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Sale 824 — 2000 Rarities of the World

Sale Date — Saturday, 13 May, 2000

Category — Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
337
 
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 337, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (594), 1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (594)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (594). Light machine cancel, deep shade, remarkably choice centering for this difficult stamp

EXTREMELY FINE. SOUND COPIES OF THE 1923 ROTARY PERF 11 ISSUE RARE, AND ONLY A FEW HAVE THE CENTERING AND MARGINS OF THIS SUPERB STAMP.

The 1c Green, Scott 594, is waste from a horizontal rotary printing used to make coils. At the beginning or end of a coil-stamp print run from the 170-subject rotary plates, some leading or trailing paper was produced that was too short for rolling into 500-stamp rolls. In 1919 the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. They were put through the flat-plate perforator in use at the time, giving the sheets full perforations on all sides. In 1923 coil waste from the new 1c and 2c rotary production was turned into stamps later classified as Scott 578-579 and 594-595. These were the last of the coil-waste issues. Fewer than 100 survive of Scott 594 today.

With 1995 P.F. certificate

5,500
11,000
338
 
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 338, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596). Bold "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, fine impression, well-centered for this difficult stamp with perfs clear all around

VERY FINE AND CHOICE SOUND COPY OF SCOTT 596. AMONG THE FINEST OF THE TWELVE RECORDED EXAMPLES, OF WHICH ONLY SEVEN ARE SOUND. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continually applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their flat plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there is some leading or trailing paper that is too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject plates. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Scott 596 is waste from a vertical rotary press printing used to make sheet stamps -- a fact proven by the existence of precancelled copies such as the example offered here.

Our updated census of Scott 596 published in our Zoellner sale (and available at our web site at: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/census/596/596.htm) records twelve used stamps. Of these, seven are precancelled at Kansas City Mo. There are no known unused examples.

Census No. 596-CAN-11. Ex Isleham. With 1964, 1992 and 1994 P.F. certificates

45,000
95,000
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339
c
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 339, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)2c Harding, Perf 11 (610), 2c Harding, Perf 11 (610)2c Harding, Perf 11 (610). Three First Day covers with George W. Linn cachet, each different sizes (Sizes IIa, IIIa and IIIb), all with "In Memorium, Warren G. Harding Twenty-Ninth President, Born Nov. 2, 1865, Died Aug. 2, 1923" at lower left, and "Marion Ohio Sep. 1, 1923" postmark, different thicknesses of mourning borders, Fine-Very Fine group of scarce Linn's cacheted Harding covers, widely recognized as the first cacheted First Day Covers, Planty's Photo Encyclopedia of Cacheted F.D.C.'s states that "All complete classic collections [of FDC's] should start with this cover" -- a set of four realized $2,400 hammer in last year's Rarities sale.

E. 1,500-2,000
1,700
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340
c
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 340, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)2c Harding, Perf 11 (610), 2c Harding, Perf 11 (610)2c Harding, Perf 11 (610). Six uncacheted First Day covers comprising: two from Marion O.; two from Caledonia O.; one from Bucyrus O.; last from Brooklyn N.Y., Very Fine and extremely rare group. The first five were prepared by William G. Windhurst, who owned and operated the Waldorf Pharmacy across the street from the Marion post office where the Harding stamps were sold. There are seven different types of Windhurst covers known, five of which are represented here. They are differentiated by the postmark city, presence of pharmacy imprint, address and pharmacy advertisement. This is a wonderful opportunity for the Harding collector to acquire the rare Windhurst first day covers of which only a few are known. This is the first time they have been offered as a group at public auction.

E. 3,000-4,000
0
Back to Top
341
c
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 341, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)2c Harding, Perf 11 (610), 2c Harding, Perf 11 (610)2c Harding, Perf 11 (610). Complete set of seven different uncacheted unofficial First Day covers from the Ohio towns of Dublin, Columbus, Delaware, Linworth, Powell, Waldo and Worthington, the Columbus has natural s.e. at left, all prepared by George W. Linn, five addressed to him in Columbus O., other two also addressed to Columbus, fresh and Very Fine, mailed by Linn on his way home after sending some first day covers at Marion, the official city of issue, a similar group realized $1,600 in last year's Rarities sale

E. 1,500-2,000
1,600
Back to Top
342
 
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 342, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)2c Harding, Rotary Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary Perf 11 (613). Incredibly well-centered, sharp impression, light wavy-line machine cancel, insignificant faint corner crease at top left not mentioned on accompanying certificate

EXTREMELY FINE CENTERING AND VIRTUALLY PERFECT CONDITION. AMONG THE TOP FIVE OF THE 43 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11 STAMPS RECORDED IN OUR CENSUS.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. The Weills found three additional singles among unsorted 2c stamps soaked off envelopes.

Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method distinguishes sheet-waste stamps -- Scott 544, 596 and 613 -- from the coil-waste stamps and explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp (as published in our Zoellner sale and available at our web site at: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/census/613/613.htm) records 39 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all) and two used pairs. Of the singles, 22 are sound, but of these only five rate a grading of Very Fine or Extremely Fine. The stamp offered here certainly ranks in the top five in centering and, in our opinion, in the top ten in desirability.

Census No. 613-CAN-16. With 1978 P.F. certificate

25,000
37,500
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