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Sale 1010 — 2011 Rarities of the World

Sale Date — Saturday, 18 June, 2011

Category — Pony Express Stamps

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
149
 
Sale Number 1010, Lot Number 149, Pony Express StampsWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red, $2.00 Green, $4.00 Black (143L3-143L5), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red, $2.00 Green, $4.00 Black (143L3-143L5)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red, $2.00 Green, $4.00 Black (143L3-143L5). Complete genuinely used set of the July 1861 Horse & Rider Issue for the Pony Express authorized by Congress, bright colors, ample to full margins, just touched at the bottom of the $1.00 and in couple places on the $4.00, each cancelled by blue San Francisco "Running Pony" oval handstamp, $2.00 with small corner creases, accompanied by blue San Francisco "Running Pony" handstamp on proof paper (without date)

A BEAUTIFUL AND EXCEPTIONALLY RARE COMPLETE USED SET OF THE JULY 1861 PONY EXPRESS STAMPS, INCLUDING ONE OF FEWER THAN SIX KNOWN OFF-COVER USED EXAMPLES OF THE $4.00 BLACK ISSUE.

Commencing July 1, 1861, the Pony Express was authorized by Congress to carry mail at the rate of $1.00 per half ounce. An additional fee was charged by Wells, Fargo & Co. to carry mail from San Francisco to the western terminus at Placerville. The contract also stipulated the mandatory U.S. postage charge of 10c per half ounce. Although the Scott Catalogue lists the July 1861 issue Pony Express stamps (143L3-143L6) with other private post issues, we wish to emphasize that these stamps were issued under the terms of a government mail contract; therefore, they have semi-official status.

$2.00 and $4.00 with 2001 and 2003 P.F. certificates respectively.

8,500
16,500
150
og
Sale Number 1010, Lot Number 150, Pony Express StampsWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00-$4.00 Horse & Rider Issues (143L1-143L5), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00-$4.00 Horse & Rider Issues (143L1-143L5)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00-$4.00 Horse & Rider Issues (143L1-143L5). All five Horse & Rider stamps including $2.00 Red and $4.00 Green, First Issue (April 1861) and $1.00 Red, $2.00 Green and $4.00 Black, Second Issue (July 1, 1861), each stamp plated, original gum (h.r.), large margins on fresh paper, also incl. perfect proof strike of the San Francisco Running Pony Handstamp (without date), on 99 x 73mm wove, few creases

EXTREMELY FINE SET OF WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY'S HORSE & RIDER STAMPS ISSUED FOR USE ON THE LEGENDARY PONY EXPRESS. VERY FEW SETS OF THIS HIGH QUALITY COULD BE ASSEMBLED.

The Pony Express was launched in 1860 by the overland freight express firm operated by William H. Russell, Alexander Majors and William B. Waddell. In an attempt to secure the lucrative government mail contract, the Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company announced that it would carry letters between California and the railroad terminus at St. Joseph, Missouri, in less than ten days. The earliest advertisements appeared in January 1860, and the first pony rider left the Alta Telegraph office in San Francisco at 4:00 p.m. on April 3, 1860. The expressman and his bag of mail did not actually ride off toward St. Joseph. He first boarded the steamer New World and traveled up the Sacramento River to Sacramento. From there another horse and rider galloped off on the first leg of the journey. Several riders and horses were used along the arduous journey, and the mail reached St. Joseph ten days later, on April 13. The operation continued until October 1861.

Commencing July 1, 1861, the Pony Express was authorized by Congress to carry mail at the rate of $1.00 per half ounce. An additional fee was charged by Wells, Fargo & Co. to carry mail from San Francisco to the western terminus at Placerville. The contract also stipulated the mandatory U.S. postage charge of 10c per half ounce. Although the Scott Catalogue lists the July 1861 issue Pony Express stamps (143L3-143L6) with other private post issues, we wish to emphasize that these stamps were issued under the terms of a government mail contract; therefore, they have semi-official status.

Although some of the Horse & Rider stamps were remaindered, they are scarce, and the vast majority do not have four margins or original gum. This choice set would be extremely difficult to duplicate

E. 2,000-3,000
4,500
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151
ngbl
Sale Number 1010, Lot Number 151, Pony Express StampsWells, Fargo & Co. Virginia City Pony Express, 10c Brown, 25c Blue, 25c Red (143L7-143L9), Wells, Fargo & Co. Virginia City Pony Express, 10c Brown, 25c Blue, 25c Red (143L7-143L9)Wells, Fargo & Co. Virginia City Pony Express, 10c Brown, 25c Blue, 25c Red (143L7-143L9). Block of fours, unused (no gum), full to huge margins incl. bottom sheet margins, brilliant colors on fresh paper, horizontal bend in 25c Blue block ending in light crease

EXTREMELY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL FULL SET OF BLOCKS OF THE VIRGINIA CITY PONY EXPRESS ISSUES.

The gold and silver strikes in western Utah Territory between 1859 and 1863 brought a huge influx of miners and settlers into the Carson and Washoe Valley region. At the beginning of the Civil War, the Federal government moved quickly to ensure that the population of eastern California and western Utah Territory -- along with its mineral wealth -- remained loyal to the Union. Congress created Nevada Territory on March 2, 1861, carving out a portion of Utah Territory that included Carson City (the new capital of Nevada Territory), Genoa, Virginia City, Gold Hill, and Aurora. Wells Fargo & Co. and other express companies had long served this region. The transcontinental Pony Express of 1860-61 passed through Carson City and Virginia City. Therefore, when there was demand for a fast express service between San Francisco and Washoe, it was relatively easy for Wells Fargo & Co. to organize a horse-and-rider relay along their existing routes. The "Pony Express to Washoe—Through in 24 Hours" was announced by Wells Fargo & Co. to start running on Monday, August 11, 1862. The schedule provided for a 4 p.m. departure from San Francisco and arrival in Virginia City by "the next evening." Letters sent westbound from Virginia City would leave at 6 p.m. and arrive in San Francisco the "next evening, by Sacramento Boat." From August 1862 through January 1863, the rate for the Virginia City Pony Express was 10c per half-ounce, which was paid by the Brown stamp. Sometime shortly after January 1863, the rate was increased to 25c, and a new stamp was issued in Blue. The 25c rate continued through to the end of the express service, but the stamp color was changed to Red around March 1864.

E. 2,000-3,000
4,500
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