Contact Siegel
6 West 48th Street
9th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Contact by phone:
New York: (212) 753-6421
Dallas: (214) 754-5991

Sale 795 — Confederate States

Sale Date — Tuesday, 28 October, 1997

Category — Flag-of-Truce Mail

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
1442°
c
Sale Number 795, Lot Number 1442, Flag-of-Truce MailCivilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba - The Aichel Correspondence, Civilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba - The Aichel CorrespondenceCivilian Flag-of-Truce Cover from Cuba - The Aichel Correspondence. Two folded letters from a German immigrant, Oskar Aichel, to his wife at home in Anderson C.H., South Carolina

A REMARKABLE PAIR OF LETTERS. THE FIRST TELLS OF THE WRITER'S IMPENDING JOURNEY ON A BLOCKADE RUNNER, WHILE THE SECOND IS AN EXTREMELY RARE FLAG-OF-TRUCE USAGE FROM CUBA TO SOUTH CAROLINA VIA NEW YORK CITY, FORTRESS MONROE AND RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.

The first is datelined Wilmington N.C. Oct. 7, 1863, as Aichel is awaiting his departure on board the "Blockade Runner... Margaretha & Jessie" to be transported to Nassau and Havana, with 10c Green, Die B (12) tied by "Wilmington N.C." circular datestamp.

The second, headed "Fourth letter", is datelined "Habana, 22 Decemb. 1863" and written in English for the purpose of censoring. Aichel mentions he has been in Havana for 1-1/2 months, describes the difficulty of finding work at reasonable wages and characterizes locals as "those mis-trusting vicious creoles." He closes by wishing his family a Merry Christmas. This letter is endorsed "By Flag of Truce" and was enclosed in an outer envelope (no longer present), which carried it by steamer to New York City and from there to the exchange point at Fortress Monroe in Virginia. The enclosed letter was censored and marked "Examined J. Cassels" (John Cassels, Captain and Provost Marshal), then sent by flag-of-truce boat to Richmond, where 10c Greenish Blue, Die B (12), large margins, was tied by "Richmond Va. Jan. 18" (1864) circular datestamp.

Both are in Very Fine condition. Letters originating outside the continental United States and carried into the Confederacy under the flag of truce are extremely rare - far rarer, in fact, than blockade-run covers into Confederate ports. Two similiar covers from the Aichel correspondence - one with a faulty stamp, the other stampless - were offered in our sale of the Kohn collection (Sale 382).

E. 7,500-10,000
12,000
1443°
c
Sale Number 795, Lot Number 1443, Flag-of-Truce MailLiberty Va. Mar. 15 (1865), Liberty Va. Mar. 15 (1865)Liberty Va. Mar. 15 (1865). Clearly struck cds ties 10c Blue, Die A (11), full to large margins, used with 3c Rose (65), corner slightly clipped, tied by quartered cork with matching "Old Point COmfort Va. Mar. 24" double-circle ds on brown homemade cover to Knoxville Tenn. (under Federal occupation), endorsed "Per Flag of Truce via Fortress Monroe", slight toning - an intriguing usage - the addressee (David A. Deadrick) had two sons in the Confederate army; one (Oakley) was captured in 1863 and held prisoner until the war's end; the other (Inslee), was probably the sender of this flag-of-truce letter, posted at Liberty Va. and exchanged at Fort Monroe

E. 1,500-2,000
1,000
Back to Top
1444°
c
10c Rose (5). Full to large margins, small nick at top right just into design, tied by bold "Salisbury N.C. Jul. 17, 1861 [sic]" cds (with usual year-date error) on Civilian Flag-of-Truce cover from Myer Myers to Emanuel Hart in New York City, neat "DUE 3" hs and "Ex 9" in ms., with original enclosure datelined at Salisbury and which reads in part "I have been very much disappointed at my dear wife and children not having arrived on this as there has been several arrivals of Ladies by Flags of Truce in the last three weeks", very slight edgewear, lightened gum stains

FINE AND VERY RARE - POSSIBLY UNIQUE - CIVILIAN FLAG-OF-TRUCE COVER WITH THE 10-CENT ROSE LITHOGRAPH.

It is not clear to us how this flag-of-truce cover was handled. The regulations required the use of two envelopes for flag-of-truce mail. Ordinarily, on a South-to-North letter, the outer envelope would bear Confederate postage and an appropriately worded "Flag of Truce" address. At the exchange point the inner envelope bearing U.S. postage would be removed and put into the Federal mails. In this instance, it appears that the envelope bearing Confederate postage (the 10c Rose) was examined by the Confederate censor (ms. "Exd") and placed into the mails, receiving a Federal "Due 3" handstamp. While the regulations were often breached by placing Confederate and U.S. stamps on one envelope, this usage - without any Federal postmark other than the "Due 3" - is enigmatic and obviously extremely rare, if not unique. Illustrated in Antrim book, p. 195.

E. 5,000-7,500
2,400
Back to Top
Copyright 2021. All rights reserved by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. Information and images may be used with credit to Siegel Auction Galleries or siegelauctions.com subject to guidelines and restrictions.
Website Terms of Use and Privacy Policy