Sale 779 — Civil War Postal History and Autographs

Sale Date — Wednesday, 10 July, 1996

Category — Confederate Notables

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
216°
c
Sale 779, Lot 216, Confederate NotablesJoseph R. Anderson. Signature, with rank on orange cover to his wife in Richmond: "From J.R. Anderson/Brig. Genl./C.S.A." and addressed in his hand, "Mrs. J.R. Anderson" - giving us a second signature, ms. "Due 5" at R., clear "Wilmington N.C. Sep. 30" cds with integral "5 Paid" deleted in ms., penciled "1861," edge wear and corner nick at B.L., Fine, desirable example of a field cover, mailed shortly after Anderson was comissioned brigadier general

E. 500-600
675
217°
 
Robert Houston Anderson. Confederate General, signature, with rank, on back of a Alabama soldier's letter, who has requested a transfer, two days before Lee's surrender: "I have the honor to ask among you...for a Transfer to Capt -'s Co. K 8th Confederate Regt...Not that I am displeased with my present officers but for the following reasons...I have a Brothr-in-Law belonging to the Company & Regt. to which I ask to be transferred..." etc. On the verso, various lower officers hav endorsed the proposal and Anderson has signed his name to an endorsement, "Approved and respectfully forwarded." Fine, a rare late request

E. 500-600
450
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218°
 
Simon B. Buckner. Signature as Governor, on Justice of the Peace document, with seal, dated 1889, fresh, Fine

E. 200-250
200
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219
c
Sale 779, Lot 219, Confederate NotablesHowell Cobb. Three pieces, includes 3c Red Star Die entire (U26) addressed to Cobb as "Prsdt. Southern Congress Montgomery, Ala." with "Augusta Ga. Feb. 12" cds, Lincoln's birthday and exactly one year before Cobb was appointed brigadier general, accompanied by a second cover, same date, from Rome, Ga., with same address, also a free frank on 1856 cover from Washington, Fine lot, covers addressed to Cobb in this capacity are rare - among the large number of Cobb covers in the Underwood collection, these were the only examples

E. 300-400
250
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220
 
William Robert Cobb. C.S.A. House of Rep. but expelled before serving when his loyalty was questioned; killed by the accidental discharge of his own revolver, Nov. 1864. ALS ("Cobb Ala.", one page, dated Dec. 23, 1858, from the House of Representatives, with interesting P.S.: "A delegation of the Delaware Indians has been invited here by the Comm. of Ind. Affairs and is expected if they should trade their lands you shall be advised." Fine

E. 75-100
85
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221°
 
Sale 779, Lot 221, Confederate NotablesJefferson Davis. LS, 1 page (7-7/8 x 9-3/4 in.), dated Aug. 24, 1854, as Secretary of War to R.W. Clelland, Secretary of the Interior, returning the land deed confirming site of Jefferson Barracks, noting, "The deed appears to be sufficinet for the full protection of the interest of the Department,"; file notes and docketing on back by Clelland, Fine

E. 1,500-2,000
1,500
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222°
 
Sale 779, Lot 222, Confederate NotablesHenry Heth. ANS, 1 page, being an undated field dispatch (1862 campaign), 6-3/4 x 4-1/8 in., to Maj. Bradford on Genl. McCowen's staff: "the enemies force at Bridgeport and Stevenson is daily increasing. Genl. Buell arrived last night at Battle Creek hastily for the purpose of resistence. H. Heth Genl. Comg.", stain at top left, slightly affecting text but far from signature, still Fine, very scarce

E. 1,000-1,500
1,050
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223
 
Henry Heth. Signature ("H. Heth") as Major General on part-printed "Certificate Recommending Extension of Furlough" dated Mar. 7, 1865, also includes ANS of William S. Walker as Brig. Genl., signature of Brig. Genl. Joseph R. Davis, and final note, "Approved By order of Gen. Lee C.S. Venable", the Davis signature is defective (some paper loss at fold) and Heth signature is light, but still a desirable piece, recently discovered

E. 400-500
1,500
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224°
 
George Washington Custis Lee. Signature as Trustee on 1873 Washington & Lee University diploma, also signed by John Echols and William T. Poague, among others, large red seal, fold passing between "G." & "W." of Lee's signature, Fine

E. 500-600
0
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225°
 
Sale 779, Lot 225, Confederate NotablesRobert E. Lee. Large bold signature on card (cut to octagon shape), Fine example

E. 3,000-3,500
0
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226
 
Francis R. Lubbock. Confederate Governor of Texas. DS ("F.R. Lubbock"), dated Oct. 3, 1862, certifying the election of W.H. Andrews as District Attorney, with fancy Executive Dept. heading, Fine, bold signature

E. 150-200
120
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227
 
John L. Peyton. Agent for North Carolina in Europe. He was on the Nashville when she captured the Harvey Birch. ALS, 3pp, dated Oct. 1873, to a friend in Va., Fine

E. 75-100
35
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228
 
Sale 779, Lot 228, Confederate NotablesJohn H. Reagan. Postmaster General of the Confederacy, bold signature on 1862 postmaster appointment (14 x 8-1/2 in.) for Robert A. Smith at Berry's Mills, Ga., accompanied by small printed slip signed by B.N. Clements, "I have the pleasure, herewith, to forward your commission," blind embossed seal at left, bright and Very Fine, remarkably choice example

E. 750-1,000
575
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229
c
Alexander Stephens. Four covers, includes free frank (1844) from Newnan Ga.; handstamped free frank on Cong. Record cover (no date); cover with uncanceled 3c Rose (65) addressed to Stephens at Fort Warren as post-war prisoner; hand-carried Stephen Douglas campaign cover to Stephens at Savannah with his comment on back "Toombs speech about Douglas etc. I might quote." Some faults, though P.O.W. cover is immaculate and Very Fine, very interesting lot

E. 200-250
350
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230°
 
Sale 779, Lot 230, Confederate NotablesThe Album of J.E.B. Stuart. 8vo (6-1/2 x 7-1/2 in.). Published by J.C. Riker, printed title page "ALBUM" with engraving by A.L. Dick and nine illustrations, hand-colored or black & white (including two with embellishments in pen and ink by Stuart himself), original brownish black boards, leather spine with design of woman, edges gilt; covers with edge wear and some loss to spine at top, pages showing scorch marks at bottom to varying degrees (see preface)

THE GENERAL'S PRIVATE ALBUM, CONTAINING 34 ORIGINAL POEMS WRITTEN IN HIS YOUTH.

All in Stuart's hand (32 signed "J.E.B.", one in full, one unsigned), with a wonderful preface, "This Album" datelined "Camp Stuart Texas Feby. 17th 1855" and which reads (in full): "This album is the sacred repository of a few contributions original and selected by some of my college companions while a student at Emory & Henry College Virginia, as pledges of their esteem when the owner left its halls to enter the Military Academy at West Point N.Y. in 1850. Since that time it has not been used exclusively as an album but as sketch book, and a place for jotting down some of the offspring of his own pen suggested by different circumstances and occasions, and also the recepticle of a few selections, suiting his fancy. As such it is a book private in its character and personal in its object. As it has followed me wherever I have gone since 1850, my companion in Scouts on the Northwestern frontier of Texas, in one of which it narrowly escaped being burnt, as the valise in which I kept it and all my clothes were consumed by the Prairie's catching on fire. I have deemed it proper to write this preface in order that should the book ever fall in others' hands, its ownership might be known and its character not misunderstood. J.E.B. Stuart Lieut. R.M.R." Stuart's poems are typical of a college-educated young man - effusive, melancholy, and filled with the usual archaic diction, but his occasional use of military imagery and the numerous references to the women in his life make these something more than of just passing interest to today's readers. Titles include "A Prayer," "To -" (An acrostic which spells out the name of Mary Custis Lee), "The Mesmeriser" ("Respectfully dedicated to Miss Minnie B. of West Point"), "Lines in Answer to a Valentine supposed to be written by Miss Agnes L.", "The Advent of Furlough," "Lines Written on Leaving the States for Texas," "To Miss Mary Joyner Kerr of N. Carolina," "The Dream of Youth (To his Sister Victoria)," "To Miss Emily of West Point," "Lines sent to a Lady with a box of prunes," "Lines Respectfully dedicated to Miss XXXX" - A Tale of Romance"), "To Mary," "Lines For a Lady's Album in St. Louis," "To Bettie" [see next lot], "Lines Respectfully inscribed to the Misses Crockett of Bowling Green Virginia," "To the One I Love," etc. There is also an 8-page poem, "West Point," dedicated to Mary Custis Lee, some prose and an interesting note, written in minute script over a brownish stain: "My Blood Mar. 8, 1855." In addition there are more than twenty pages of entries by friends and relatives, including a dedication in verse by Jno. S. Cocke ("This volume is a consecrated thing"), "To Jim on leaving College," "To my friend J.E.B. Stuart," "To Beaut," etc. Approximately 87 pages, each poem is dated, often with the place of composition noted: West Point, Steamer Trabue on Mississippi, Camp Seclusion, Camp Stuart, Camp on Jolly River Texas, etc. Virtually unknown to historians and the collecting community, this unique book is offered for the first time at public auction

E. 40,000-60,000
70,000
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231
c
Sale 779, Lot 231, Confederate NotablesJ.E.B. Stuart. Signature ("Stuart") as part of box charge instructions, on undated white envelope to his cousin Bettie P. Hairston at Martinsville, Va., partly struck West Point N.Y. cds with integral "3" rate and matching "PAID" hs, address panel entirely in his hand, sealed cover tear affecting signature, Fine appearance, accompanied by a second envelope without his signature but also addressed entirely in his hand and with matching postmarks. Very rare and uncharacteristic form of Stuart's signature, offered for the first time

E. 750-1,000
1,350
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232
c
Sale 779, Lot 232, Confederate NotablesJ.E.B. Stuart. Tiny signature ("Stuart") as part of box charge instructions, on cover to his cousin Bettie P. Hairston at MaGee's Bridge, Miss., address panel entirely in his hand, clear "West Point N.Y. 26 Oct. 3" cds and matching "PAID", cover with stain at T.L. corner and opening tear, both far from signature and address, Fine and rare. Ms. Hairston was also the subject of one of Stuart's poems, "To Bettie" - a three page effort written in the hospital at West Point, Dec. 23, 1853, with the refrain, "To Bettie far away," (see lot )

E. 600-800
1,300
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233
 
[J.E.B. Stuart]. Important folded letter with 5c Blue, Local (7) pair postmarked "Gordonsville Va. Aug. 20, 1862," from Captain Charles Blackford in camp at the foot of Clarks Mountain, Head Quarters of Valley District, to his wife. He writes (in part): "I am in great trouble this morning about Eugene & William about the former because of Williams report of his condition which he thinks exceedingly critical & about the latter because he left me this morning to go down the Fredbg. plank road in search of Genl. Stuart, we having no troops on that road or even pickets & Genl. Stuart having gone some five or six miles down there to the house of a friend to spend the night not dreaming of an enemy. I met Stuart about 12 o'clock today with his horse in a foam, having just escaped from the enemy losing his hat, haversack, & Chaswell Dabney was with him & shared the same fate coming off without bridle, saddle, or sword. They took to the woods so that as William went down the road he had, I fear, no one to warn him of the position of the enemy and may have fallen into their hands...As I write I can see Genl. Lee talking to Genl. Jackson which is a sight many people would like to see - I never saw Genl. Lee before. He is a very handsome man & has as fine a face as I have ever seen." etc. Other parts of the letter deal with Blackford's concerns over security ("I fear the Generals taking too many into their confidence") after being turned back at Culpepper C.H. by Union forces ("their foiling a scheme which I felt sure would succeed."), Very Fine, a rare account of J.E.B. Stuart in a less than dashing light

E. 1,000-1,500
3,250
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234
 
Zebulon Vance. Confederate Governor of North Carolina. ALS, 4pp (7-3/4 x 9-7/8 in.), dated Dec. 13, 1886. Writing on U.S. Senate stationery to a newspaper editor, he replies to General Sherman's statement regarding a letter written by Jefferson Davis to a southern senator, threatening the cocercion of any state that would attempt to leave the Confederacy. Vance writes (in part): "Every letter ever written to me, on a political topic by President Davis is to be found faithfully copied in the official letter-books of the Executive Dept. of North Carolina. Those letter-books were taken from me by Genl. Sherman's troops at the closing of the war and are now in possession of the War Department in this City. Aside from these letter books Genl. Sherman never saw any letter addressed to me by President Davis. Although I have not seen those books and read their contents in almost twenty years, I am quite sure that no such letter can be found them. I could not have forgotten such a letter had it been received by me. The suggestion therefore, that I am the person referred to in Genl. Shermans statement is entirely untrue...alleging that I was in bitter hostility, whilst Governor of North Carolina, to be administration of Mr. Davis, is based also upon a misrepresentation of the facts. It is well known by those acquainted with the history of those times, that my differences with Mr. Davis were purely in regard to matters of detail, and that I supported him in his efforts to maintain the confederacy with all the zeal that I could command and all the power of the State which I could bring to bear." Vance quotes from a letter Davis wrote him: "`I feel grateful to you for the cordial manner in which you have sustained every proposition connected with the public defense.'" He encloses a printed copy of this letter, and concludes: "I do not wish to pose as a martyr to the circumstances of those times or as one ready to turn upon his associates after defeat. I desire to ake my full share of responsibility for everything I did and said druing those unhappy times. Great as were the abilities, and high as were the courage and faithfulness of Mr. Davis, I have no disposition to load him with all the misfortunes of defeat." Signature originally cut out by collector and neatly reattached, Fine - a superb, passionately felt letter. Before his election as governor in 1863, Vance was a Col. of the 26th N.C., and saw fighting at New Bern and in the Seven Days' Battles

E. 1,000-1,500
0
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235°
 
Tandy Walker. Confederate commander of Choctaw Brigade & 2nd Div. DS, as witness, on back of part-printed 1855 indenture: "I Tandy Walker being duly sworn do depose and say that I am a Choctaw Indian; that I am well acquainted with the Choctaw, and English Languages," etc., also signed again on face, in addition to signature of James Spring as Commissioner of Deeds in Alabama, Fine

E. 200-250
260
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236°
 
Joseph Wheeler. ANS (4 x 5-7/8 in.), datelined "Hdqs Cav Corps Mch 4/65." Addressed to Maj. H.B. McClellan, it reads (in full): "The enemy have left their lines of works - all heard of as yet were one hundred men at the first works. Respy major Yrobsvt J. Wheeler Maj. Genl." Other side of this is a ANS from Genl. Wade Hampton to Wheeler, regarding Union forces in area and aiding Genl. W.W Allen; both field despatches in pencil with the Hampton ANS particularly light, ruled lines in pen across text - at this late date writing paper was clearly in short supply and ink was a luxury among soldiers; otherwise Fine, very scarce

E. 1,000-1,250
1,400
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237°
 
Joseph Wheeler. ALS, 1 page, dated Aug. 26, 1889 on his personal House of Representatives stationery, to Col. John Bachelder: "Your letter is received. I will be gratified to see the plan you propose adopted. I believe that if the lines of the Confederate troops are marked out the States to which those troops belonged would gladly go to the expense of erecting suitable monuments." Very Fine, the monument in question was probably one commemorating Gettysburg

E. 400-500
0
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238°
 
John H. Winder. ANS twice, in ms. and pencil, on back of Jan. 19, 1864 letter to Judah Benjamin as Secretary of State, applying for a passport to Europe, also with two ANSs of John Campbell, Asst. Sec. of War, light toning, Fine

E. 500-600
525
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