Contact Siegel
6 West 48th Street
9th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Contact by phone:
New York: (212) 753-6421
Dallas: (214) 754-5991

Sale 801 — Confederate States

Sale Date — Tuesday, 9 June, 1998

Category — Autographs and Ephemera

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
255
c
Sale Number 801, Lot Number 255, Autographs and EphemeraRobert E. Lee, Robert E. LeeRobert E. Lee. Confederate General and Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, autograph field-letter endorsement "R. E. Lee Genl" on brown cover to "Genl Gordon, Comdg."

FRESH AND VERY FINE. A REMARKABLY CHOICE ROBERT E. LEE FIELD COVER.

The address is also in Lee's hand

E. 10,000-12,000
8,500
256
 
Sale Number 801, Lot Number 256, Autographs and EphemeraRobert E. Lee, Robert E. LeeRobert E. Lee. Signature "R E Lee" on 1 x 2-3/4 in. clipped portion of printed form, light vertical fold, Very Fine

E. 1,000-1,500
1,275
Back to Top
257
 
[James J. Archer]. "General Order No. 6", 2pp, in ms., beginning "For the information of all concerned the following will be the form for brigade review" and signed "By Command of Brig. Genl. Archer O.H. Thomas AAA Genl." Archer was captured at Gettysburg and held for more than a year. He died Oct. 24, 1864; sheet with age spots and toning but a scarce piece from the 5th Texas

E. 100-150
60
Back to Top
258
 
[Jefferson Davis]. North Carolina Electoral Ticket for Davis and Stephens with district listings and Roger A. Pryor for Congress, black on gray with fancy border, nail hole at center and faint pen stroke, Fine

E. 400-500
200
Back to Top
259
 
Jubal Early. ANS, 1p, datelined "Head 2nd V D Feb 23, 1865." On irregular piece of paper, it reads in full: "Mr. John B. Davis has permission to send twelve (12) bushels of corn to Richmond for the use of Mr. George D. Fisher. J A Early M Genl." There is also a later ms. note by J.P. Hawkins (see lot 269) on back; some wear and fading, scarce late war-dated signature

E. 500-750
500
Back to Top
260
c
Chas. H. Olmstead. Signed homemade cover "Mailed by Chas H. Olmstead Col. 1st Vol. Reg. Ga." in his hand and addressed to his wife in Milledgeville Ga., partial strike of "Due 10" hs, some toning, still Very Fine, Charles H. Olmstead commanded Fort Pulaski, which guarded Charleston Harbor, and which was taken by the Union on April 11, 1862. He was exchanged on Nov. 10, 1862, and then commanded the Georgia 1st Regt. Volunteer Infantry, often called Olmstead's Regiment

E. 50-75
75
Back to Top
261
c
Alexander Stephens. Five items: incl. two free franks, one dated May 8, 1856 from Washington D.C., and one from Crawfordville without year date, third item is a presentation leaf ALS for volume presented to General Albert C. Erlington in 1871, last item is cover bearing 5c Blue, Stone 3 (4b) cancelled by small ms. "X", matching "White Plains Geo. Sept. 25" ms. pmk. on cover sent by Linton Stephens to Alexander Stephens with 1862 receipt docketing on back (missing backflap), last is post-war cover addressed to Alexander Stephens at Crawfordville, few small faults, a Fine-Very Fine and interesting group

E. 300-400
0
Back to Top
262
 
Confederate Bonds, Arkansas. Eleven bonds ranging in value from $5.00-$20.00, Nos. 61B, 61E, 61F, 61J1, 61J2 (2), 61J2-1, 61J3, 61K1, 61K2 (2), all except three are intact, few faults, most appear Fine, an interesting group

E. 750-1,000
500
Back to Top
263
 
Confederate Bond, Mississippi. Single bond, No. 65A in the amount of $500.00 and with Paterson imprint at bottom left, creased and some toning, still Fine and very rare

E. 500-750
450
Back to Top
264
 
Confederate Bonds, North Carolina. Three oversize bonds, $500 and two $1,000 denomination, Nos. 62E, 62I and 62L, each with Paterson imprint and with all coupons intact, few folds and faults, an interesting group

E. 500-750
525
Back to Top
265
 
Confederate Bonds, South Carolina. Two, one for $100 and one unused, coupons redeemed from the $100 bond, the blank bond for seven percent interest, the first with some toning and margins in, second is lightly folded and Very Fine

E. 400-500
0
Back to Top
265A
 
$500.00 Bond, Act of February 28, 1861, Issued at Montgomery Ala. (Criswell 3). No. 2, dated Montgomery May 1, 1861, signed Alexander B. Clitherall, bondholder's line left blank, ample margins all around, folds (six vertical and one horizontal), small tear at left and couple tiny tears at top, fresh and Very Fine, rare Montgomery bond - only 190 issued there - 1992 Criswell value $3,800.00

E. 3,000-4,000
2,000
Back to Top
265B
 
$40.00 "Fifteen Million Loan" Certificate, February 28, 1861 (Criswell 140). No. 690, Dunn & Co. and Evans & Cogswell imprints, margins slightly into frameline at top right and bottom left, few faint folds, Fine and noted as "very rare" in Criswell

E. 400-500
200
Back to Top
265C
 
Confederate States Bonds. Criswell 5 (two), 5A (three), 6A, 8, 62I, 104, 144A, some coupons clipped, folds and splits, a couple with corners damaged or toning, scarce group

E. 400-500
550
Back to Top
266
 
Confederate Stationery. Small white flag with ten gold stars within crossed red strips, surrounded by circle of text: "Confederate States of America Aide To! Dieu Taidera" as letterhead for sheet of blue-lined paper with undated poem in pencil, small faults, Fine appearance, very rare (similar to Dietz F10-18)

E. 150-200
75
Back to Top
267
 
Treasury Notes. Ten items, mostly from Ga. or N.C. in denominations from 10c-$20, some wear and faults, otherwise Fine

E. 100-150
65
Back to Top
268
c
The Death of Colonel Ellsworth. Four-page letter headed "NW Wall St. New York May 24 1861, from a L.W. Gilbert to a friend in Maine: "I can give you no news that you do not get from the newspapers, unless it may be about my own affairs. I fear that the fight between the north & the south has commenced today. Col. Ellsworth with his Fire Zouaves went early this morning to Alexandria to take possession of Custom House &c. when he was shot dead by a Secessionists who in turn was killed on the spot. What the effect of this will be I cannot even guess; but as Co. E. was a pet with Lincoln I fear that terrible results may follow." He also notes, "I had hoped that we could avoid having a conflict until Congress meets in July, & that there some effort would be made to put a stop to all this terrible work. It may be so still; but I fear we must have some fighting." The balance of the letter discusses Gilbert's money woes, and most likely reflects Wall Street nervousness in general, with his finances tied up in southern securities ("I might about as well be propertyless so far as raising money is concerned.") Includes original transmittal envelope with 3c Dull Red (26) tied by bold "New-York May 24" cds and grid duplex, Fine, a rare and very early account of Col. Ellsworth's murder, dated the day of his death - most likely the earliest such report from New York City

E. 1,000-1,500
800
Back to Top
269
 
The 1862 Diaries of J.P. Hawkins. Two volumes, approx. 260 pages, Jan. 1-July 25, 1862, all in bold pencil. The following are excerpts from Hawkins diaries as a employee of the Southern Express Co. and mail agent on the Virginia Central R.R.,: "News of fight at Somerset, Ky. Genl. Zollicoffer killed. Our men defeated...News of McCulloughs death & Genl. McIntosh in Arkansas. Genl. Price wounded. Our forces evaculate Winchester...Meet Ransons Regt. NC Cavalry at Louisa...Jeff Davis & Genl. Johnson at Gordonsville waiting for Culpeper train...News of the Virginia has taken 3 Brigs & 1 Schooner near Fort Monroe...Large amount of guns rifles & smooth bore cannon around depot...The French Consul arrives in Richmond from Washington...News of N Orleans being taken...The spy Webster hung at Camp Lee on the 29th April. 5000 men sick in the Richd hospitals about 25 dying every day. the Conscription Act taking up everybody between 18 & 35 hardly any exempt...Our pickets capture 9 & kill 9 of the Monitor's crew at City Point...News received of Col. Turner Ashby's death...Jackson drives Shields back 8 miles - captures 4 of the most perfect cannon ever made...Fremont sends Flag of Truce to `Genl. Jackson Commander CS troops at or near Port Republic' requesting to be allowed to move his wounded & sick from Harrisonburg. Jackson refuses and directs his reply to `Genl. Fremont Commander of troops late of Harrisonburg Va...The 44th and 58th Va. Regiments ran like sheep at the battle near Port Republic - Had to be charged by our men with bayonets to keep them in the ranks...People very much bothered as to Jackson's movements various conflictions as to where he is going Jack himself passes on down the road during the evening...See General Jackson at Gordonsville for the first time. A very plain looking man, not at all self-conceited, but tolerable, tall and slim, chin beard and slightly bronzed by exposure, little bow legged, a light military cap on and very plain uniform of rusty grey...Genl. Lee given orders for quarters for 10000 prisoners...Jackson been made a full general everything all OK in the Valley...The Arkansas battering ram cleaned Fed gun boats at Vicksburg...The `Merrimac' blown up...things look dark for our young Confeeracy worse now than ever. May God help us now...A negro woman hung in Richmond May 23 for murder...Genl. Hatton of Tennessee killed...News received of Col. Turner Ashby's death...Jackson drives Genl. Shields back & Ewell drives Fremont back...we meet a wounded train at Waynesboro great many stragglers there from Jackson's Army wounded laying all around on platform awful to look upon." etc. Some wear to be expected though the second volume is nearly immaculate. Accompanied by a post-war CDV of Hawkins

E. 4,000-5,000
2,000
Back to Top
270
 
The 1863 Diary of J.P. Hawkins. One volume, 81pp, entries dated Mar. 17-Apr. 6th, recording his experiences as Southern Express Co. courier delivering 8 million dollars for the Confederate Government to a Maj. C.E. Carr in Jackson, Miss. A few excerpts: "Nearly fall off of wagon going up to Southern Depot. Cold - snow blowing hard - no train out all hauling troops - back to Petersburg office truck our money in...Snow about 10 inches deep & still snowing awful hard - load our money in Box Express car - & leave P-Burg about 10 OC...Get out at every station & watch car until we leave ride in there some - but the corpses smell very bad...I go down to Exp. Off. & try and warm. Express off a very small wood building - crowded so that you cannot turn around & so dark you cannot see. Seem to have plenty Exps men here - about one dozen laying around...we are 10 hrs running the 96m road all mashed down in awful condition...one heavy run off - where the train run into a river & cars engine & all went down drowning & killing 60 persons - only about 40 found great many buried side of the road about 2 feet of the tender sticking above the water & quicksand have not found the engine yet that is broke loose & sunk beyond reach - afraid of this road & very glad when we get to our journeys end." etc. In contrast to the breathless tone of the first two diaries, Hawkins in these entries gives the reader a rare day-by-day glimpse into the life of a traveler in the war-time south: "...beautiful view going out to Tensaw River Gulls & ducks in abundance 5 Iron clads & 2 Gun Boats lying in the harbour at anchor within sight pass the forts built on piles & splendid batteries." And in contrast to these frequently poetic descriptions, there are observations like this one: "Riots in Richmond last week - 3 or 400 a perfect mob - breaking open stores & taking what they want - one in P-burg also but quelled by city council with a promise of $150000 - it looks bad - god deliver us from them...The North jubilant over idea of starving us out."

E. 1,500-2,000
1,000
Back to Top
271
 
Leaving Richmond: An Express Agent's Account. 12pp, 7-1/2 x 9-1/2 in., datelined "Danville May 15th-65" from J.P. Hawkins, an employee of the Southern Express Co., acting as courier, to his mother. He writes (in part): "I arrived in Richmond the memorable Sunday of the Evacuation about 10 PM. Just getting back from Charlotte where I had been with a large sum of C.S. Govt. Coin. Found every thing in an awful excited condition burning valuable paper and money at all the different Departments...destroying all that they supposed would be of any service to U.S. Govt...I had resolved to go home by way of Lynchburg but in returing to Express Office was asked by Col. Bulwell if I would not take charge of the horses and two large wagons...left Richmd Sunday night 12-oc precisely having five (5) iron safes and a large lot of the books belonging to the office besides supplies for man & beast." etc. Hawkins then describes his journey to North Carolina, mentioning the news of Lee's surrender - amid descriptions of fording rivers, wagons stuck in mud, stragglers catching mules and riding them bareback, and endless reports of the enemy's proximity. He then reaches Greensboro, where he stays 14 days, "amidst the greatest scene of confusion & excitement I ever beheld. Johnsons army arrived there a few days after I did and lay around during the 10 days truce, or armistice between Sherman & himself. The last of the CS Gvt was also there a part of the time - including 'Jeff Davis', Benjamin, Breckenridge, Trenholm & cc nearly all the big men (`Jeff Davis' and I suppose the balance have since been captured in Georgia.) The CS Gvt had vast amounts of stores there - 114 Hhds Sugar alone Bacon by the thousand Corn and enough army grey cloth alone to furnish a suit for every man in the armies South nearly everything was carried off by the mob - consisting principally of these NC Woman (who beat everything I ever saw in the shape of Females) and cavalry, Citizens & Negroes besides that they cleaned out 24 trains loaded with stuff from Raleigh," etc.; sheets with some toning and small separations at folds, only the last being in three pieces, Fine, a unique and exciting account of the very last days of the war in the East. Accompanying this is a letter from Col. R.B. Bullock with Southern Express imprint authorizing Hawkins to take charge "of the wagon & teams", also a letter from Bullock with directions, and a post-war CDV of Hawkins (Lee Gallery, Richmond impt.)

E. 1,500-2,000
800
Back to Top
272
 
[Abraham Lincoln]. Albumen print, 3 x 3 in., with penciled title, "Abe Lincoln's Vault" at bottom, showing two uniformed guards at attention and two seated soldiers, reverse" with note in same hand, "J.R. Orvis/Photographer/for German 1868", mounted on 4-1/4 x 3-1/4 in. board, creased at center

E. 200-300
0
Back to Top
273
 
Muster Roll. 31 x 21 in., from Captain Henry Bowman, Co. C, 15th Reg. of the Mass. Volunteers, dated Oct. 31, 1862, listing the dead, wounded and missing at the Battle of Antietam: "Wounded in the action of Sept. 17th...Missing since the action of Sept. 17th/62...Prisoner of War since Sept. 17th/62...Killed in the action of Sept. 17th/62...died Sept. 28th of wounds rec'd Sept. 17th/62" etc., some paper loss at edges, still Fine, suitable for framing

E. 400-500
375
Back to Top
274
 
Report of Cruise of the Nashville. 16pp printed document beautifully bound in leather and hand-made paper (modern), contents dated March 10, 1862 from Beaufort N.C., contains the first-hand report from the commander of the Nashville on his blockade-running activities to escape the port, their trip to Bermuda and on to England, where during the voyage they captured and burned the Harvey Birch, laying in for repairs in England, an account of England's official activites regarding their neutrality, and the return voyage and running the blockade back into Beaufort, first page of document is Message of the President, next page is Letter of Secretary of Navy, then full account, a Very Fine and extremely rare document from the Confederate Archives, one of only three that are known

E. 750-1,000
850
Back to Top
275
 
Confederate Naval Documents. Two items, each is beautifully bound in colored paper and leather (modern), and are: 1) two-page printed House Bill dated April 8, 1863 regarding distribution of bounty granted as a reward for the officers and men serving aboard the Virginia, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Raleigh, Beaufort and Teazer for their gallantry and courage at the engagement at Hampton Roads; and 2) a seven-page Report from the Select Committee to investigate the management of the Navy Department, both exhibit slight signs of wear as are normal, both are Very Fine and interesting items

E. 400-500
0
Back to Top
276
 
Letter from New Orleans. Blue stationery with beautifully printed view of Henry Clay Statue in New Orleans, datelined April 13, 1864, written by a soldier from New York who writes "I am not sick of soldiering in the least, yet although I don't like the way the thing is managed it is a regular speculation all around if a man has plenty of influential friends and money it makes no difference if he is a natural born fool he can get any position he wishes for while a poor man be he ever so worthy can attain no higher position than high private or Corporal at the most...", some slight overall wear, folded, Very Fine and interesting letter

E. 100-150
130
Back to Top
277
 
"Richmond Va. March 29, 1865". Dateline on 3pp letter written four days before surrender of Richmond, fascinating contents from the beginning as letter starts out "As I have the opportunity of sending a letter through the lines, by underground R.R., I write again, although it has been but a day or two since I wrote to you by "Flag of Truce"...Richmond is a gay place, and except in the high price of everything, I can see little difference between it and other cities...now they find buckets necessary to carry the money required...the people [are] just as lively as if Grant's army was a hundred miles away...", other interesting contents as well, some wear incl. small piece out of first page, still a fascinating first-hand account of the mood in Richmond only days before it fell to the Union forces

E. 200-300
425
Back to Top
278
 
Slave Bill of Sale. Dated June 28, 1827 for slave named Henry sold for the sum of $401.00 to George E. Badger, toning, still Fine, Badger would later serve as Secretary of the Navy from 1840-41

E. 200-300
300
Back to Top
279
 
Slave Bill of Sale. Hand-written Bill of Sale, dated Jan. 14, 1846 and for the amount of $900 for two boys aged thirteen and ten, from Wilcox County Ala., some foxing, Fine

E. 100-150
160
Back to Top
280
c
Vermont Soldier's Letters. 1861-65, collection of 83 soldier's letters written by Roger Hovey of Worcester, neatly arranged in chronological order and notable for their content, starting before he was called to serve, including letters from training at Camp Holbrook, into Louisiana with descriptions of a secret club in New Orleans, few mini-diaries of events incl. one of march through Shenandoah Valley from 1864, the correspondence concludes with his discharge, much of the correspondence is more detailed than we can mention here, most with original covers, few faults to be expected, a Fine-Very Fine and interesting correspondence

E. 2,000-3,000
2,800
Back to Top
281
 
LITERATURE. Three hardbound books: first is 1929 edition of The Postal Service of the Confederate States of America by Dietz; second is Dietz Confederate States Catalogue 1959 edition; last is Civil War Prisons and their Covers by Antrim, few faults, all are valuable reference works

E. 200-300
105
Back to Top
282
 
LITERATURE, Walcott Patriotic Collection. Hardbound 1934 catalogue, with dedication inside front cover and signed by Robert Laurence (compiler of the catalogue), few little corner nicks, still Fine, valuable reference work

E. 50-75
70
Back to Top
283
 
LITERATURE, Navy-Related. Eight items, incl. 1) The Chase of the Rebel Steamer of War Oreto into the Bay of Mobile by the U.S. Steam Sloop Oneide, dated 1862; 2) First Cruise of the Montauk dated 1880 (modern leather binding); 3) Commandery of the District of Columbia's War Paper 9: Incidents of Blockade, 1861-65; 4) bound volume of Argument of District Atty. in Case of the Prize Steamer Peterhoff dated 1863; 5) 1862 Report of Operations on Tennessee River and at Bridgeport from Hqtrs, 1st Brigade, East Tenn.; 6) Report of the Bombardments of Forts Jackson and St. Philip and The Fall of New Orleans from Hqtrs Dept. No. 1, Jackson Miss.; 7) bound volume of Case of John Y. Beall, a spy and guerilla for the South, signed by an aide-de-camp; last is 1981 publication of U.S. Navy Officer Resignations & Dismissals on the Eve of the Civil War, some have faults, still a fascinating group for the historian or specialist

E. 500-750
325
Back to Top
Copyright 2020. All rights reserved by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. Information and images may be used with credit to Siegel Auction Galleries or siegelauctions.com subject to guidelines and restrictions.
Website Terms of Use and Privacy Policy