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Sale 988 — The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes

Sale Date — Thursday, 27 May, 2010

Category — Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port Royal

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
208
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 208, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalCamp Davidson, Savannah Ga, Camp Davidson, Savannah GaCamp Davidson, Savannah Ga. Prisoner-of-war cover to Fall River Wis., endorsed "Sent by Capt M.C. Hobart, Prisoner of War, Savannah Ga." and "Via Flag of Truce", manuscript "Ex JH aag" (known Aug. 1864), mixed franking with C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12), tied by Savannah circular datestamp, used with 3c Rose (65), tied by target and "Port Royal S.C. Sep. 5 '64" double-circle datestamp where it entered the U.S. mails, mended tear through cover and 10c stamp, some light staining at bottom and small backflap tear

VERY FINE APPEARING AND RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM CAMP DAVIDSON SENT VIA POCOTALIGO AND PORT ROYAL. APPROXIMATELY SIX ARE KNOWN.

Martin C. Hobart was 25 years of age when he enlisted in Company B, Wisconsin 7th Infantry Regiment (part of the famous "Iron Brigade") in 1861. Promoted to full colonel by the end of the war, he survived the war and prison and was mustered out on July 3, 1865. Camp Davidson, named for its first commander, was created from the old U.S. Marine Hospital to house Union commissioned officers in August 1864. Conditions were considered among the best of C.S.A. prisons, with shade and decent rations (Harrison p. 32). When the camp was liberated by Gen. Sherman in December 1864 after only five months of operation, it held 800 prisoners.

From July 1864 until February 1865, Union P.O.W. mail from Charleston, Savannah and Florence prisons was carried from Pocotaligo S.C. (on the Charleston & Savannah R.R. line) to Union-held Port Royal, S.C. Flag-of-truce mail via South Carolina is considerably rarer than flag-of-truce mail via Virginia. Most surviving covers are inner envelopes, but a few mixed-franking covers like this one are known. The route was closed by the Federal capture of Pocotaligo on January 14, 1865.

Ex Antrim. Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 77)

E. 2,000-3,000
4,000
209
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 209, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalCharleston S.C, Charleston S.CCharleston S.C. Buff cover to Jeffersonville Ind., endorsed "W. J. Marshall Adjt 51st Ind. Vol., Prisoner of War Charleston S.C.", carried by U.S. Naval ship directly from flag-of-truce exchange point, entered U.S. mails with "Philada. Aug. 26, 1864" circular datestamp with "U.S. Ship" and "Due 3" straightline handstamps, Very Fine and choice, an unusual cover sent via Pocotaligo and Port Royal, then direct to Philadelphia, Sgt. Marshall was captured at Rowe Gap on May 3, 1863, he was at Libby Prison from May 13, 1863 to May 6, 1864, Danville Prison from May 7, 1864, and was later known to be at Camp Asylum, this cover could be a Camp Asylum usage in transit through Charleston or from Charleston itself (very scarce either way), illustrated in Special Routes (p. 75)

E. 1,000-1,500
1,700
Back to Top
210
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 210, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalCharleston S.C, Charleston S.CCharleston S.C. Inner prisoner-of-war cover made from ruled note paper, with original letter datelined "C.S. Prison Charleston S.C. Oct 5" endorsed "H E Beeby 2 Lt 22 NY Cav Prisoner of war Charleston SC", censored with manuscript "Exd" (Capt. Hugh Hamilton Rogers, Provost Marshal's Office, Charleston), also endorsed "Soldier letter WT Bennett Lt. Col. & agt ex", entered U.S. mails with "Port Royal S.C. Nov. 13, 1864" double-circle datestamp and "Due 3" rate for soldier letter, writer notes "my health never was any better...I am very fleshy, corn bread agrees with me very well. I would recommend it for some of the invalids in our section a very good thing it is.", minor age spotting, Very Fine and scarce flag-of-truce P.O.W. cover routed via Pocotaligo and Port Royal

E. 500-750
950
Back to Top
211
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 211, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalCharleston S.C, Charleston S.CCharleston S.C. Buff prisoner-of-war inner cover to Burlington Iowa, manuscript "Examined appd JMA aag" censor mark, known used in Nov. 1864 (Harrison p. 45), entered U.S. mails with "Port Royal S.C. Nov. 3, 1864" double-circle datestamp and "Due 3" handstamp, fresh and Very Fine, a scarce flag-of-truce cover sent via Pocotaligo and Port Royal

E. 500-750
275
Back to Top
212
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 212, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalRickersville Hospital, Charleston S.C, Rickersville Hospital, Charleston S.CRickersville Hospital, Charleston S.C. Prisoner-of-war inner cover, with original letter datelined "Charleston S.C. Aug 31 1864, to Washington Pa., prisoner's endorsement at top and "By Flag of Truce via Charleston & Port Royal" at bottom, manuscript censor mark "Ex. J.T.P.", entered U.S. mails with unusually clear "Port Royal S.C. Sep. 5, 1864" double-circle datestamp and "Due 3" handstamp, couple insignificant light stains and minor edgewear

VERY FINE. A RARE P.O.W. COVER FROM RICKERSVILLE HOSPITAL SENT BY FLAG-OF-TRUCE VIA POCOTALIGO AND PORT ROYAL. ONLY FOUR COVERS ARE KNOWN FROM THIS HOSPITAL.

All the covers definitively known to come from Rickersville are from Lt. Oliver R. McNary, a member of Co. E of the 12th Pa. Volunteers (see lot 130 for a related cover). McNary was captured on April 20, 1864 at Plymouth N.C., taken to Andersonville where he attempted to escape, then to Macon from where he did escape on July 30. He was recaptured on August 17, injured during his flight and taken to Rickersville Hospital on August 21. The enclosed letter states, "...(brought) to this place from Macon Geo last week. At present am in the 1st South Carolina Hospital..." He was then moved to Annapolis Hospital on December 4 and finally paroled. A lengthy article on the McNary correspondence can be found in the Confederate Philatelist (Oct. 1961).

Ex Simon

E. 1,500-2,000
1,200
Back to Top
213
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 213, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalCharleston S.C, Charleston S.CCharleston S.C. Inner cover to Hamilton N.Y., docketed in pencil "Written Sept. 25 come Nov. 10.", manuscript "Exd + appd LCC" and "Ex J.O.C." censor markings, latter known used in Nov. 1864 (Harrison p. 45), U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), cancelled by target, entered mails with "Port Royal S.C. Nov. 5, 1864" double-circle datestamp, couple light toning spots, otherwise Very Fine, noted on back to be from Rickersville Hospital but no markings or contents to confirm, nevertheless a scarce flag-of-truce cover sent via Pocotaligo and Port Royal

E. 500-750
275
Back to Top
214
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 214, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalRoper Hospital, Charleston S.C, Roper Hospital, Charleston S.CRoper Hospital, Charleston S.C. Blue inner prisoner-of-war cover, with original letter datelined "Roper Hospital Charleston S.C. Sept. 25. 64", endorsed "From Prisoner of War Per Flag of Truce", manuscript "Exd" (Capt. Hugh Hamilton Rogers, Provost Marshal's Office, Charleston), also endorsed "Soldiers letter Stewart L. Woodford Lt. Col. & agent of exchange", entered U.S. mails with "Port Royal S.C. Oct. 5, 1864" double-circle datestamp and bold "Due 3" rate for soldier letter, the writer notes "After staying in Libby 10 months I made a two month visit to Macon, and since the first of August I have been very comfortably quartered in this city.", part of backflap missing, otherwise Very Fine, scarce flag-of-truce P.O.W. cover routed via Pocotaligo and Port Royal

E. 750-1,000
475
Back to Top
215
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 215, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalFlorence Prison, Florence S.C, Florence Prison, Florence S.CFlorence Prison, Florence S.C. Small folded letter from prisoner-of-war to his wife in Philadelphia Pa., datelined "Florence Prison S. Carolina Oct 12 1864", endorsed "From James Moody, Co K 7th Regt Prisoner of War Camp Florence SC", bold manuscript "Examined", mixed franking with C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12) and U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), both tied by "Port Royal Nov (?) '64" double-circle datestamp, letter states "I have been a prisoner since the 5th of May...We are all in a very destitute condition. I have been very sick for some time but I am something better at present.", edges restored from prior adhesive stains

VERY FINE APPEARING AND EXTREMELY RARE PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER FROM FLORENCE PRISON, SENT BY FLAG-OF-TRUCE VIA POCOTALIGO AND PORT ROYAL. FEWER THAN TEN ARE KNOWN.

According to Wikipedia: "The Florence Stockade was built and became operational in September 1864, and was in use during the final fall and winter of the war. During its time of operation, anywhere from 15,000 to 18,000 captives were held there. The need for additional prisons became imperative after General Sherman captured Atlanta on September 1, 1864. Andersonville prison in south Georgia was thought to be in the path of Sherman and the Confederate prison authorities determined to relocate the approximately 30,000 Union prisoners then at Andersonville. Because Florence had three railroads, and was thought to be secure, it was chosen as a site for a newly constructed prison. To keep the Union soldiers in order during relocation, they were told that they were to be paroled. Many of those who were unable to walk or not stable enough to travel were left behind in Andersonville. Of the total number of prisoners that passed through the Florence Stockade, 2,802 Union soldiers died there and most were buried in unmarked trenches in what would become the Florence National Cemetery after the war."

Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 242)

E. 2,000-3,000
1,700
Back to Top
216
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 216, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalCamp Sorghum, Columbia S.C, Camp Sorghum, Columbia S.CCamp Sorghum, Columbia S.C. Blue adversity cover made from customs declaration form, from prisoner-of-war to Harrisburg Pa., endorsed "From W.A. Robinson Prisoner of War Columbia S.C.", censored "Ex Lt Williams 32 Ga" (32nd Georgia Infantry) on back, also manuscript "Soldiers Letter WT Bennett Lt Col & Agt Ex DS" censor mark in magenta ink, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12) tied by blurry strike of "Charleston S.C. Nov. 10? 186_" circular datestamp, entered U.S. mails with "Port Royal S.C. Nov. 15, 1864" double-circle datestamp, "Due 3" in circle and "Due 3" straightline ties the 10c stamp, some light staining

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A RARE PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER FROM CAMP SORGHUM ROUTED VIA CHARLESTON AND PORT ROYAL.

Camp Sorghum was established in October 1864, but its entire prison population was moved to nearby Camp Asylum on December 12, 1864 for security reasons. The Richland Jail and the College Hospital in Columbia were also used to hold P.O.W.s until the fall of Columbia on February 17, 1865. In total, more than 85 covers are known from Columbia prisons. Northbound P.O.W. mail was initially processed through Columbia, and entered the U.S. mails at Old Point Comfort. In mid-November 1864, mail was processed through Charleston and exchanged via Port Royal, including this cover. Mail was sent via Charleston for only a short time and as such is rare. Starting in early December, mail was once again processed through Columbia and exchanged via Old Point Comfort.

E. 1,000-1,500
1,300
Back to Top
217
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 217, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalJohnson's Island, Sandusky O, Johnson's Island, Sandusky OJohnson's Island, Sandusky O. Prisoner-of-war cover to Walton's Ford Ga., endorsed "Via Richmond Va." at bottom (ignored) with manuscript "Ex. A.M.G." (known Aug. 10-Oct. 26, 1863, Harrison p. 189), also manuscript "Ex FRK" C.S.A. censor mark, mixed franking with C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die A (11), corner margin copy, affixed partly over selvage of 3c Rose (65), tied together by blue circular grid and 10c stamp tied by matching "Sandusky O Aug. 10" circular datestamp, sent via Port Royal and Pocotaligo, carried by military courier from Pocotaligo to Augusta and placed in C.S.A. mails there with partly clear strikes of "Augusta Ga. Aug 30" circular datestamp, received in Walton's Ford with manuscript "To hand Sept 5th 1863", couple tiny cover tears, 3c stamp with faults from placement at top of cover

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL AND EXTREMELY RARE MIXED-FRANKING COVER FROM JOHNSON'S ISLAND PRISON, SENT VIA PORT ROYAL AND POCOTALIGO AND CARRIED BY COURIER TO AUGUSTA. THIS IS THE EARLIEST KNOWN FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER VIA THIS ROUTE.

On November 7, 1861, Federal forces captured the Hilton Head-Port Royal coastal region of southeastern South Carolina. Five months later, on April 11, 1862, the U.S. occupied Fort Pulaski in the harbor of nearby Savannah, Georgia. These actions placed U.S. and C.S.A. forces in close proximity, with the C.S.A. retaining control of the Charleston-Savannah railroad. This resulted in military flag-of-truce exchanges between U.S. controlled Port Royal and C.S.A. controlled Pocotaligo, South Carolina on the Savannah-Charleston railroad. This flag-of-truce route was closed by the Federal capture of Pocotaligo on January 14, 1865.

Surviving covers suggest that flag-of-truce mail began to be carried on this route in August 1863. U.S. prisons in Georgia or South Carolina sent all of their southbound mail by this route, and other U.S. prisons would sometimes send mail addressed to South Carolina or Georgia by this route (such as Johnson's Island). Flag-of-truce mail via South Carolina is considerably rarer than flag-of-truce mail via Virginia. Most surviving covers are inner envelopes, but some mixed franking covers are known. Initially, southbound mail was processed and postmarked at Pocotaligo, but as mail volumes increased, the mail was taken to either Charleston or Savannah for processing. Rarely, southbound mail addressed to Georgia from U.S. prisons would be forwarded from Pocotaligo to Augusta, Georgia, for entry into the C.S.A. mails. This cover is such an example (Special Routes p. 74).

Ex Birkinbine. Illustrated in Special Routes (p.75)

E. 2,000-3,000
2,600
Back to Top
218
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 218, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalElmira Prison, N.Y, Elmira Prison, N.YElmira Prison, N.Y. Yellow homemade prisoner-of-war cover to Spartanburg S.C., bold oval handstamp "Prisoner's Letter, Elmira, N.Y. Examined", mixed franking with U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), crease and small tear, tied by "Elmira N.Y. Sep. 24, 1864" double-circle datestamp, C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12), slightly cut in, entered C.S.A. mails with "Charleston S.C. Oct. 20, 1864" circular datestamp which ties both adhesives

VERY FINE. A RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM ELMIRA PRISON, SENT VIA PORT ROYAL AND POCOTALIGO AND TAKEN TO CHARLESTON FOR PROCESSING.

This cover was sent through Port Royal but received no C.S.A. markings until it entered the mails at Charleston. Mail from Elmira and other U.S. prisons in the North to the C.S.A. was normally routed via Fortress Monroe and Richmond. A tiny percentage of mail, addressed to Georgia or South Carolina, was sent via Fort Royal. No more than five from U.S. northern prisons are known.

Ex Kohn. Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 232)

E. 2,000-3,000
2,800
Back to Top
219
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 219, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalFort Delaware, Delaware City, Fort Delaware, Delaware CityFort Delaware, Delaware City. Prisoner-of-war cover to Charleston S.C., endorsed "By flag of truce via Fortress Monroe", 3c Rose (65) canceled by target, "Delaware City Del. Nov. 15" circular datestamp, "Charleston S.C. Jan. 7, 1865" circular datestamp ties the 3c stamp, bold strike of "2" drop rate handstamp

EXTREMELY FINE COVER FROM FORT DELAWARE PRISON, SENT VIA PORT ROYAL AND BY LOCAL FLAG-OF-TRUCE BOAT TO CHARLESTON.

This unusual cover was sent via Port Royal and Charleston with C.S.A. postage due at the 2c drop rate.

Ex Birkinbine. Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 76)

E. 4,000-5,000
2,000
Back to Top
220
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 220, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalU.S.S. Dragoon, "Confederate 50", off Hilton Head S.C, U.S.S. Dragoon, "Confederate 50", off Hilton Head S.CU.S.S. Dragoon, "Confederate 50", off Hilton Head S.C. Prisoner-of-war cover to Prince Edward Co. Va., endorsed "J. P. Fitzgerald Lt Col 23rd Regt Va. Infty" and "By Flag of Truce Via Charleston SC", censored by C.S.A. with manuscript "Ex N. Soule Cpt. a.a.g.", entered mails at Charleston through local flag-of-truce exchange with "Charleston S.C. Jul. 19" (1864) double-circle datestamp and "Paid 10" circular handstamp, no contents but apparently part of response written on back (dated July 26), cover with some soiling and split on three sides

VERY FINE AND EXTREMELY RARE LOCAL FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER FROM ONE OF THE "CONFEDERATE 50" PRISONERS ON BOARD THE U.S.S. DRAGOON OFF HILTON HEAD -- THE PREDECESSORS TO THE WELL-KNOWN "IMMORTAL 600."

On June 13, 1864, U.S. Major General John Foster, in command of the Department of the South at Hilton Head S.C. received a message from C.S.A. Major General Samuel Jones, commander of Confederate forces at Charleston, that five generals and 45 field officers had been transferred as prisoners-of-war to Charleston, which was under bombardment of Federal batteries. Foster immediately retaliated by ordering an equal number of prisoners of the same grade to be brought south and exposed to Confederate guns from Charleston. These 50 Confederate prisoners were taken from Fort Delaware and delivered to Gen. Foster at Hilton Head. Gen. Jones immediately proposed an exchange, which was completed on August 2.

From their arrival on June 29 until their exchange, the Confederate officers were held aboard the U.S.S. Dragoon off Hilton Head, in extreme conditions. According to Harrison (p. 222): "...for many days they had only bread to eat, but that was good because the meat when it was served was so decayed and disgusting that it had to be thrown overboard." The prisoners were allowed to write letters, but the short time they were on board the Dragoon accounts for the extreme rarity of known covers. (Harrison records only five). Shortly after their exchange, 600 more Federal prisoners were brought to Charleston and this touched off the famous "Immortal 600" incident.

Illustrated in Harrison (p. 223)

E. 2,000-3,000
2,900
Back to Top
221
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 221, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalMarine Hospital, "Charleston 600", S.C, Marine Hospital, "Charleston 600", S.CMarine Hospital, "Charleston 600", S.C. Yellow inner prisoner-of-war cover to Castleton Vt. with original letter datelined "C.S. Military Prison Charleston S.C. August 2, 1864", prisoner's endorsement on front, censored with manuscript "Exd. HHR" (Capt. Hugh Hamilton Rogers, Provost Marshal's Office, Charleston), entered U.S. mails with "Port Royal S.C. Aug. 20, 1864" circular datestamp and "Due 3"

VERY FINE COVER FROM ONE OF THE 600 UNION OFFICERS HELD IN CHARLESTON UNDER FIRE FROM FEDERAL FORCES ON MORRIS ISLAND.

The officer who sent this letter was captured June 29, 1864, during the Wilson-Kautz cavalry raid at Stony Creek Va. His letter states in part "We moved from Macon last week and arrived here yesterday...There are six hundred prisoners here -- all officers". The Charleston 600 were the U.S. prisoners for whom Union General John Foster retaliated by bringing the Confederate "Immortal 600" to Morris Island. This cover is especially desirable with the prisoner's letter and reference to the "six hundred".

E. 1,500-2,000
1,300
Back to Top
222
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 222, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalU.S.S. Crescent City, "Immortal 600", S.C, U.S.S. Crescent City, "Immortal 600", S.CU.S.S. Crescent City, "Immortal 600", S.C. Buff inner prisoner-of-war cover to Liberty Hill S.C., endorsed "Lt. W. E. Johnson, Prisoner of War" and "By Flag of Truce", sent from the U.S.S. Crescent City, "Charleston S.C. Sep. 2" (1864) circular datestamp and "Paid 10" handstamp

VERY FINE COVER FROM ONE OF THE IMMORTAL "600" ON THE U.S.S. CRESCENT CITY, JUST PRIOR TO BEING PLACED ON MORRIS ISLAND.

In August 1864, approximately 600 Confederate prisoners were moved on the Crescent City to Morris Island near Charleston by Federal forces, arriving on the island on September 7. They were held in open barracks as "human shields" under direct shelling from Confederate forces in retaliation for Union prisoners being held in Charleston under shelling from U.S. forces, a continuation and escalation of the prior "50" prisoner incident. Lt. Johnson was a member of Company K of the 7th S.C. Cavalry. He was captured on May 30, 1864, at Old Church Va., and taken to Fort Delaware, then to Morris Island as one of the "600". He was sent to Fort Pulaksi when the prisoners were moved from Morris Island on October 23 and finally back to Fort Delaware.

Ex Harrison

E. 1,500-2,000
2,000
Back to Top
223
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 223, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalMorris Island, "Immortal 600", S.C, Morris Island, "Immortal 600", S.CMorris Island, "Immortal 600", S.C. Inner prisoner-of-war cover to Liberty Hill S.C., endorsed "W. E. Johnson, Prisoner of War" with photocopy of original letter datelined "Morris Island Sept 27th 1864", bold "Charleston S.C. Oct. 4, 1864" circular datestamp and "10" due handstamp, routed from Port Royal via Charleston

VERY FINE AND CHOICE COVER FROM ONE OF THE IMMORTAL "600" ON MORRIS ISLAND.

In August 1864, approximately 600 Confederate prisoners were moved to Morris Island near Charleston by Federal forces, arriving on September 7. They were held in open barracks as "human shields" under direct shelling from Confederate forces in retaliation for Union prisoners being held in Charleston under shelling from U.S. forces. This cover is from the same officer as the prior Crescent City cover and the following Fort Pulaski covers.

Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 236)

E. 1,000-1,500
1,300
Back to Top
224
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 224, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalMorris Island, "Immortal 600", S.C, Morris Island, "Immortal 600", S.CMorris Island, "Immortal 600", S.C. Inner prisoner-of-war cover to Bridgewater Va., soldier's endorsement and "By Flag of Truce via Charleston S.C.", entered C.S.A. mails with "Charleston S.C. Oct. 6" (1864) circular datestamp and "10" handstamp with manuscript "due", couple small tears and some tape residue on back, still Fine, a desirable cover sent from one of the Morris Island "600" before they were removed in late October, a fascinating and well-known story of the War

E. 500-750
1,300
Back to Top
225
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 225, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalFort Pulaski, "Immortal 600", Ga, Fort Pulaski, "Immortal 600", GaFort Pulaski, "Immortal 600", Ga. Buff inner prisoner-of-war cover to Liberty Hill S.C., endorsed "W. E. Johnson, Prisoner of War" and "By Flag of Truce", with photocopy of original letter datelined "Fort Pulaski Geo Dec 28th 1864", red manuscript "Ex" censor mark, "Charleston SC Jan. 8" (1865) double-circle datestamp and large "10" C.S.A. due handstamp, unsealed for censoring, routed via Port Royal and Charleston, small inconsequential tear at right, Very Fine, this cover is from the same prisoner as the prior U.S.S. Crescent City and Morris Island lots and the following Fort Pulaski lot, in late October 1864, the prisoners from Morris Island, who had been exposed to mortar fire from their own Confederate batteries in Charleston, were moved to Fort Pulaski at the mouth of the Savannah River, conditions were not much better there as they were forced to subsist on a near starvation diet, ex Kohn, illustrated and discussed in an article by Brian Green and Patricia Kaufmann in the 1971 American Philatelic Congress book

E. 750-1,000
650
Back to Top
226
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 226, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalFort Pulaski, "Immortal 600", Ga, Fort Pulaski, "Immortal 600", GaFort Pulaski, "Immortal 600", Ga. Buff inner prisoner-of-war cover to Liberty Hill S.C., endorsed "M. W. E. Johnson, Prisoner of War, Fort Pulaski", with photocopy of original letter datelined "Fort Pulaski Sunday morning Nov 20th 1864", "Savannah Geo. Nov. 20" with star circular datestamp and "10" due handstamp, unsealed for censoring, routed via Port Royal and then back to Savannah to enter C.S.A. mails, fresh and Very Fine usage, from the same prisoner as the prior Morris Island and Fort Pulaski lots and an excellent companion to those covers, in late October 1864 the prisoners from Morris Island, who had been exposed to mortar fire from their Confederate batteries, were moved to Fort Pulaski at the mouth of the Savannah River, conditions were not much better there as they were forced to subsist on a near starvation diet

E. 750-1,000
650
Back to Top
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