamp (lot 1101) confirmed Dr. Skinner's theory. The ink mixture error had to have occurred more than once, because the stamps on White paper were printed in June, and the stamps on Blue paper were printed in August.

The five stamps presented in lots 1100 to 1104 constitute the largest number of the New Orleans 5c Red Color Error ever assembled by one collector. Each shade of Red is different, and together they provide an opportunity to see how five of the seven known copies compare to one another. Only two examples eluded D.K.: No. 1 listed below, the unused 5c Red on White, ex Ferrary, Hind and Brooks, which has not been seen since the 1943 Laurence & Stryker sale of the Brooks collection; and No. 3, a cut-in 5c Red on piece, which has not been seen publicly since it was photographed by Hiram Deats.

Our records contain the following examples of the 5c Red error: White Paper (62X6): 1) Unused with traces of gum, ex Ferrary, Hind, Brooks (not seen publicly since 1943); 2) "DUE (3cts)" straightline, partly rebacked over thins, ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne, D.K. lot 1100; 3) Cut in at bottom, tied by "Paid" straightline on part of cover to Mrs. Wm. Reynaud, Baton Rouge, photo by Hiram Deats in P.F. files; 4) Mixture of Red and Brown, corner strike of circular datestamp, partly rebacked over thins and tear, discovered recently, D.K. lot 1101; Blue Paper (62X7): 5) Dec. 4 circular datestamp, thin spots and small repair, ex Crocker and Felton, D.K. lot 1104; 6) Sep. 17 circular datestamp, small faults, ex Ferrary, Hind and Lilly, D.K. lot 1103; 7) Position 1, "Paid" and part datestamp, thinned with small nicks at left, ex Caspary and Skinner, the stamp offered here.

Ex Caspary and Dr. Skinner

15,000
15,000
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1103
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1103, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Bright Red on Bluish (62X7). Full to large margins, bright shade with traces of Brown ink on deeply blued paper, "New Orleans 17 Sep." (1861) circular datestamp, thins and sealed tear at lower right

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONLY THREE OF THE SEVEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT RED ERROR ARE PRINTED ON BLUISH PAPER. ONE OF THE RAREST SOUTHERN POSTMASTERS' PROVISIONALS AND THE ONLY COLOR ERROR IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

There is only one true color error among all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals: the New Orleans 5c Red, which is found on both White and Bluish papers.

In his 1978 Congress Book article, Dr. Hubert C. Skinner theorized that either "too much red ink was introduced onto the platen in blending the brown ink or the components of the ink separated while the press was idle for a time." This, he speculated, "produced a mottled impression on a very few sheets" and "would have been corrected as soon as the rollers passed across the platen a few times re-mixing or blending the ink." The discovery of the hybrid Red-and-Brown stamp (lot 1101) confirmed Dr. Skinner's theory. The ink mixture error had to have occurred more than once, because the stamps on White paper were printed in June, and the stamps on Blue paper were printed in August.

The five stamps presented in lots 1100 to 1104 constitute the largest number of the New Orleans 5c Red Color Error ever assembled by one collector. Each shade of Red is different, and together they provide an opportunity to see how five of the seven known copies compare to one another. Only two examples eluded D.K.: No. 1 listed below, the unused 5c Red on White, ex Ferrary, Hind and Brooks, which has not been seen since the 1943 Laurence & Stryker sale of the Brooks collection; and No. 3, a cut-in 5c Red on piece, which has not been seen publicly since it was photographed by Hiram Deats.

Our records contain the following examples of the 5c Red error: White Paper (62X6): 1) Unused with traces of gum, ex Ferrary, Hind, Brooks (not seen publicly since 1943); 2) "DUE (3cts)" straightline, partly rebacked over thins, ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne, D.K. lot 1100; 3) Cut in at bottom, tied by "Paid" straightline on part of cover to Mrs. Wm. Reynaud, Baton Rouge, photo by Hiram Deats in P.F. files; 4) Mixture of Red and Brown, corner strike of circular datestamp, partly rebacked over thins and tear, discovered recently, D.K. lot 1101; Blue Paper (62X7): 5) Dec. 4 circular datestamp, thin spots and small repair, ex Crocker and Felton, D.K. lot 1104; 6) Sep. 17 circular datestamp, small faults, ex Ferrary, Hind and Lilly, the stamp offered here; 7) Position 1, "Paid" and part datestamp, thinned with small nicks at left, ex Caspary and Skinner, D.K. lot 1102.

Ex Ferrary (with his purple trefoil backstamp), Hind, Lilly and Dr. Graves

15,000
12,500
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1104
 
Sale 1022, Lot 1104, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Deep Red on Bluish (62X7). Margins to just in, intense shade with scattered spots of Brown ink on deeply blued paper, clear "New Orleans La. 4 Dec." (1861) circular datestamp, small thin spots and "small repairing" according to certificate, but the stamp is intact

FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT RED ERROR STAMPS PRINTED ON BLUISH PAPER. THIS STAMP SHOWS TRACES OF BROWN FROM THE IMPROPERLY MIXED INK.

There is only one true color error among all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals: the New Orleans 5c Red, which is found on both White and Bluish papers.

In his 1978 Congress Book article, Dr. Hubert C. Skinner theorized that either "too much red ink was introduced onto the platen in blending the brown ink or the components of the ink separated while the press was idle for a time." This, he speculated, "produced a mottled impression on a very few sheets" and "would have been corrected as soon as the rollers passed across the platen a few times re-mixing or blending the ink." The discovery of the hybrid Red-and-Brown stamp (lot 1101) confirmed Dr. Skinner's theory. The ink mixture error had to have occurred more than once, because the stamps on White paper were printed in June, and the stamps on Blue paper were printed in August.

The five stamps presented in lots 1100 to 1104 constitute the largest number of the New Orleans 5c Red Color Error ever assembled by one collector. Each shade of Red is different, and together they provide an opportunity to see how five of the seven known copies compare to one another. Only two examples eluded D.K.: No. 1 listed below, the unused 5c Red on White, ex Ferrary, Hind and Brooks, which has not been seen since the 1943 Laurence & Stryker sale of the Brooks collection; and No. 3, a cut-in 5c Red on piece, which has not been seen publicly since it was photographed by Hiram Deats.

Our records contain the following examples of the 5c Red error: White Paper (62X6): 1) Unused with traces of gum, ex Ferrary, Hind, Brooks (not seen publicly since 1943); 2) "DUE (3cts)" straightline, partly rebacked over thins, ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne, D.K. lot 1100; 3) Cut in at bottom, tied by "Paid" straightline on part of cover to Mrs. Wm. Reynaud, Baton Rouge, photo by Hiram Deats in P.F. files; 4) Mixture of Red and Brown, corner strike of circular datestamp, partly rebacked over thins and tear, discovered recently, D.K. lot 1101; Blue Paper (62X7): 5) Dec. 4 circular datestamp, thin spots and small repair, ex Crocker and Felton, the stamp offered here; 6) Sep. 17 circular datestamp, small faults, ex Ferrary, Hind and Lilly, D.K. lot 1103; 7) Position 1, "Paid" and part datestamp, thinned with small nicks at left, ex Caspary and Skinner, D.K. lot 1102.

Ex Crocker and Felton. With 1989 P.F. certificate

15,000
13,000
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1105
ogbl
Sale 1022, Lot 1105, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Yellow Brown on Off-White (62X5). Two blocks of twelve, originally part of the same sheet and rejoined, left block large margins with "Usable exclusi" portion of imprint at top, full original gum, natural inclusions, few small gum soaks, right block ample to large margins with "vely in the New Orleans Post O(ffice)" portion of imprint at top, Mint N.H., natural inclusions

EXTREMELY FINE PAIR OF IMPRINT BLOCKS OF TWELVE OF THE NEW ORLEANS 5-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- REJOINED FROM THE SAME SHEET. A WONDERFUL SHOWPIECE.

The third printing was issued in early December 1861, and most of the unused multiples come from supplies of this printing on hand when New Orleans was captured by Federal forces in April 1862.

Right block with 2000 P.F. certificate. Scott value as blocks and pairs with no premium for the imprints or the Mint N.H. gum

4,400
2,200
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1106
c
Sale 1022, Lot 1106, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Yellow Brown on Off-White (62X5). Position 26, large to huge margins with part of adjoining stamp at right, rich color, tied by full clear strike of "PD 5 CTS/N.O.P.O." provisional handstamp with "J. L. RIDDELL, P.M." straightline and "New Orleans Dec. 7, 1861" river-mail double-circle datestamp on buff cover to Livonia La., half of backflap removed, couple vertical file folds clear of stamp and couple small tears at top center

VERY FINE. THIS IS ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS WITH THE NEW ORLEANS PROVISIONAL HANDSTAMP USED TO CANCEL THE 5-CENT THIRD PRINTING.

There are probably 12 to 15 covers with the New Orleans 5c provisional cancelled by the wharf-office markings, and most of these are dated between August and November 1861. This very late use (Dec. 7, 1861) coincides with the availability of the 5c Third Printing (earliest known use is Dec. 3). The other cover, dated Dec. 31, was offered in our Kilbourne sale (lot 129).

Ex Deats, "Stonewall" (Kuphal) and Dr. Skinner. With 2001 P.F. certificate

E. 3,000-4,000
3,750
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