Sale 804 — The Robert Zoellner Collection of United States

Sale Date — Thursday-Saturday, 8-10 October, 1998

Category — One-Cent 1857-60 Issue

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
94
 
Sale 804, Lot 94, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. I (18). Plate 12, perfectly centered, deep rich color and attractive plate wash typical of Plate 12 printing, red New York City carrier datestamp, Extremely Fine Gem, a beautiful example of Type I perforated, with 1992 P.F. certificate

560
1,450
95
c
Sale 804, Lot 95, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. I (18). Plate 12, beautifully centered with wide top and bottom margins showing full design characteristics, rich color, tied by blue "Clarksville Ten. Apr. 24, 1861" circular datestamp on 1c Blue Star Die entire to Henderson Ky., Extremely Fine, extremely rare combination used early in the Civil War, ex Gibson and Grunin

E. 1,000-1,500
1,400
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96
 
Sale 804, Lot 96, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 92L4, wide-spaced perforations at top and bottom, perfectly centered with wide margins at right and left, rich color, lightly cancelled by Boston circular datestamp

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THE FINEST RECORDED SINGLE OF THE RARE TYPE IA PERFORATED STAMP. VERY FEW EXIST WITH WIDE-SPACED PERFORATIONS.

Type Ia stamps were produced from 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. After perforations were introduced in mid-1857, sheets on hand printed from Plates 1 Late and 2 were fed through the new perforating machine, but the narrow spaces between stamps made perforating difficult to accomplish without cutting into the designs. Plate 4 was produced in early 1857 when the introduction of perforations was anticipated; thus, it was entered from a new six-relief transfer roll, and the spaces between stamps were enlarged to allow for perforations. Some Plate 4 sheets were issued in imperforate form (April to June 1857), while the greater portion was issued perforated beginning in July 1857, along with perforated sheets from Plates 1L and 2.

Plate 4's most distinctive feature is that the top row (Pos. 1-10L and 1-10R) was entered with the designs complete at top (Type II) and the bottom row (Pos. 91-100L and 91-100R) was entered with designs complete or nearly complete at bottom (Types Ia and Ic). Although the plate layout provided sufficient space for perforations, the height of the top-row and bottom-row designs was larger than others in the sheet, which resulted in perforations cutting into either the top or bottom rows, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. Type Ia and Ic stamps from the bottom row are almost always cut into at bottom, an unfortunate situation for collectors because the bottom part of the design is what makes Type Ia and Ic stamps desirable.

The exceptions to the normal cut-into condition of top-row and bottom-row Plate 4 stamps are those with wide-spaced perforations. It has been assumed for years that the pins of the bottom row of the perforator were reset to create more space, but some students of the 1851-57 Issue have begun to reexamine this aspect of Plate 4 production to seek alternative explanations for wide-spaced perforations. Whatever the cause, wide-spaced stamps are extremely rare and highly desirable, because they exhibit all of the features that define their respective types. The so-called Waterhouse strip (ex Sir Nicholas Waterhouse, Saul Newbury and Mortimer Neinken; illustrated on p. 280 of the Neinken book) is the most famous of 1c 1857 Type Ia wide-spaced examples. Although a small number of single wide-spaced stamps are recorded, the example offered in this sale is the best-centered and one of the few completely sound stamps. When it was acquired by the late Amos Eno decades ago, this extraordinary stamp realized ten times Scott Catalogue value. In 1993 our firm sold this stamp by private treaty to Mr. Zoellner for the same multiple of Scott value.

Ashbrook states: "I consider perforated Type IA stamps that are not touched by perforations as the rarest stamps in the 1857 perforated issue." (Neinken book, p. 279). The Scott Catalogue contains a footnote to the basic price quotes: "Copies of this stamp exist with perforations not touching the design at any point. Such copies command very high prices."

Ex Eno

4,000
50,000
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97
c
Sale 804, Lot 97, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. Ia (19). Position 94R4, extraordinarily well-centered with perforations just barely touching bottom plumes, bright shade and proof-like impression, tied by single clear strike of "New-York Aug. 1" circular datestamp on folded 1857 circular printed on blue lettersheet to Providence R.I.

EXTREMELY FINE GEM STAMP AND AN IMMACULATE COVER. THIS BEAUTIFUL TYPE IA COVER WAS FEATURED PROMINENTLY IN THE WILLIAM WEST AND SAUL NEWBURY SALES AND IS REGARDED BY MANY AS THE FINEST SINGLE KNOWN ON COVER.

As explained in the description for lot 96, Type Ia was produced only by 18 of the 20 bottom-row positions on Plate 4. Imperforate sheets from Plate 4 were issued in April 1857, but the plate was created in anticipation of the introduction of perforations, which occurred in mid-1857. Although Plate 4 was designed with space between the stamps sufficient to accommodate perforations, the height of the engraved designs in the top row (Type II complete at top) and bottom row (Type Ia or Ic complete or nearly complete at bottom) resulted in perforations cutting into the design, either at top or bottom, depending on which direction the sheet was fed into the perforator. For this reason, Type Ia stamps with perforations clear of the design are extremely rare and desirable. The stamp on this cover was considered by Ashbrook to be one of the finest examples of the perforated Type Ia in existence (the West catalogue states "Stanley Ashbrook stops for about an hour to gloat over this piece which he considers the finest 1c 1857 cover known to American Philately"). It is at least the equal of the off-cover Type Ia stamp in our sale of the Dr. Vernon R. Morris collection (Sale 793), which realized $18,700.

Ex West, Newbury and Grunin (where it realized $16,500 versus then-current Scott value of $3,250)

5,250
32,500
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98
ogbl
Sale 804, Lot 98, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. II (20). Positions 52-57/62-67/72-77/82-87/92-97R2, block of 30 from right pane of Plate 2, early proof-like impression with various double transfers including Pos. 93R pronounced shift in bust color, full original gum, lightly hinged, intense shade and rich color, well-centered, top left stamp has large nick into design, second horizontal row faintly creased, some separations

VERY FINE. THE LARGEST RECORDED PERFORATED BLOCK FROM PLATE 2. A MAGNIFICENT AND EXTTREMELY RARE MULTIPLE WITH ORIGINAL GUM.

After carefully comparing and matching perforations, we have determined that this block of 30 was originally joined with the famous 99R2 block (Pos. 78-80/88-90/98-100R2) offered in lot 101. Both blocks were once part of the Caspary collection; another block in the Caspary sale (lot 596) also fits into this large multiple, filling Positions 58-59/68-69R2. There are three or four other blocks (unplated) in the Caspary and West sales that could also fit into the original large multiple.

Plate 2 was made before perforating was considered, thus the spaces between stamps are too narrow to accommodate perforations. The majority of stamps from Plate 2 was issued imperforate from December 1855 through June 1857. Perforated 1c stamps were issued beginning in July 1857, and Plate 2 (along with Plate 4) was used until replaced by new plates in late 1857. Plate 2 multiples with original gum are far rarer perforated than in imperforate form. The converse is true for multiples from Plate 4. Although Type II perforated blocks with original gum are abundant from 1861 printings (Plates 11-12), Type II perforated blocks from Plate 2 are exceedingly rare. This is also reflected in Position 99R2, which is rare imperforate (unused or used), extremely rare as a used perforated stamp, and unique as an unused perforated stamp (see lot 101). In our opinion, the Scott Catalogue undervalues Plate 2 perforated stamps, perhaps reflecting a market skewed by the availability of Type II's from other plates.

Ex Caspary, Seymour and Bechtel. Scott Retail for six blocks and three pairs

29,100
32,500
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99
og
Sale 804, Lot 99, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. II (20). Position 10R4--one of the top-row Plate 4 positions showing the complete design at top and the only double transfer on Plate 4--full original gum, well-centered, deep rich color and fine impression, Extremely Fine, Ashbrook states "The lone double transfer, 10R4, is a very rare stamp, in fact, it ranks among the rarest of double transfers of the one cent 1851-1857. I have seen very few copies, and only one pair, containing 10R4." (Neinken book, p. 270). The accompanying 1981 P.F. certificate states "sweated o.g.", a totally unwarranted comment about the pristine original gum on this stamp. Scott Retail for Pos. 10R4 used is $1,350.00

E. 3,000-4,000
2,300
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100
 
Sale 804, Lot 100, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. II (20). Plate 2, perfectly centered, rich color, lightly cancelled by town datestamp, Extremely Fine Gem, with 1984 P.F. certificate

225
575
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101
ogbl
Sale 804, Lot 101, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. III, Position 99R2 (21). Center stamp in bottom row of block of nine, Positions 78-80/88-90/98-100R2, center stamp is Pos. 89R, the major double transfer, large bottom sheet margin, full original gum, center horizontal row is Mint Never Hinged, rich color and early impression showing complete line at bottom of Pos. 100R (Type II at this stage), top left stamp has small tear, top right pair faintly creased, bottom right stamp has small thin spot, none of these trivial flaws affecting the appearance of the block or the Type III 99R2 stamp

VERY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED UNUSED EXAMPLE OF THE PERFORATED TYPE III, POSITION 99R2, SHOWING THE WIDEST BREAKS AT TOP AND BOTTOM OF ANY TYPE III POSITION. ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING ITEMS IN CLASSIC UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

On Plate 2, 198 of the 200 positions were Type II. Position 100R was Type II in the early stage of the plate, but as wear began to weaken the bottom line, it became Type IIIa with a small break at bottom. Positions 89R and 99R on Plate 2 have been the focus of special attention, because of their unusual nature. Ashbrook states: "A study of the double transfers of 89R2 and 99R2 is most interesting, because here in a vertical pair of positions we have two distinct varieties... The 99R2 stamp is a fresh entry that was short transferred both at top and bottom over an original entry that had been erased... The stamp, 89R2, is a re-entry, but not in the proper sense of this term, because the re-entry on the lower part of this position was an error, as it was not made to correct an existent fault of the original 89R transfer."

As explained in the description for lot 98, Plate 2 stamps were issued imperforate from December 1855 through June 1857. Beginning in July 1857 stamps from Plates 1 Late, 2 and 4 were issued with perforations, and Plates 2 and 4 continued to produce stamps through late 1857. Plate 2 stamps are rarer perforated than in imperforate form; conversely, Plate 4 stamps are rarer imperforate than in perforated form. Unused multiples of Plate 2 perforated stamps are very rare, and perforated 99R2 stamps are of extreme rarity with perhaps 12 to 15 examples known in any condition. This block, containing the only recorded unused example of 99R2, was originally joined with the block in lot 98.

Illustrated in Neinken book (p. 195). Ex Caspary, Lilly, Grunin (where it realized $65,000 in 1976) and Ishikawa (where the current Scott Catalogue value of $110,000 was established in 1993). With 1993 P.F. certificate

110,000
85,000
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102
 
Sale 804, Lot 102, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. III (21). Plate 4, rich color and fine impression, perfectly centered, face-free light blue cancel at lower left, Extremely Fine Gem

1,625
3,250
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103
 
Sale 804, Lot 103, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IIIa-III (22-21). Plate 4, horizontal pair, well-centered, deep rich color, fine impression, full clear strike of red "U.S. Mail/City Delivery/1" New York City carrier datestamp, few perf separations, Very Fine and choice, exceptionally colorful, ex Emerson, with 1983 P.F. certificate

2,250
5,500
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104
 
Sale 804, Lot 104, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IIIa (22). Plate 11, B relief, well-centered, bright shade, Extremely Fine, ex Levi

400
800
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105
 
Sale 804, Lot 105, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IIIa (22). Plate 11 or 12, well-centered, dark shade and fine impression, New York circular datestamp, Very Fine

400
0
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106
c
Sale 804, Lot 106, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IIIa (22). Plate 11, perfectly centered with wide margins all around showing wide break in top line, couple tiny nibbed perfs, tied by blue grid, matching "University of Virginia Mar. 8, 1861" double-circle datestamp on lady's cover to Richmond, Extremely Fine Gem stamp and beautiful cover, ex Grunin

E. 1,000-1,500
1,500
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107
c
Sale 804, Lot 107, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IIIa (22). Plate 11, horizontal strip of three, remarkably well-centered, rich color, tied by "Paid" grids, red "Boston Ms." circular datestamp on cover to Marblehead Mass., docketed 1861, Very Fine strip and attractive cover, ex Gibson and Grunin

E. 1,000-1,500
800
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108
 
Sale 804, Lot 108, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IV (23). Position 37R1, incredibly well-centered, lightly cancelled by rim of town datestamp, Extremely Fine Gem, Plate 1 Late perforated stamps are rarely found in this choice condition, with 1985 P.F. certificate

525
2,500
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109
 
Sale 804, Lot 109, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IV (23). Position 7R1L, the recut state of Type I, absolutely perfect centering, showing the double transfer and complete design at top and nearly complete plumes at bottom, recut once at bottom, neatly cancelled by town datestamp, bright shade from a worn plate, Extremely Fine Gem, any example of Type IV perforated in this choice condition is rare--the existence of this desirable position, which produced the Type I imperforate (Scott 5) in its earlier pre-recut state, is truly extraordinary--with 1986 P.F. certificate; this stamp realized nearly $4,000 at auction in 1987, Scott Retail for ordinary No. 23 recut once at bottom

600
4,500
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110
c
Sale 804, Lot 110, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IV (23). Positions 58-60R1L, horizontal strip of three, left stamp (Pos. 58R) shows cracked plate, each recut at top and bottom, exceptionally well-centered, tied by "New-York Oct. 13" circular datestamps on buff cover to Milton Mass., Extremely Fine Gem strip and clean fresh cover, the deceptively ordinary appearance of a 1c strip of three on cover conceals the extreme rarity of a Type IV perforated multiple of this superb quality--a fact not lost on previous owners Brown, Emerson, Moody and Grunin

E. 2,500-3,500
4,250
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111
bl
Sale 804, Lot 111, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. IV (23). Positions 12-13/21-23L1L, block of five, four stamps recut at top and bottom, Pos. 21L recut once at top and twice at bottom, each stamp perfectly centered, dark shade and fine impression, four neat strikes of "Philadelphia Pa. Sep. 28" (1857) circular datestamp, completely sound with perforations fully intact

EXTREMELY FINE GEM CONDITION. THE LARGEST RECORDED BLOCK OF THE 1-CENT TYPE IV PERFORATED STAMP. TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE, NO UNUSED BLOCK EXISTS AND ONLY THREE OR FOUR USED BLOCKS ARE KNOWN. AN OUTSTANDING MULTIPLE, NOTEWORTHY FOR ITS SUPERB QUALITY AS WELL AS ITS EXTREME RARITY.

An article by Mortimer L. Neinken in the Collectors Club Philatelist (Vol. 49, No. 4, p. 210), illustrates this block and states: "Unused blocks of the perforated Type IV are unknown... Extensive investigation has revealed the existence of only two used blocks [one ex Chase]... the beautiful block of five... could well be called superb for an item of such great rarity..." The Neinken book (pp. 135-136) repeats much of this information and describes a third block, on cover, that was reported at publication time. These three used blocks are all that we record.

The rarity of Type IV perforated stamps is explained by the fact that Plate 1 Late (containing the 199 recut positions) was not used to print stamps in mid-1857 when perforations were introduced. Some left-over imperforate Plate 1L sheets were fed through the perforator, as were sheets from Plates 2 and 4, and these stamps were issued beginning in July 1857. The latter two plates remained in production, but Plate 1L produced no additional stamps. Thus, only a small number of Type IV stamps were ever issued with perforations.

Ex Bechtel and offered at public auction possibly for the first time since 1969. With 1969 P.F. certificate. Scott Retail based on the sale of a block of four in inferior condition

11,500
26,000
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112
 
Sale 804, Lot 112, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. V (24). Plate 5, choice centering, rich color and blue town datestamp, Extremely Fine Gem, with 1986 P.F. certificate

41
250
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113
c
Sale 804, Lot 113, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. V (24). Positions 60/70/80R9, vertical strip of three with wide right margin capturing "Toppan, Carpenterar & Co. BANK NOTE EN(GRAVERS)" imprint, spelling error of Carpenter name due to traces of "Casilear" after removal, well-centered, tied by "Wooster Ohio" circular datestamps on buff cover to Dalton O., Extremely Fine, choice and very scarce imprint multiple

E. 500-750
900
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114
c
Sale 804, Lot 114, One-Cent 1857-60 Issue1c Blue, Ty. V (24). Positions 31/41L8, vertical pair with wide left margin capturing "Toppan, Carpenter & Co. BANK NOTE" imprint of Plate 8, bright shade, tied by "New Orleans La. Aug. 4, 1860" circular datestamp on blue folded printed circular to Bremen, Germany, red "PAID ALL" straightline handstamp, Extremely Fine, imprint multiples from Plate 8 are extremely scarce and very rare on cover

E. 750-1,000
1,350
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