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Sale 811 — 1999 Rarities of the World

Sale Date — Saturday, 15 May, 1999

Category — Pioneer Flight Covers

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
239°
c
Sale Number 811, Lot Number 239, Pioneer Flight CoversCharles A, Charles ACharles A. Lindbergh's Nonstop Transatlantic Flight in The Spirit of St. Louis, New York to Paris, May 20-21, 1927. 4-1/8 by 9-1/2 inch cover with red and blue printed design, including "State of Illinois, Springfield" corner card, map of Illinois and profile of Abraham Lincoln ("Where Lincoln Lives") at center, winged shield and "Via Aerial Mail" route designation at lower left, and postage requirements in frame at upper right, typewritten address to "Mr. G. J. Brandeweide, 6958 Mardel Ave., St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A.", typewritten sender's address at upper left "From Capt. Charles A. Lindbergh, Paris, France", five-line typewritten endorsement "This letter was carried by Capt. Charles A. Lind-/bergh in his monoplane, Orteig/Contest, New York to Paris and/mailed by him at Paris, France" -- prepared in advance of the flight and carried by Lindbergh -- signed "C. A. Lindbergh" and marked "Register" in his hand at upper right, opened at right; accompanied by Lindbergh's autograph note on American Embassy stationery ("Regards, Charles A. Lindbergh") and the large registered-mail cover used to return the souvenir flight cover to Gregory J. Brandeweide, bearing 3fr and 1fr stamps of France, cancelled at Paris on May 28, 1927, registry label and American Embassy return address, manuscript "Pouch" indicating that the cover and contents were carried in a United States diplomatic pouch

ONE OF TWO PIECES OF MAIL CARRIED BY CHARLES A. LINDBERGH ABOARD THE SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS ON HIS EPOCHAL NONSTOP TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT FROM NEW YORK TO PARIS. ARGUABLY THE MOST SIGNIFICANT POSTAL-HISTORY ARTIFACT OF THE 20TH CENTURY.

Upon arriving at Le Bourget Aerodrome in Paris 33-1/2 hours after taking off from Roosevelt Field on Long Island, Charles A. Lindbergh, a 25-year old American mail pilot, achieved historic fame as the first person to fly nonstop across the Atlantic. In technical aviation terms, his accomplishment displayed awesome navigating and flying skills, as well as phenomenal endurance. In more abstract terms, Lindbergh's flight fueled the age of aviation. President Coolidge, in bestowing the National Geographic Society's Hubbard Gold Medal, praised Lindbergh's achievement with these words: "Transportation and communication are essential to civilization. Within the year an encouragement has been given to their development that has few parallels in history. The principles of aviation were demonstrated first by Americans at the turn of the last century. In the intervening years their science progressed, both here and abroad. Important flights were made. It remained for one of our own citizens in May 1927 to arouse universal interest in the practical possibilities of travel through the air. His flight, alone and unaided, from New York to Paris thrilled the world. It appealed to the imagination of humanity...Because of what he has said and done we are told aeronautic plans for 1928 indicate an activity far beyond any dreams of six months ago."

The practical possibilities of flight were significant in Lindbergh's aspirations. As a mail pilot flying under contract for the United States Post Office Department, Lindbergh was familiar with the great risks of flight and the small reward. The fledgling Air Mail Service inaugurated in 1918 depended on a corps of aviators who flew at the mercy of mechanics and weather. Between October 1919 and July 1921, accidents claimed the lives of 26 Air Mail Service employees, including 19 pilots. Lindbergh, despite crashing on his own route between St. Louis and Chicago, held strongly to his vision of future flight, writing "What limitless possibilities aviation holds when planes can fly nonstop between New York and Paris! The year will surely come when passengers and mail fly every day from America to Europe. Of course flying will cost much more than transportation by surface ship; but letters can be written on light-weight paper, and there'll be people with such pressing business that they can afford the higher price of passage."

In preparing for his flight, Lindbergh's concern over fuel consumption outweighed most other considerations, including his personal comfort and safety. The Spirit of St. Louis was especially constructed for the 3,500-mile flight, becoming a virtual flying fuel tank. The pilot's foreward window was sacrificed for fuel storage, and all equipment except items deemed absolutely essential was discarded. Mail, which Lindbergh was accustomed to carrying, also had to be sacrificed. In one account, after realizing how much excess fuel was available as he neared Paris, Lindbergh lamented "The gasoline left in my tanks when I reach France will weigh more than all the mail one of our DH's can carry between St. Louis and Chicago...I could have brought thousands of letters to Paris." In fact, by his own account, he brought only two pieces of mail, six letters of introduction and a business card. He stated "I'm taking one letter for Postmaster Conkling of Springfield -- I couldn't say no to him -- and one letter for my friend Gregory Brandeweide, who worked with me laying out the mail route. That's all -- except for my messages of introduction." It is likely that the Conkling and Brandeweide covers were carried on the St. Louis-to-New York leg of the flight that originated in San Diego. The nine items carried by Lindbergh are well-documented in The American Air Mail Catalogue (pages 1417-1420).

In 1977, fifty years after Lindbergh's historic flight, our firm offered the Brandeweide cover in the Rarities of the World sale, where it fetched the then-extraordinary record-breaking sum of $35,000. Now, as we soon enter the 21st century, this artifact from one of this century's pivotal events will be offered again.

E. 150,000-200,000
155,000
240
 
Sale Number 811, Lot Number 240, Pioneer Flight CoversCharles A. Lindbergh, Charles A. LindberghCharles A. Lindbergh. Signature "Charles A. Lindbergh" on cover of menu for luncheon held by Ministry of Foreign Affairs in honor of Lindbergh on May 26th, printed seal and title on front cover, along with signatures of 18 guests including Foreign Minister Aristide Briand, War Minister Painleve, President Doumergue and Ambassador Herrick, mounted in frame with portrait, small stain on menu page, a rare memento of this historic event

E. 3,000-4,000
1,900
Back to Top
241
 
Sale Number 811, Lot Number 241, Pioneer Flight CoversLindbergh Souvenir Covers and Collateral, Lindbergh Souvenir Covers and CollateralLindbergh Souvenir Covers and Collateral. A few hundred items, including signed cover, "C.A. Lindbergh Apr. 17, '28" on back of airmail cover as a favor to Mayor J. Coombs, 36 Lindbergh Day souvenir covers, 24 "Good Will" Tour covers from Central America and a few other related souvenir covers, in addition to philatelic material there are bulging folders with original letters and forms related to Robertson Aircraft Corp.'s airmail contract, an original pen-and-ink drawing by Postmaster Conkling of the design used for cachet on Lindbergh's first flight from Chicago to St. Louis, two booklets showing gifts given to Lindbergh from different nations, a fascinating group

E. 1,000-1,500
2,100
Back to Top
242°
c
Sale Number 811, Lot Number 242, Pioneer Flight CoversAmelia Earhart, Amelia EarhartAmelia Earhart. Large cover inscribed "Carried by air Honolulu-Oakland January 11-12, 1935" and signed by Earhart, her handwriting at bottom notes "No. 32 of 49 covers", cover bears 3c Deep Violet (720) and 6c Dull Orange Air Post (C19) tied by two clear strikes of "Honolulu Hawaii Jan. 11, 1935" duplex postmarks, Oakland receiving datestamp, immaculate condition

EXTREMELY FINE AND CHOICE. CARRIED ABOARD THE FIRST NON-STOP SOLO FLIGHT FROM HAWAII TO CALIFORNIA.

Amelia Earhart was the first to make the 2,400 mile solo non-stop flight from Hawaii to the mainland United States. Most covers have the arrival postmark on the back. This example is more desirable in that all markings are on the front of the cover

AAMC catalogue No. 1225

E. 1,500-2,000
3,500
Back to Top
243
c
Sale Number 811, Lot Number 243, Pioneer Flight CoversAmelia Earhart, Amelia EarhartAmelia Earhart. Signature on red and blue cacheted 1937 Round-the-World Flight cover with the aviatrix's portrait, addressed to Edward C. Wray in Oakland Cal., unfranked, this cover was evidently neither flown nor mailed, but signed examples from her ill-fated round-the-world flight are rare (most were destroyed), fresh and Very Fine

E. 1,000-1,500
1,300
Back to Top
244
c
Sale Number 811, Lot Number 244, Pioneer Flight Covers1933, July 23, Flight by Captain and Mrs. Mollison, Pendine, Wales to New York (AAMC 1185), 1933, July 23, Flight by Captain and Mrs. Mollison, Pendine, Wales to New York (AAMC 1185)1933, July 23, Flight by Captain and Mrs. Mollison, Pendine, Wales to New York (AAMC 1185). Typewritten "Per Airplane 'Seafarer'/London-New York/June 1933" and autographed by both, letter addressed to New York

VERY FINE AND VERY RARE TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT COVER. ONLY FOUR COVERS WERE CARRIED ABOARD THIS FLIGHT.

The plane crossed the Atlantic successfully but ran out of gas and was forced down in a marsh at Stratford, Connecticut. The plane was wrecked and both pilots were injured. All covers from this flight have the stamps floated off and some water staining. Accompanied by photograph of the route and of the plane prior to the crash. Ex Krinsky

E. 1,500-2,000
1,500
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