Contact Siegel
6 West 48th Street
9th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Contact by phone:
New York: (212) 753-6421
Dallas: (214) 754-5991

Sale 769 — The Honolulu Advertiser Collection

Sale Date — Tuesday, 7 November, 1995

Category — Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
2001°
c
"On Board the brig. Thaddeus, Dec. 15, 1819." Dateline on 1-1/2pp folded letter to Deacon Abner Goodale in Marlborough, Mass., from his daughter Lucy Goodale Thurston, wife of the Reverend Asa Thurston, both members of the Pioneer Company of missionaries, sent out by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions on Oct. 23, 1819. Fighting headwinds en route, their ship sighted the Mary 2 degrees south of the equator. The two ships hove to and this hastily written letter along with other mail was given to the Mary's captain. Mrs. Thurston writes (in full): "My dear, dear Father, Brothers & Sisters. A vessel is in sight bound as we suppose to beloved America. Forgive me that I have not prepared letters to send you ere this. My journal, my prayers, my waking & sleeping moments are witnesses for me, that you are not forgotten - that you are remembered with lively & increasing affection. O forget not Lucy entered on a life, replete with trails & privations. Yet grieve not on my account. Although I sometimes keenly feel a separation from friends, yet Heaven comforts me. I do not, I have never seen the moment when I regretted my determination to spend my days in heathen lands. Mr. Thurston is to me all I could wish - tender, kind, & sympathizing. My health has been better than I had even dared to anticipate. Feel not anxious on my account. The family are at present in pretty good health. Sisters Loomas [sic], & Holman have suffered much from seasickness - it is even now seldom they can sit at table. I was confined with it three days to my bed; but in a week was pretty much recovered from it. Mrs. Chamberlain for the first few weeks had a great trial with her babe. She supported it with much patience & fortitude. The child is now well, running about the deck. Mrs. Chamberlain requests that the information you receive respecting us, should be communicated to her friends at Hopkinton. We passed the line day before yesterday. The weather is not more oppressive than with you at midsummer; the sun being in the southern tropic. Much of the way we have had head winds of course slow progress. We are now 29 deg. W. Long. 2 deg. South Latitude. -My dear friends, remember me fervently & frequently before the throne of grace. Write to me, & engage my friends to do the same, you cannot conceive how much a line from any one with whom I have ever associated, would gladden my heart. Remember me very affectionately to all my dear friends how do their kindnesses cause my heart to swell with gratitude. Farewell, my much loved relatives, an affectionate farewell, Lucy G. Thurston. I am all in agitation, & know not what I have written. do excuse it." Address panel with faint red Boston cds, matching "SHIP" and ms. "8" rate, a similar letter written by another missionary, the Rev. Hiram Bingham, is in the archives of the Mission Children's Society in Honolulu

THE EARLIEST KNOWN MISSIONARY LETTER, WRITTEN 57 DAYS OUT OF BOSTON EN ROUTE TO HAWAII

Lettersheet with toning and two tears at top, otherwise Fine, very rare and of incalculable importance to a postal study of Hawaii. An entry in Lucy Thurston's journal (lot 2010) indicates this letter was published in The Concord Observer, a copy of which was in her hands when she wrote this mixed reaction in May 1821: "I perused it with a tear. In writing to friends I feel a satisfaction. But let not their partiality causes them to give my writings to the public. All important facts will be given them through the medium of the public journal. After being pleased in the situation which I now occupy, I dare not say Never let my writing be read in manuscript; but this I say, I shall forever feel unwilling to have any pass before the public, without their being first read & approved by the Pru. Com. - & then it cannot but be attended with a sacrifice of my own personal feelings."

E. 6,000-8,000
0
2002°
c
"On Board the Brig Thaddeus, Dec. 21, 1819. Lat. 18 deg. S. Long. 35 deg. W." Dateline on hand-carried three-page folded cover from Lucy Thurston to her father, Deacon Abner Goodale, in Marlborough, Mass. She writes (in part): "Forever separated from my much loved paternal home, & forever separated, to, from every former associate & dear friend, I do rejoice that there is a medium of intercourse, through which I may unfold my feelings to that dear parent, whose unparalleled kindnesses have crowned the morning of my days....Last week I wrote you a few hasty lines; here I will give you a more explicit account of myself, & those with whom I am connected. Soon after we put forth to sea, ere we lost of American shores, sickness obliged me to repair to my couch. To this I was confined for three successive days & nights. The rest of the family were in similar circumstances, so that we were alike incapable of personally sympathising with, or administering to each others want. Chests, Trunks, bundles, bags, &c. &c. were piled into our little room six ft. square, until no place was left on the floor for the sole of one's foot. Two thirds of the way they were built up considerable higher than the berth, & for a space they extended to the height of the room. With such narrow limits & such confined air, it might well have been compared to a dungeon....The third day the whole family were able to go up on deck. Could you have beheld the scene exhibited, while you pitied, you must have smiled. Beside a boat, & hogsheads, & barrels, & tubs, & cables & c. with which the deck was filled, here were to be seen a dog & cats, & hens, & ducks, & pigs, & forty three persons; while our whole family, with the exception of the natives, were all under the horrors of seasickness. Some thrown on their matresses, others seated in clusters, lounging one upon another, & here & there individuals, leaning on the railing, or supporting themselves by hanging upon a rope. When the hour for refreshment arrives, a pot of soup is brought & placed on deck. A circle gather around it, & seat themselves like a group of children. Those who retain their seats are not neglected. Look which way you will, you see them sipping broth or picking bones. In this rude manner we were obliged to eat for several days." etc. She also describes the daily routine of prayers, singing and meals (with Sunday including public services on deck and religious meetings in the cabin), the kindness and civility of captain and crew, etc. The letter ends with a Christmas Day postscript: "Brother Nathan, your quinces proved very acceptable. We ate them up raw. To several in sickness they were great comforts. They ever reminded me of an absent brother, & his unnumbered kindnesses. Dec. 25. was religiously observed as the anniversary of the birth of the Savior. In the evening brother Brigham preached in the cabin. A hymn was sung composed on the occasion by Mr. Conant, one of the officers."; some toning, small paper loss at edges, neither affecting address panel which is neat and Fine

E. 2,000-2,500
2,600
Back to Top
2003°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2003, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Hannaloorah, Woahoo, June 27, 1820, "Hannaloorah, Woahoo, June 27, 1820"Hannaloorah, Woahoo, June 27, 1820." Dateline on folded letter Mrs. Fanny Howell in Canandaigua, N.Y. from Sybil Bingham, a member of the Pioneer Company of missionaries to the Sandwich Islands, who arrived on the Thaddeus in April 1820, cover hand-carried to Massachusetts, entering the mails there. The contents are mostly complete, consisting of both sides of one 8 x 10 in. sheet and two large pieces of a 2nd sheet. Mrs. Bingham writes (in part): "Here upon heathen ground, seated in my straw thatched cottage, the waters of 18,000 miles rolling between us, I take up for a reperusal your affectionate, your precious farewell to me, received just at the eve of my departure from my much beloved country. I seem to hear the kind voice, and almost feel the affectionate grasp which, to me, so many times, said, you have a place within my doors and within my heart....By the Ship Mary, Capt. Smith, Boston, spoken on our passage Dec. 15th we made communications home. Since then we have made none, except by the whale ship, L'iagle, Capt. Starbuck, London, which has not yet left these seas. By the Mary, I sent several letters, but could not but regret that I had none prepared for you, and some others, to whom I felt in haste to write. There was no time for any thing after seeing her. She passed by at full sail, just giving her name and whither she was bound, and had there not been much dispatch on the part of our Capt. in setting off a boat, we should have grieved many days with letters on our hands. You can hardly think what animation that little occurrence excited." After describing the voyage as "pleasant & rapid" before experiencing severe gales, mountainous waves and her own failing health, they reach the Islands: "Our Divine Supporter carried us through, and on the morning of the 30th March, allowed the joyful sound, `land ho,' `Owhyhee: bold mountains in sight,' to cheer our hearts, and the sight to gladden our eyes. yes, cheered & gladdened we were. But, O, - my friend, the conflicting emotions which struggled in our bosoms - who can tell! Was it our beloved country? Did the spires of the temples of our God rise to view? Could anticipation glide over a few hours & bring to our arms the friends of our hearts, with their pleasant homes, their restoring cordials for sinking nature, their tender sympathies, kind caresses & cheering voices? Ah, no! Weak & exhausted with a long voyage, far from beloved country, far from the temples of our GOD, we gazed upon the dark land over which hung Sable clouds, fit emblems of its moral darkness, -we thought of its rude inhabitants, with no pleasant homes, no christian sympathies, no tender charities to bestow at their unusual vistants. - We thought too of the hour when, perhaps, solitary and alone, without condoling friends, one must commit the dear remains of a soothing wife, another of an affectionate husband, to this pagan dust, or from heathen barbarity be denied the last sad comfort....We approached the Island on the Northeast side, passed round to the west & anchored, the 4th of April, in Kirooah bay. It presented a varied appearance. In some parts, fertile plains, between the high mountain and the shore, running streams, groves of coconuts, bananas, &c were pleasant to the eyes. When again, ragged rocks, huge cliffs projecting into the sea or terminating in beds of lava which, in former times, had run down from their lofty summits, changed the scene, and almost struck terror in the beholder." etc. Address panel with red "Boston Ms. Mar. 22" (1821) cds and manuscript rate partly faded, though with no indication of ship fee (this may have been carried as a favor by a crew member)

THE EARLIEST KNOWN HAWAIIAN LETTER WITH POSTAL MARKINGS AND THE EARLIEST KNOWN MISSIONARY LETTER AFTER THIS PIONEER COMPANY'S ARRIVAL

Outer lettersheet and contents aged, small edge nicks and tiny splits, still one of the indispensible pieces of Hawaiian postal history. Ex Baker, Ishikawa, illustrated in Meyer-Harris (p. 6)

E. 15,000-20,000
21,000
Back to Top
2004°
 
"Kirooah, Owhyhee, August 31, 1820." Dateline on closely written four-page letter from Lucy Thurston to her sister, Mrs. Persis G. Parkhurst. Much of the letter is devoted to describing their daily routine and living quarters, first mentioning that "Mr. Thurston has of late been busily employed in making a piece of furniture which if less elegant, is to us no less valuable than would be an American settee. To this, with a light stain, he has added still another comfort; that of attaching arms & rockers to our chair. It is the only one we have; & to save ourselves the inconvenience of bringing up the long form to a round table & then supplying the deficiency by piling boxes one above another, out of the refuse of his materials, he has made some very comfortable seats to place round the table; - they bear a strong resemblance to American milking stools. Still another convenience I am about to be in possession of - it is a cocoanut shell joined to a wooden tube in a manner to form a pretty funnel. For supper & breakfast beside tea and coffee, our table is furnished with the simple, yet good and nourishing food, potatoes & milk. This is a luxury we have not enjoyed till a short time since." She includes a lengthy and appealing description of their house and some observations on the natives: "This people are a noble race of beings but they are now in a most degraded state. In a bathing place but a few rods from our door, we daily see them of all ages, & of both sexes, sporting in the water in a state of perfect nudity. With the exception of the lowest class of people, who are called to labour, they spend their whole time sleeping, eating, drinking, smoking & playing." etc. Also included is a 60-line hymn copied from her husband's journal, "Lines composed by one of the Mission family" which features such stanzas as "While doubling that Cape which is the dread of the seaman/The winds were propitious though sometimes were high/Yet they drove us the swifter to that distant haven/Where pagans engulfed in idolatry lie." etc. Without outer lettersheet, ms. "Received May 1821" in corner; some toning and small edge wear, still Fine, outstanding content

E. 2,000-2,500
3,750
Back to Top
2005°
c
"From the Sandwich Isles. Favored by Capt. Bennet, Volunteer." Manuscript endorsement on Oct. 16, 1820 folded letter from Lucy Goodale Thurston to her father, Deacon Abner Goodale in Marlborough, Mass., and containing "extracts from my journal," from August 27 to October 16, 1820, on each side of two 8 x 13-1/4 in. sheets. She writes (in part): "Aug. 28. Mr. T. & brother Loomis today visited the spot where the battle was fought three or four months before our arrival. It is several miles from this place. About fifty were killed. Stones were piled up over some of them, while the bones of others lay strewed upon the ground. Sept. 2. Our hearts were cheered by the return of the king, who had been absent more than a month. His arrival was announced by eleven guns, which were answered from the fort. He then came on shore, called at our door, & gave us a friendly salutation. I had the curious pleasure of joining noses with four of the queens. Good brother Thomas has had a trying time during his absence. The heat was intense, the vessel completely filled with natives, & their provisions very short. Sept. 21. A week since, while instructing the children, a native, intoxicated with liquor, came in. I soon found my situation perilous. After vigorous exertions, I was obliged to quit the house & door yard. Where shall I go? - Whither fly for safety? - Mr. T. was in his school at the king's. It was a quarter of a mile distant, & the way lined with men. They may offer indignities. But there is no alternative. Fear added wings to my speed & I was soon without the reach of the destroyer. He pursued me but a few steps, threw after me one or two clubs & went his way. I returned to the house with my heart filled with sorrow, & my flesh with trembling. The young prince now ran & told Thomas, who communicated the alarm to Mr. T. In fifteen minutes the house was filled. Mr. T. came followed by his whole school, & their numerous train of attendants. They found me bathed in tears. The queens were very sympathising; with moistened eyes they would tenderly embrace me, join noses & say `Nooenooe allohah,' that is, I love you much. In a short time after, the man returned. Formerly, his standing among this people was very high; he was worshipped as a god. At his presence the people all fell prostate. But now his conduct drew from Mr. T. a command to retreat from the door yard. This he refused; when with the assistance of a cane, Mr. T. quickly left him in the highway." etc. There are also comments about the king's drinking habits, visits from various ship captains including one with news that Indians from the Northwest coast "having heard that white people had come out to these islands, asked why they could not as well come & instruct them." Address leaf with red "Boston Ms. Jun. 1" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp, faint ms. "8" (6c from Boston to Marlborough + 2c ship captain's fee); aging, waterstaining, and small paper loss in journal - worthy of restoration, a rare and early Hawaiian manuscript giving a first-hand account of an early hostile missionary/native encounter

E. 3,000-4,000
3,000
Back to Top
2006°
c
"Woahoo Oct. 8th 1821." Folded letter from the Reverend Asa Thurston to his father-in-law, Abner Goodale, with ms. "Edgartown Ms. Mar. 13" postmark and "Ship 12-" rate (10c from Martha's Vineyard + 2c ship captain's fee) The three-page letter includes the announcement of the birth of their daughter Persis Thurston: "True we have had trials, great, long continued &, in many respects, peculiar - They have tried our patience, but we trust, they have not diminished our zeal or caused to forget or neglect the great work in which we are engaged. The Great Lord of missions has been with us to guide, strengthen & comfort us. In the midsts of all our trails & disappointments we have frequent occasions to sing of mercy. On the morning of the 28th Sept. we had reason to speak of special favor. Through the interposition of the supporting & delivering hand of our heavenly Father, Lucy was made the joyful mother of a fine little daughter, & we wept & prayed & rejoiced together over this new accession to our comforts & cares." He also mentions Lucy's poor health - the absence of a doctor and "those kinds of medicine which she used when in America beneath her father's roof." (By the next day he's able to report her improvement.) Address panel with ms. "By Capt. Allen Ship Moro Nantuck" in corner. The ship endorsement is confirmed by an entry in Lucy Thurston's journal (Lot 2010) for November 20, 1822. Even at this late date, they had no knowledge of the ship's safe arrival (..."it is now & then suggested that she may be lost.") Fine and desirable, believed to be the earliest letter in private hands written by a missionary himself

E. 4,000-5,000
0
Back to Top
2007°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2007, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"By the Ship Globe Capt. Gardner, Nantucket, "By the Ship Globe Capt. Gardner, Nantucket"By the Ship Globe Capt. Gardner, Nantucket." Endorsement on folded letter from Lucy Thurston to her father in Marlborough, ms. "Edgartown Ms. May 8" (1822) postmark and "Ship 27" for double rate as indicated by ms. "2 sheets" in Mrs. Thurston's hand. This contained a seven-page installment of Lucy's Thurston's journal. begun May 5, 1821 and ends, for the time being, on November 24. Headed "Journal Continued", she writes (in part): "16. Waked this morning by the canon's roar. The day has closed in which the memory of Tamahamaha is cherished, & his honors celebrated. Great preparations have been made, a royal feast provided, & an exhibition made of all the splendors of an uncultivated heathen court. In the midst of many thousands two tables were spread for the entertainment of the king, principal chiefs, capts. & officers in port, residents, & the mission family. At the king's request a clergyman was seated at each table....17. A visit this morning from the king & others of the royal family. He continues to view the house with the smile of satisfaction - wishes to have us send to America to have one brought out for him. He wants one three stories high; one story to devote to the worship of God, as bye & bye he intends to pray. It seems to us very desirable that this his request should be gratified by our American friends....31. This afternoon most of the family accepted an invitation to take tea on board Capt. Grime's vessel. The several Capts. in port were of the company. We made a pleasant visit & a sweet repast on good American food. It was crowned with a very rich cake made in America previous to their embarkation, more than two hundred days ago.... [June] 23. Thomas Hopoo very sick of the dysentery. Medicine seems to have no effect, & unless relief is immediately obtained, his case will be truly alarming. When I think of the departure of this devoted youth, my heart seems to say, stay, dear brother, stay, nor leave your countrymen to die in their sins, & sink in eternal death....18. Hitherto the labors of instruction have been divided. Br. & Sister L. Sister B. & myself have each had our scholars. They are now all entrusted to my care, about thirty in number. They make a pleasant school. One class of natives have their daily lessons in the Testament, which is interpreted to the school. Every ear is open, & every eye seems fixed; & while the sacred page is read, here & there is heard to drop from the lips, A-lo-ha, a-lo-ha e-no- That is, I love it, I love it very much. Precious to me have been the hours thus spent. I can reckon them among the happiest of my life....Aug. 14. An English vessel from Valparaizo bound to Calcutta arrived in port. Today Capt. Templeton called on us. Uninformed respecting the present state of the Islands, he knew not but he should be exposed to danger. How agreeably surprised, then, to find that here was society, & that here the beams of science had begun to dawn." etc. The final entry notes the enclosure of a lock of hair "cut from Persis's tender head.". Contradicting the example of the previous letter, the Edgartown postmaster rated this at 80 to 150 miles (12-1/2c); toning and some minor soiling, Fine and rare

E. 6,000-8,000
0
Back to Top
2008°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2008, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Oahu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 9, 1822, "Oahu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 9, 1822"Oahu, Sandwich Islands, Aug. 9, 1822." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Lucy Thurston to Abner Goodale in Marlborough, hastily written at 11 P.M. with her child sleeping by her side, and which begins: "Captain Decovin, ship America, bound to New York by the way of Canton, sails from this port tomorrow morning," etc. Contents refer to a visit from a member of the London Missionary Society "with nine christian Tahaitans," and some discussion of teaching: "The principal characters of the nation almost without exception, together with many of their people are now acquiring the first rudiments of their own language. It is now no time for inactivity. Every man, woman & child pertaining to this establishment has more or less to do with the business of instruction. Even our little boy, George, seven years of age, has his little school consisting of three great men, chiefs of an inferior order, to which he manfully & with much pleasure repairs twice a day." etc. Address panel with red "New-York Feb. 17" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp, ms. "20-1/2" (150 to 400 miles rate + 2c ship fee), Fine and rare

E. 2,000-2,500
1,800
Back to Top
2009°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2009, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Oahu (Waahoo) Sand. I. Oct. 8, 1822, "Oahu (Waahoo) Sand. I. Oct. 8, 1822"Oahu (Waahoo) Sand. I. Oct. 8, 1822." Four-page folded letter from Elisha Loomis, the missionary printer who arrived with the Pioneer Company of missionaries, to his brother Chester, the postmaster of Rushville, N.Y., acknowledging a letter from him, sent Dec. 3, 1821. He notes that the Reverend Bingham for the last two months has been preaching in the Hawaiian language; that a second edition of 2,000 copies "our Spelling Book" is being printed, and regrets not having the time to learn the language himself. The address panel is postmarked "Edgartown Ms. March 28" in ms. with an additional "Ship Free" in Loomis's hand and endorsed "Pr. Ship Spermo Capt. Bunker Nantucket", light soiling, Fine and desirable. In January 1822, the missionaries' first publication, a 16-page spelling and reading pamphlet, was printed in an editon of 500 copies. Over the next few years the printing office, with the help of native apprentices, issued a number of pamphlets, primers and scripture tracts, in addition to a translation of the Bible which was finally completed by May 10, 1839

E. 2,000-2,500
3,750
Back to Top
2010°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2010, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian LettersThe Hawaiian Journal of Lucy Goodale Thurston, The Hawaiian Journal of Lucy Goodale ThurstonThe Hawaiian Journal of Lucy Goodale Thurston. 60 pages, mostly 8 x 9-3/4 in., sent in four installments, with entries dated: January 1, 1820 to July 10, 1820 (15pp); October 17, 1820 to May 4, 1821 (15pp); November 26, 1821 to November 22, 1822 (14pp); and June 1823 to September 8, 1824 (16pp). The next to last installment includes the original outer lettersheet addressed to her father Abner Goodale, with "New-Bedford Ms. Apr. 16" cds in black with matching "SHIP"handstamp, ms. "89-1/2" rate with additional "1-3/4 oz" in the same hand, ms. "6 sheets" and endorsed "Ship Balaena, Capt. Gardner, Nantucket";

LUCY THURSTON SHARES WITH HER FAMILY A COPY OF HER HAWAIIAN JOURNAL

Datelined, "On Board the Brig Thaddeus, Jan. 1, [1820]," ("1819" is mistakenly written), Lucy addresses her father, brothers and sisters: "We experience so little variety on our passage I have hitherto neglected keeping a journal for the perusal of my friends. But standing on the threshold of a new year, reviewing the feelings and events of the past, a reviving sense of my obligations to my beloved relations urges me to the pen. Receive the following pages as a testimony of my affection & gratitude. I shall frequently & familiarly love to address my own dear family & tell them all the joys & sorrows, the hopes & fears, which alternately usurp the sway in my bosom."Insert here lengthy quotes

Pages with toning and small paper loss (virtually none affecting text), last installment with separations, outer sheet with top and side panel removed (not affecting text), cover mended with 19th century sewing thread - the same thread which was originally used to bind the journal's pages together into one "book" for the convenience of her many family members and friends. A unique and exciting pioneer document. For Lucy Thurston, the history she knew she was a part of was the history of her religion and faith, but each time she mailed her journals, it was to let others know there were worlds other than Massachusetts and New England, and that she was a witness. In these closely-written 60 pages, there are no dull entries. Lucy Goodale Thurston was a natural, and sometimes wonderful writer, with the good fortune of living in a distant place more original than she; probably the most important Hawaiian manuscript still in private hands

E. 30,000-40,000
35,000
Back to Top
2011°
c
Papers of Lucy Goodale Thurston and the Goodale Family. 16 pieces, 1800-1864, beginning with a 1800 folded letter from Wardsboro Vt. to Abner Goodale, "To be Left at Cuttings Tavern on the plain,"; 1813 state warrant to Abner as Collector of the town of Marlborough to collect $112.70; important letter from 21-year-old Lucy Goodale to the Reverend Sylvester F. Bucklin, telling of her awakening to the Christian faith after hearing his sermon a year ago: "At times am I perplexed with gloomy doubts and fears, lest I am not possessed with qualifications requisite for an acceptable performance of that important duty. This together with an affecting view of my own vileness, sinfulness, and unworthiness often leads me mentally to exclaim, who am I, that I should solicit a seat at Immanuel's table, that I should seek to become a participant of the supper of the Lord...I feel that I ought no longer to refrain from publicly avowing my faith in Christ, consecrating my all to God, and explicitly entering into solemn convenant engagements with the Most High"; moving letters from Lucy Thurston to her husband, on the death of their daughter Lucy (1841), which is accompanied by a frank seven-page account from Persis to her father, detailing her sister's illness ("I soon went into the sick chamber, and the change which had taken place in my dear sister during the night was very affecting to me. The powers of nature were fast failing & the hand of death was visible in every line of her pallid countenance." etc.) including some observations on the postmortem examination ("The lungs were of a very dark color, & being highly inflamed & filled with blood, appeared more like liver than lungs."); a Dec. 1841 letter from Lucy Thurston to her son Asa; an extract by Lucy of a 1842 letter she wrote upon her return ("The natives were overjoyed...Those who had lived in our family came & knelt around me & wept aloud," etc.); also a "REWARD OF MERIT" to Charles Goodale with appealing woodcut of young boy in boat, etc., Fine-Very Fine lot, ex Twigg-Smith

E. 600-800
1,050
Back to Top
2012°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2012, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Oahu, Sandwich Islands, March 20, 1823, "Oahu, Sandwich Islands, March 20, 1823"Oahu, Sandwich Islands, March 20, 1823." Dateline on three-page folded letter from Lucy Thurston to her family in Marlborough. She mentions the daily expectation of "a reinforcement of sixteen helpers," the increase of worshippers (1,000) and the willingness of the Hawaiians to receive more missionaries. She notes the death of a child, Levi Parsons, "after cherishing the lovely babe in our fond arms for sixteen days. It was a lovely plant, removed, we trust, to a more congenial soil. After a connection of more than three years, this was the first time we had been called to assume badges of mourning, or weep at the lamented grave of one of our number." address panel with red "Boston Ms. Aug. 22" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp with ms. "8" rate, endorsed "Capt. Chandler Brig Pearl, Boston" Fine. The 16 helpers refers to the Second Company of missionaries, sailing on the Thames, which arrived at Honolulu, April 27, 1823

E. 1,500-2,000
3,750
Back to Top
2013°
c
"Woahoo Oct. 22, 1825." Dateline on folded letter to Bristol, R.I., from John W. Spurr to his mainland representatives, General George De Wolfe and John Smith, writing of a shipment of sandalwood to Canton, weighing in at 800 piculs (approximately 50 tons, a picul being a Chinese measure of weight equivalent to 133.3 pounds), outer sheet with red "Boston Ms. Apr. 29" cds with matching "SHIP" handstamp and red ms. "12", endorsed "Favd by Capt. Blanchard", vertical file fold with some wear, Fine

E. 400-500
850
Back to Top
2014°
c
"Lahaina Oct. 14th 1830." Dateline on three-page folded letter from Miss Maria Ogden, a teacher who arrived on the Parthian in 1828 and at this time lived with Clarissa and William Richards. Writing to friends in Pequea, Pa., she notes that "the whale ships which touch here in the fall and spring afford us opportunities of receiving and sending letters to American friends." After describing at length the great changes wrought by the missionaries, including a former priest who had "offered sacrifices to false gods," and now taught "his former associates in idolatry that word which teaches them to forsake these lying vanities to serve the living God," she admits to "another side of the picture...we are often pained by the coldness, stupidity and indifference of many and we are sometimes called to shed the tear of anguish over the backsliding of some who have promised to be ornaments to the religion of Jesus." etc. Also noted are the marriages of Maria Patton and Delia Bishop; address panel with red "Boston Ms. Apr. 15" and matching "SHIP" handstamp, ms. "20-3/4" rate, some internal separations, Fine

E. 500-600
525
Back to Top
2015°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2015, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Waimea Aug. 13, 1832, "Waimea Aug. 13, 1832"Waimea Aug. 13, 1832." Dateline on closely written four-page folded letter from Betsey Lyons, wife of Reverend Lorenzo Lyons, to her sister in law in Colrain, Mass., a few weeks after their arrival. She describes the death of Kaahumanu, "one of the bright examples of christian piety...She died in faith, leaving the whole nation to lament her loss...The funeral was attended with all due solemnity. All the vessels in the harbor wore their colours half mast, and cannons were fired at intervals during the day. The forts also had theirs half mast and minute guns were fired while the procession was preceeding to the tomb and to the church. The coffin was splendid being covered with crimson velvet with brass ornaments and inscription. Over the bier were thrown feathered cloaks of different glaring hues. The chiefs were dressed in black and the missionaries attended in half mourning also a respectable company of foreigners with badges of mourning, she was desposited in the same tomb with the late king and queen, who died in England." There is also her description of a five-day ocean trip from Honolulu to Kailua: "The distance from Honolulu to our station is about 250 miles and to give you some idea of the pleasure we take during the sea voyages from one station to another you may fancy to your self a native brigg whose slacked & torn rigging, mended sails and dirty deck and cabin show that if it has not undergone the ravages of time it is worse for the care of these unused to the work of managing such a complicated piece of workmanship as a vessel. On its deck in the cabin and steerage you may see besides dogs, cats, goats, fowls and between 200 or 300 native with all their filth, smoking "poe" colabasaes [sic] on the after part of the deck we spread our matresses, and as seasickness comes on, here we lay ourselves down," etc.; address panel with red "New Bedford Mass. Mar. 16" cds, matching "SHIP" handstamp and ms. "20-3/4" rate, small tears, Fine, important and desirable content

E. 750-1,000
2,200
Back to Top
2016°
c
"Kailua, Island of Hawaii, April 16, 1832." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Lucy Goodale Thurston to Milliscent Goodale in Marlborough, Mass., and which was completed October 7, 1832. The contents are mostly devoted to a dramatic description of giving birth to her daughter Mary during a voyage between Maui and Hawaii on the brig Waverly. She writes (in part): "I thought of the precious names of home, physician, sister & the tears rushed into my eyes. But thinking them unreasonable, when every thing depended on my own exertions, I checked the impulse, & returned them to their sockets. Yet in bringing my mind to my circumstances there was a struggle. I called to mind the duty & the privilege of laying myself with childlike simplicity & submission, into the hands of my heavenly Father & await his will. Tried to do so & there was peace. I spent a short time only on deck before I awoke one of the natives to signify to Mr. Thurston, that I wished to return, & bid him pass on & awake Mr. Bishop. He met us in the cabin. I then said to them I am called upon in this place to ask the aid of you all. Mr. Bishop proposed opium until reaching Lahaina. I answered, no, it is too late, & if my apprehensions are just, no time is to be lost. The first embarassment that met our way, was that we were in utter darkness; for during the fore part of the night, we had trimmed & replenished, trimmed & replenished the only lamp we could find in the vessel, till we left off in despair with the light extinct. Now one more effort was made, & our flickering taper appeared as if invigorated by sleep....In the mean time Mr. Ruggles repaired with the children to the deck. Mr. Thurston & Mr. Bishop alone remained. Every thing was in due order & in one half hour from the time a general movement was made, infant cries from the cabin apprised even our own natives on deck of what was passing below. They fell upon a mother's ears, yet scarce was I informed of the danger, that its breath might be stopped on the very threshhold of life, when the lamp expired, & its cries ceased together. A lamp, a lamp. It was passed up on deck - renewed, returned, & a spark still more precious again lighted up. The child was safe, but the mother's life was soon felt to be in jeopardy. Never before had I so much reason to feel, that I had reached the isthmus which lies between this & the invisible world. I collected my thoughts to die. But after the lapse of a few hours this train of feeling was suddenly exchanged for those still more overpowering of unmixed gratitude. All was safe. We were now near Lahaina." etc. Address panel with red "New Bedford Ms. Jun. 29" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp and ms. "12-1/2" rate, age spotting and separations, worthy of restoration - a dramatic episode, superbly narrated

E. 1,500-2,000
1,800
Back to Top
2017°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2017, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Honolulu Jan. 2, 1834, "Honolulu Jan. 2, 1834"Honolulu Jan. 2, 1834." Dateline on three-page folded letter from Mary K. Clark to Ann Cofran in South Berwick, Maine, who deplores the decline in moral values: "The mask of hyprocrisy is laid aside, and the true state of the people appears. Attention to instruction is rather indifferent, attendance upon the means of grace has considerably diminished. Our chapel is not filled as formerly...Many that were considered moral are now openly vicious. The ships that touch here are visited in companies by profligate females. Iniquity abounds. And all is owing to the influence of the king," etc.; address panel with red "New Bedford Ms. Jul. 21" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp, ms. "20-3/4" rate, minor internal separations otherwise unusually fresh, Fine and scarce

E. 250-350
1,200
Back to Top
2018°
c
"Honolulu February 16th 1835." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Levi Chamberlain to his sister-in-law in Bath, New York, replying to her account dated Mar. 10, 1834, of "the distressing accident which befell my brother - your beloved husband" and which did not reach him until January 1835, along with an additional letter from August which report his brother's death. Chamberlain's consoling letter tries to keep in mind that nearly a year has passed, but the overall effect is still one of Old Testament gloom; the additional six months which passed before it was received could not have helped. The great delay in news, inherent in these around-the-Horn voyages, is dealt with matter-of-factly: "I was gratifed that you told me the number of your children and gave me their names. Some of them I had learned before - others were new to me. I shall be glad to know more about them, and I wish you to tell me their ages, and write out their names in full....I have four children, two sons and two daughters," etc.; address panel with red "New-York Aug. 12" cds with matching "SHIP" handstamp and erroneously struck "6" in circle (for mail to be delivered at the port of arrival), and then correctly rated in ms. "20-3/4"; stains at corners from old tape mends, ex Ostheimer

E. 300-500
550
Back to Top
2019°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2019, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Waimea Apr. 29, 1836, "Waimea Apr. 29, 1836"Waimea Apr. 29, 1836." Four-page folded letter with cross-writing on two pages, from Betsey Lyons to her sister, Emily Curtis Bliss in Elbridge, N.Y., as she and her husband, Reverend Isaac Bliss, were about to sail for Hawaii as members of the Eighth Company of missionaries. With the infrequency of sailings, Betsey was still adding to this letter in July. It finally left Hawaii October 31, 1836 on the whaler Superior, which arrived in New London April 23, 1837, after Isaac and Emily had left. Forwarded to her husband's family in Warsaw, Illinois, it arrived June 8, 1837. By this time both the Lyon's new son, Luke, so proudly announced in this letter, and his mother, the writer Betsey, had died. Ironically, there are some observations on native mothers and the custom of "hanai": "I am happy to see an improvement in some of the mothers with regard to managing their children. But they cleave to heathenish practices such as giving away their children as soon as they are born & before frequently. Had I time I would now give you an instance of the first scholar in my school, a little girl who has gone 60 miles on foot to obtain the child which she had begged of a member of the church of Kailua a month or so before its birth. This woman has had 4 children before & given them all away. This has been the practice of the higher chiefs. Chiefs never used to nurse their own children. An uncle & aunt have gone with this little girl & they have taken a nurse with them for the child & intend to bring it back with them. The great probability is that it will die on the road. This is not an uncommon instance." etc. The Blisses reached Honolulu on April 9, 1837, and were met by a weakened and dispirited Betsey, who within days became seriously ill, dying on May 14th. Address panel with partly struck "New London Ct. Apr. 23" cds in red with matching "SHIP", ms. rate "20-3/4" and re-rated at Elbridge, N.Y. with "25" added for forwarding to Illinois ("40-3/4" total"), Fine, an extreme and heart-breaking example of the uncertainties of Pacific Ocean mail in this period

E. 1,000-1,250
1,100
Back to Top
2020°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2020, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Honolulu Oahu May 30, 1836, "Honolulu Oahu May 30, 1836"Honolulu Oahu May 30, 1836." Dateline on folded letter to Boston from Stephen Mackintosh, an early Honolulu commission merchant and auctioneer, and later founder of the Sandwich Islands Gazette, Honolulu's first newspaper. His brief message, after many months, must have made frustrating reading: "Remittances are not to be had; neither cash nor merchandise"; ms. "pr. Gen. Glover", fancy "Ship 6" handstamp in red for port of arrival delivery, Very Fine

E. 400-500
900
Back to Top
2021°
c
"Waimea Aug. 15, 1836." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Betsey Lyons to her parents in Elbridge, New York; like the previous letter, this left Hawaii on the whaler Superior on October 31st and was also forwarded to Illinois, arriving on June 8, 1837, after her death. The letter, describing her work and filled with joy and spiritual fervor, records the death of two mission children, Emily Green and David Lyman; outer sheet with red "New London Ct. Apr. 23" cds with matching "SHIP" handstamp, same ms. rates, with forwarding charges totaled to 45-3/4c, internal separations, still Fine

E. 750-1,000
0
Back to Top
2022°
c
"Journal April 29th 1837." Portion of a letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Pittsford, N.Y., in the form of a journal (four pages extant, probably half), beginning with his trip to Kauai in a native schooner to attend to the wife of the Reverend Peter Gulick at Koloa: "30. We were not much sea sick until late this morning and began to congratulate ourselves that we should escape but coming into rough water our hopes were soon blasted. We spent the day upon deck vomiting repeatedly; notwithstanding our weak state we were obliged to support our umbrella to protect us from the burning sun. The cabin was so perfumed with bilge water that we could not endure it." etc. In blessed contrast is the final long entry, a visit to Manoa on June 9th with Dr. Judd: "Manoa was the favorite residence of the distinguished chief Kaahumanuu. It is situated in a lovely valley open at one side to the sea, on all the other sides it is surrounded by high & precipitous mountains. Their steep sides, often almost perpendicular, are partially covered with soil and trees are thinly scattered here & there. The rugged lava often appearing in perpendicular walls is festooned with several species of convolvulus in full bloom & other creeping plants. Numerous ravines are deeply cut in the sides & are wild & romantic in the extreme."; address panel with light Boston cds in red with matching "SHIP" handstamp and ms. "39-1/2" rate; some separations and scotch tape stains, and, despite the absence of the middle sheet, this is still a readable and valuable record by Dr. Andrews

E. 300-500
1,700
Back to Top
2023°
c
"Kailua Oct. 2, 1838. Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Pittsford, N.Y., describing the "severe and dangerous illness" of Lucy Thurston which began as "a slight attack of palsy of the right side," before becoming "alarmingly prostrated so that we had little expectation that she could survive the day; she was however in a measure relieved by the use of stimulants...She required my constant watch perhaps to guard against the sinking turns to which she was subject." He also describes in detail the removal of a tumor from an 18 month old boy, "about the size of a hens egg, situated upon the cheek crowding the nose aside, & shutting up the eye. I first saw the child 10 months before on my journey from Hilo; the tumour increased much. The operation seemed necessary, but the tumour lay so near the lachrymal sac & duct, that I feared some complication with those organs might defeat the operation. At best it must be tedious & distressing to the little patient. I determined to operate. Mr. Forbes assisted me, with natives to hold him. I dissected the tumour nearly from its bed but found as I feared that it was so intimately connected with the lachrymal organs that I could not remove it entirely; I then laid it open & discovered the lachrymal sac in the bottom of the tumour which was filled with a serous fluid; of course it was out of the question to remove the whole sac (sac of the tumour) I cut it off as near the lacrymal sac as possible, after which I dressed the wound. Little or no febrile irritation followed, the wound healed up as readily as could have been expected. The face is somewhat disfigured by the scar and the distortion of the nose, but much improved. The distortion of the nose will probably disappear in some measure at least as the child grows." On another page he explains that the description of the operation "is written with the black substance from the ink fish. Two species are abundant here." (This section shows an oxidation and slight fading noticeably different from the rest of the letter.) Address panel with light New Bedford Mass. cds in red with matching "SHIP" handstamp and blue ms. "52" for double 25c rate plus 2c ship fee, docketed "Recd April 1839", tear at top right with old Scotch tape stain, Very Good, excellent medical content, ex Twigg-Smith

E. 400-500
700
Back to Top
2024°
 
"Kailua, Hawaii, Oct. 4th 1838." Four-page letter from Persis Thurston to her cousin Lucy, written "at the midnight hour," describing the near-fatal illness of her mother: "Our family have lately been called to drink deep of the cup of affliction. We have been called to stand around the sick bed of our beloved mother, and to view her as standing on the very borders of eternity. Five weeks since she was attacked with a paralytic affliction...she betook herself to her couch, and applied to the Dr. for medical advice. He cupped and bled her several times....Dr. and Mrs. Andrews left their home that evening, and remained here with mother for three weeks, watching over, and administering to her wants with the love and solicitude of an own brother and sister....Powerful remedies were used, but apparently without effect. We then had no expectation that she would ever revive again. The scenes of that afternoon were the most solemn and affecting we have ever witnessed. To be so suddenly called to part with a mother, no more to see her face in the flesh, no more to receive her pious instructions, and maternal admonitions, was a trial almost too great for us to bear." etc. The letter ends with news of her mother's slow recovery, and with this note scribbled in the margin: "A vessel now here sails for Oahu today. A whale ship is there to leave for the United States in a few days." Fine, affecting content

E. 500-600
525
Back to Top
2025°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2025, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Per Brig Thomas Perkins Via Cape Horn, "Per Brig Thomas Perkins Via Cape Horn"Per Brig Thomas Perkins Via Cape Horn." Scarce manuscript endorsement on four-page folded letter datelined "Honolulu Oahu Dec. 19th 1839" from Charlotte Knapp - who with her husband Horton, a teacher, were members of the Eighth Company of missionaries - to Hannah Knapp in Roundhill, Conn. She writes (in part): "We have boarders besides a great deal of company, which is one of the duties of missionaries residing at this station and from which those living at out stations are almost entirely free. Strangers are almost constantly arriving from one place and another to whom we must extend our hospitalities....I have been told that there are more than 60 scientific men connected with the exploring expedition that is expected here in March. Three gentlemen arrived from the Columbia River last week who crossed the Rocky Mountains and expect to return by way of Cape Horn....We have had quite an interesting account from Ascension Island from Capt. Joy. A foreigner residing there wrote a letter by him to Mr. Diell Seaman's Chaplain here requesting him to send them a minister as soon as possible for they felt that they had souls to save." etc. Address panel with partly struck "SHIP" in red, no townmark, ms. "12" rate, pencil docketing indicates April 30th. If this letter actually went on the Thomas Perkins, it did not sail until January 6 - a trip of slightly less than four months, and a remarkably quick one; light staining on face and tiny tear at bottom, otherwise Fine, intriguing usage, ex Harris, Ishikawa, illustrated in Meyer-Harris, p.5

E. 1,500-2,000
1,400
Back to Top
2026°
c
"Kailua Feb. 8, 1840." Dateline on three-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Pittsford, N.Y., describing a ship wreck: "Supplies for families on Maui & for two or three stations on this Island including Kailua were put on board a native vessel to be delivered to several families. The vessel was detained by rough weather until her food ran low when the Capt. most foolhardily anchored off the north shore of Maui under a bold precipitous shore to obtain food; while there a wind arose blowing directly in shore, the anchor was got up with intention of getting to sea, but she went directly on shore in a tremendous surf & in a few moments was dashed in pieces." He then describes in detail what was lost, including a small library and letters from families ("all that could be found of them was mush,") and adds, "[We] were daily expecting to welcome a bountiful package of letters from our dear friends. the Lord has ordered otherwise & we do not murmur. Perhaps we were looking too much to earthly sources for our happiness & our heavenly Father would give us a gentle admonition." He also notes that "This wreck has given an illustration of the change in the character of this people. When the brethren arrived at the spot they did not find the natives rifling boxes & barrels...but kindly engaged in preserving & drying what the waves had spared.") etc.; back of cover with partial strike of Vera Cruz prepaid cds (legible examples in this collection include the word "Franqueado"), address panel with light red New York cds and ms. "20-3/4" rate; old tape stain on back affects cds, Fine

E. 750-1,000
700
Back to Top
2027°
c
"Sand. Isl. Hawaii Kailua June 25th 1840." Dateline on closely written four-page folded letter from Parnelly Andrews to a Miss Winston in Pittsford, N.Y. She writes about the ship wreck previously mentioned by her husband (see lot 2026) and hopes her friends and family will re-write their letters. There is also an interesting description of a native girl Mrs. Andrews met at a meeting: "Her only garment was an under garment of unbleached cotton, probably having done faithful service for several weeks without being subjected to the destructive process of washing. Over her shoulders hung the tattered remnant of a native kapa. Her hair long & stiff did not look as tho' it had been combed in a week...the remains of her dinner were adhering to her hands & face....But this case is not selected for its novelty, no, it is a specimen of the common appearance of Sand. I. females, tho' often they wear merely a piece of kapa wrapped around the body instead of a garment. But then there are many who have one or more good silk or calico dresses & when a garment becomes old & torn, they if able to purchase a new one, put it on one & thus sometimes wear four or five garments or portions of them, at once. No matter for the tassels & fringes which adorn the bottom of their clothes. Rags, even so unclean are no disparagement to Sand. Islanders. Except a few individuals including the high Chiefs & even some of those their appearance is often disgusting & excessive." etc. This left on the bark Flora August 3rd with the Bingham and Thurston families and did not arrive in New York until Feb. 4, 1841 where it was postmarked the next day and rated "20-3/4"; small tears and light soiling, Fine

E. 300-400
800
Back to Top
2028°
c
"Waialua, Oahu, Sandwich Islands, July 28, 1840." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Ursula Emerson, wife of the Reverend John Emerson, members of the Fifth Company, to Mrs. Betsey E. Hoit in Sandwich, New Hampshire, confiding to her some of the trials of raising four boys: "A sense of my responsibility sometimes almost weighs me down. It is no light thing to be the mother, teacher & every thing of a family of children in this dark land. Sick or well she must exercise the same unceasing watchfulness, except what aid the Father can give," etc. She hopes this letter will go with the Reverend Hiram Bingham and his wife, Sybil, who are returning to the U.S. on the advice of physicians who feel a voyage will restore Mrs. Bingham's health. They sailed with Mrs. Thurston and her children on the Flora, bound for New York on August 3rd but this letter left September 14th on the whaler L.C. Richmond; red "New Bedford Ms. Feb. 2" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp and ms. "12-1/2" re-rated to 14-1/2, Fine

E. 750-1,000
0
Back to Top
2029°
c
"Honolulu July 31, 1840." 2-1/2pp folded letter from the Reverend Asa Thurston to his brother-in-law David Goodale, hand-carried by his wife Lucy, who sailed with their children on the Flora for the purpose (as described in this letter) of furthering their education in America: "The Board make[s] no provision for this. They allow, it is true, forty or fifty dollars a year for a child till they are eighteen years. This however makes no provision for their education. It might keep them from starvation & that is all," etc., Very Fine

E. 150-200
500
Back to Top
2030°
c
"Waimea Sept. 24, 1841." Dateline on an important four-page folded letter from the Reverend Lorenzo Lyons to his father-in-law, Simeon Curtis, regarding the abusive behavior of Curtis's son-in-law, the Reverend Isaac Bliss : "From his very first arrival at the Islands I perceived that he did not treat his wife kindly. He used expressions which were unkind. I perceived too that it was a great mistake that he ever became a missionary. He has conducted [himself] in such a manner during the last two years as to destroy my confidence in his missionary character. Your daughter will tell you how she has been treated by him, & that too in my own house. His character as a husband & as a missionary, has been examined by the Mission. They were on the point of sending him home at once. But they wished to exercise mildness in his case so they gave him the privilege of asking permission to return to America....He has expressed penitence, & perhaps he has manifested such a feeling in the presence of some....I have been an eyewitness of his conduct but not an eyewitness of his penitence....This will not excuse him for fastening the bedroom door against his wife, & forbidding her to enter until she had performed a most unreasonable request - this will not excuse him for calling his wife a liar...this will not excuse him for seizing her with violent hands & carrying her upstairs, in the midst of her cries for help." etc. He also reports the birth of his son, Albert Brown Lyons, and recalls his first, late wife, Betsey Curtis: "Yes, it was 4 years since I had seen the grave that contains the relics of our beloved Betsey. As I thought of the past, many pleasing & painful recollections crowded into my mind. but she will rise again, a glorious form." Address panel with red "New Bedford Ms. Mar. 1" cds with matching "SHIP" handstamp and ms. "27" rate, Very Fine. The Bliss episode is described at length in Paths of Duty, a study of missionary wives by Patricia Grimshaw, as well as other works

E. 500-750
1,300
Back to Top
2031°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2031, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Waimea Nov. 5th 1841, "Waimea Nov. 5th 1841"Waimea Nov. 5th 1841." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents. He mentions a visit to the Reverend Elias Bond and his family in Kohala, and gives a long description of Kauai. The rest of the letter shows the doctor's mixed feelings regarding the sincerity of the natives, referring to "the dark side of native character" and ends with this lament: "The catholics are making some progress. By the grace of god our church numbers generally stand fast. By holding up French men-of-war, in terrorism, they tyrannize over the chiefs & keep them in constant fear of bringing down French vengeance. Under the cover of French guns they are as impudent a set of fellows as you will find in any land. I once accidently met of them at Gov. Adams in his presence & that of Kekanhiohi, the prime minister and had some conversation with them, but they became so angry, that I thought it best to say but little, by way of keeping cool. The Gov. afterwards said that if he had not been present they would have torn me in pieces." Address panel with red "Salem Mass Apr. 21" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp, red ms. "20-3/4", forwarded from Pittsford N.Y. to Armada Michigan with readdressing & postage in blue ms. and totaling 45-3/4c; the endorsement, "Favor of Mr. Castle" refers to Samuel Northrup Castle, Asst. Superintendent of Secular Affairs for the Mission, who after the death of his wife returned to the U.S. with his daughter Mary. They sailed on the William Gray, which left Honolulu December 2, 1841, arriving at Boston, Apr. 20, 1842. If this letter did not reach Castle in time, it may have been taken directly by whalers; cover with tiny edge tears, still Fine, a particularly attractive usage from the Andrews correspondence

E. 600-800
1,100
Back to Top
2032°
c
"Kailua Dec. 1841." Dateline on four-page folded letter with additional cross-writing on two pages, from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Armada, Michigan, in a cheerful frame of mind after receiving a letter from them. He gives a description of the fruits available on the Islands, the animals they own, etc. But then he reports the death of the Thurston's daughter, Lucy, in Brooklyn, New York, at the age of 18 (Mrs. Thurston had brought her children to the U.S. for the purpose of continuing the education of the eldest three). "Even when Lucy lay in her coffin & all the remaining children were sick around her, & subsequently when two were brought to the borders of the grave & in relation to our hope had almost fled, [Mrs. Thurston's] letters show that she was calm & prepared for any emergency." Dr. Andrews notes with professional pride the attendence of four physicians during Lucy's illness, free of charge; address panel with clear "Warren R.I. Jun. 27" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp, ms. "52" (double 25c rate for over 400 miles + ship captain's fee), small paper loss not affecting text to any significant degree and light soiling, still Fine

E. 300-500
450
Back to Top
2033°
 
Lucy Thurston's Journal Aboard the Victoria. Twelve pages, written March 24-July 19, 1842, on her way back to the Sandwich Islands with her children Mary and Thomas, and addressed to Persis and Asa, both of whom were attending school in America. Events include rough passage in the Gulf Stream, various injuries, the loss of an officer who was swept overboard, the surprisingly easy trip around the Horn ("I tried to prepare myself & children for the worst. But it was like viewing death at a distance,"), etc. The journal ends within sight of Valparaiso ("July 19. Letters must be off."), Very Fine

E. 750-1,000
750
Back to Top
2034°
c
"Honolulu June 3d/42." Dateline on 3-1/2pp folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Armada, Michigan. Neither could have enjoyed reading this report on the death of three children from diarrhea, including a rather graphic description of the death of his daughter, Elizabeth ("by Monday or Tuesday her discharges showed rather less blood & the mucous was changed somewhat in appearance. The fecal discharges became more natural, & we had hopes that she would recover but she continued to grow feeble,"etc.); address panel with partial New Orleans La. Nov. 17 cds in blue and matching "SHIP" handstamp with ms. "27" rate, most likely sent via Mazatlan and Vera Cruz, based on similar Andrews covers and his observation here: "we hear rumors of war from Mexico & suppose it uncertain whether letters will go safely"; tear at top edge and small paper loss affecting text slightly; otherwise Fine

E. 600-800
0
Back to Top
2035°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2035, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Honolulu S.I, "Honolulu S.I"Honolulu S.I. Jany 19/44" Dateline on 4-page folded letter to Danbury Conn., completed February 26th, written by Amos Starr Cooke, who, with this wife, headed a school in Honolulu for the children of the higher chiefs (which from 1846 on was known as the "Royal School"): "We are fed & clothed & have nought to think of but our precious children & the souls by whom we are surrounded. Alas! that we feel & do so little for them! Our interesting scholars share the largest in our sympathy & efforts & prayers. But none of them are yet converted. They can converse intelligibly in English - read - write - cypher - parse - spell - study Geography - sing - drawing (linear) - 2 boys play flute & two girls play on a piano forte...but all this avails us nothing comparatively, while we see them exposed to the damnation of hell..." etc. Rev. Cooke also describes the visit of a French man-of-war, the take-over of the Society Islands by France, a trip around Oahu, and some observations on the recognition of the independence of the Islands: "Alas that that mission [Society Islands] should be exposed to the tender mercies of Catholics. It had nearly been so with our mission, had not God interfered & sent an embassy to England, France & U.S. to secure the independence of this Hawaiian nation. God's dealings with this mission & nation have ever been almost miraculous....We are daily looking for intelligence from that embassy by way of Mexico & also for an English Consular general in the person of Genl. Miller, a gentleman who visited the islands some 15 years since. The Year 1843 will ever be a memorable one in the annals of this nation & not much less the present year when the Ambassadors shall return, & changes be made, upon a more sure foundation in the Laws & Legislation thereof of this more than ever interesting group. And, not many years will elapse before those now composing our family will be exerting a great influence for good, or for evil, upon the sophisticated dwellers in these islands of the Pacific." etc. He also mentions the arrival of Admiral Richard Thomas: "His sympathy is with the Missionaries. His report, when he reaches home, will set things in their true light. Heretofore, England has heard only one side. I refer particularly to the letters & representation of her former consul, Mr. Charlton, who was a sworn enemy to the mission & all they did for the good of the people. The grand secret of all foreigners' opposition to missionaries is that they teach the people the seventh commandment - I need add no more." When Consul Miller arrived, he brought with him a convention which was a substitute for the "articles" signed by Kamehameha III and Lord Edward Russell in 1836. Although signed on February 12, 1844, this was a near copy of the French convention forced on Kamehameha III by Capt. Laplace in 1839 and containing the same objectionable articles which placed limitations upon the sovereignty of the king. Cover endorsed "via Mexico" ("I do not know as I should tax you with the postage of a letter that way"), clear "FRANCO EN/VERACRUZ" two-line handstamp, blue "New Orleans La. Jun. 14" cds, matching "SHIP" with blue ms. "27" rate; the letter left Honolulu on March 4th with Admiral Thomas on the British naval ship Dublin, Fine, excellent content and a rare Mexican marking on Hawaiian mail

E. 5,000-7,500
5,000
Back to Top
2036°
c
"Kailua Feb. 8, 1845." Dateline on closely written four-page folded letter from Parnelly Andrews to her mother-in-law, who in a previous letter wondered if the Andrews children could be left in the care of Christian natives. Parnelly replies, "I have not yet seen the S. Islander with whom I would willingly trust Geo. alone 15 minutes. The standard of propriety is so low among them....There is no subject upon which parents & children, brothers & sisters, male & female, will not converse with equal freedom. When a birth takes place it is still common for friends & neighbors, old & young, children & all, to be present. For the expression of their thoughts they have no refined language, no circumlocution, but instead, their words are accompanied with the most expressive gestures, so that even if children do not understand the native tongue, much could be learned by merely looking at them when engaged in conversation...tho' G. understands but very few words, & those such as we are obliged to use often in giving directions to domestics, yet we do not allow him to be in the room. We called Kealoha a good girl, & she is, as good as I have been acquainted with among natives. I took almost endless pains to instruct her in the rules of propriety as also did Mrs. T. & P. & L. still she will to this hour, just as soon engage in conversation with a room full of men upon subjects which civilized reputable females would never think of speaking upon in any circumstances." etc. A portion of the letter includes an affectionate message from George to his grandmother describing his baby sister (who died a few months later); address leaf with bold red "New Bedford Ms. Sep. 3" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp, ms. "12" rate written over what appears to be an erased "27" - put there out of habit as the new postal rates had taken effect on July 1st, and a reminder to the Andrews family in Michigan that they saved 15c; Fine usage and contents

E. 300-500
650
Back to Top
2037°
c
"Kailua Nov. 20th 1845." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his brother in Armada Mich., it picks up again on Feb. 17, 1846, and was completed on May 6th. The interesting contents include a treatise on shells, a long account with diagram of the rain and winds of Kona, as well as a description of the ti plant and how to cook its roots. Finally he devotes a page to the discussion of the kinds of furniture being made for use by the missionaries including three tiny drawings of settees; this letter rounded the Horn on the ship Niantic, leaving Honolulu August 17th. The local newspaper The Polynesian had reported on July 17, 1845, that the overland mail via Mazatlan "for a year past has been about 130 days, quite as long as via Cape Horn." The route was shut down entirely in 1846 during the war with Mexico and the Niantic was the first vessel to round the Horn since May; address panel with bold red "New-York 12cts Ship 1 Feb." cds for the over-300 miles rate of 10c + 2c ship fee, some internal separations, Fine

E. 600-800
1,000
Back to Top
2038°
c
"Kailua Apr. 14, 1846." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Armada, Michigan, and completed on July 8th. In the meantime, on his birthday, June 24th, he announces the birth of his fourth child, Charles Thurston Andrews; by the 26th, Charles is afflicted with the dysentery that had earlier killed his two sisters and would eventually take his mother's life and his own, at age two. The letter also mentions making a pump to draw water from the cellar, and describes the mixed blessing of receiving letters from America in quantity (and trying to answer them with one eye on sailing dates), and some observations on Dr. Judd: "The King is now surrounded by a considerable number of foreign officers in various capacities. Doct. Judd is at the head of finance under the new organization & is perhaps the most influential of the company. He is much spoken evil of by many & you may see something of it in the papers. do not however credit all you see from anonymous correspondents of Am. papers. I have the most perfect confidence in Doct. J.s character & his sincere desire to do the best in his power for the nation." Address panel with same bold red "New-York 12cts Ship 1 Feb." cds as the letter to his brother, both of them carried on the ship Niantic on August 1th; minor soiling, Fine

E. 400-500
850
Back to Top
2039°
c
"Waimea Hawaii Sept. 7, 1846." Dateline on 3-1/2pp folded letter from a lonely Reverend Lorenzo Lyons to his brother in Montrose, Pa.: "We are social beings & sympathetic beings - but sociality & sympathy need to be cultivated - & the means of cultivating them must be used - or else we degenerate into stoics. You are surrounded with society - & perhaps an excess of it...leads you to sigh for solitude. But when you get sick of society remember your solitary brother on the Sandwich Islands. He has a wife to be sure & a few children & they form about all the civilized & profitable society he enjoys. If you only realized what solitude means - & what it is to be deprived of good & cheerful society - you would know better the value I place on anything that shows there are other beings in the world asides myself and family." etc.; this left Honolulu aboard the bark Angola on Oct. 3rd, address panel with light strikes of Boston cds in red, matching "SHIP" and "7" handstamp for the less-than-300 miles rate to Montrose + 2c ship fee, ms. docketing shows a Feb. 10, 1847 receiving date, Fine

E. 400-500
500
Back to Top
2040°
c
"Honolulu Jan. 16, 1847 Island of Oahu." Dateline on five-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Armada, Michigan, and which shows him in a playful frame of mind despite the recent death of his wife, Parnelly. A portion of the letter is a copy of a journal set in rhyme (with helpful footnotes) supposedly composed by his six-month old son, Charles Thurston, though the real author appears to have been Mary Howe Thurston (described by the doctor as his son's amanuensis): "My father dear,/Aunt Thurston here,/Does think that I/ To write should try;/So the first time,/I write in rhyme." etc. He also includes a copy of a letter from his eldest child, George Pierce, written at Kailua while his father was in Maui ("Some mornings we feel sleepy & don't get up till six. This morning we did a little better & got up at 20 minutes past four"). There is brief reference to his depression ("If my letters had a speedy passage you may by this time have received the intelligence of my affliction. You will weep with me but I am thankful you know not the depths of the wound."). He also notes how this letter will travel ("a ship is soon to sail for U.S. via China") while referring to an earlier letter to his brother Charles ("If the Mexicans don't take her"); address panel with partial "New-York 12cts Ship Jul. 13" cds in red, minor edge wear, Fine

E. 400-500
675
Back to Top
2041°
c
"Waimea Hawaii April 10, 1847." Dateline on four-page folded letter from the Reverend Lorenzo Lyons to his sister Adaline in Colrain, Mass., thanking for her letter of May 8, 1846, which he received only a few days before. In addition to listing some necessities for a future package from home ("dried fruit, a little tea, a few raisins, pins, needles, pencils, buttons, thread, woolen socks, yarn,"), and detailing various minor illnesses and complaints, he describes his work: "absent about 3 weeks at a time from home, - leaving my family all alone - I have 21 schools in my field - about 1000 scholars - 16 churches - about 2000 church members - 15 temperance societies - 15 or 20 sabbath schools - 15 benevolent societies - the people have contributed last year about 190 dollars in cash & various articles towards my support & about 40 dollars for foreign missions - they are very poor for the most part. The people are advancing in civilization." Address panel with red "New-York 7cts Ship Jan. 4" (1848) cds, Very Fine. When he sent this letter, the first U.S. stamps had yet to be issued; by the time it arrived the 1847 Issue was already six months old

E. 300-400
600
Back to Top
2042°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2042, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Punahou Isl. of Oahu May 19th 1847, "Punahou Isl. of Oahu May 19th 1847"Punahou Isl. of Oahu May 19th 1847." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents, completed on the 25th. He writes of the Punahou School: "The children at Honolulu board at home; the children from other stations, to the number of 15 last term, board here. Mr. Dole is the principal teacher, but is assisted by his wife formerly (Mrs. Knapp), Mr. & Mrs. Rice & Miss Smith. Mr. Rice assists in teaching, but has also a chief oversight of the business affairs, & of the plantation in which the boys labor. The families all sit at a common table. Miss Smith is head of the kitchen & all the eating department. The other ladies oversee their own households & the rooms & clothes of the pupils." He includes a small sketch of the school and notes, "The whole is made of adobies (that is mud bricks) plastered & covered with thatch, except Mr. Rices part which is of stone. The stone part is two stories high & the upper part is used for [a] school room...I find it pleasanter staying here than at the village." etc. Dr. Andrew's also includes a small sketch showing the location of the graves of his wife, daughter and Mrs. Elizabeth Bishop; address panel with red "New-York 12cts Ship Jan. 4" cds, no ship endorsement though he notes at the end of letter, "The vessel sails to day via China." Fine

E. 400-500
1,050
Back to Top
2043°
c
"Kailua July 16, 1847." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Michigan, completed on the 28th, and which includes a description of his inter-island travels: "I left Honolulu June 21st (Monday eve) had a tedious passage & did not reach Lahaina until Thursday P.M. Lay there 2 days & sailed Sat. towards eve for Kawaihae 40 miles north of Kailua. We anchored at Kawaihae Sabbath at 1 o'clock P.M. Monday discharged passengers & cargo & at 9 P.M. sailed again had a good breeze & reached Mr. Thurston's Tuesday morn to a late breakfast. I was not much sea sick after the first two days, & was able to eat my allowance with the rest." He also writes in the margin of one page: "I see it is proposed to Congress to establish a route from U. States via Chagres & Panama to Oregon & other places in Pacific. If it should be carried out it will save many a long voyage around Cape Horn." Address panel with lightly struck New Bedford Mass. cds (probably Feb. 15th date) with matching "SHIP" handstamp and ms. "12" rate, light soiling and small toned spot, Fine, desirable contents, particularly with the reference to the Act of March 3, 1847

E. 400-500
300
Back to Top
2044°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2044, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Kailua Oct. 6th 1847, "Kailua Oct. 6th 1847"Kailua Oct. 6th 1847." Dateline on four-page folded letter from Dr. Seth Andrews to his parents in Michigan. He begins,"I have just learned that an opportunity presents to send letters via Panama. It is now 8 P.M. & I expect a vessel in the morning." Despite the endorsement, "Via Panama By Georgiana", the cover did not enter the mails until Mar. 11, 1848 and may have been sent around the Horn instead; address panel with faint red cds of Westerley R.I. with matching clear "SHIP" handstamp, ms. "12" rate for the 10c over 300 miles rate + 2c ship captain's fee, large closed tear at top, Fine appearance. By the time he wrote this letter, the doctor had lost his two daughters and his wife, and in poor health himself, was left to care for his two sons, age nine and one. The youngest, Charles, was in precarious health, and died two months before this letter reached its destination (see lot 2054). Dr. Andrews returned to America in 1848; this is the final letter in the correspondence

E. 250-350
525
Back to Top
2045°
c
Sale Number 769, Lot Number 2045, Missionaries Correspondence and Early Hawaiian Letters"Honolulu, June 14, 1851, "Honolulu, June 14, 1851"Honolulu, June 14, 1851." Dateline on folded letter to Sandwich, N.H., from the Reverend John Emerson, a member of the Fifth Company, to his sister, Mrs. B.E. Hoyte. Written an hour before Samuel Castle was to sail, he says (in part): "If you see the Anti-Slavery papers you will see that Bro. Jonathan [sic] S. Green of Makawao on Maui is the Hero of the Sandwich Isls. for every good work especially in his efforts to emancipate this people & procure for them lands &c. &c. Now be it known unto you & you may whisper it unto the ears of your husband if you choose - that I two years since accepting a commission from the Hawaiian Govt to sell to Native Sandwich Islanders all the Govt. lands in Waialua at least 20,000 acres - be it known further that I have sold about all of these lands to poor natives at the moderate price of from 25c to $50 per acre but most of it at a price not exceeding 50 cts. Yes & where Bro. Greene has sinned once in selling land to natives I have sinned four times for I have sold to about four times as many as he has if I am rightly informed. Br. G. gets praise at home I get most hearty curses from foreigners....if I would see my people industrious & civilized, they must own lands, flocks & herds & become each a man for himself." etc. There is also an interesting remark about images: "Now had we a Daguerreotype artist here I assure you if he was not extravagant in his demands we would try & get all on to one piece of plate for you to see us." In suggesting she and her husband visit the Islands, he says in closing: "I think it would make you both young again & give you enough to think of all the rest of your lives." Address leaf with ms. "Politeness of S.N. Castle Esq." (In 1851, Mr. Castle was released from the A.B.C.F.M. and went into the mercantile business with Amos Cooke under the name of Castle and Cooke.) While this letter was in his keeping, the postal rates changed - this was mailed at the 10c rate for unpaid letters sent over 3,000 miles, on July 15. The unusually detailed docketing includes documenting the travel time ("35 days to California/38 days from there here/73"), etc., Fine. Emerson's description of government land sales refers to the practice of fee simple ownership for Hawaiian subjects, begun experimentally in 1846 (even before a new law was passed) and based on proposals of Dr. Gerrit Judd as Minister of the Interior, which included the appointment of a land commission and a review of the whole system of land tenures

E. 400-500
1,300
Back to Top
2046°
c
"Waimea Hawaii, Oct. 12, 1852." Dateline on four-page folded letter from the Reverend Lorenzo Lyons to a younger sister of his late wife, in Moline, Ill.; address leaf with "New Bedford Ms. Apr. 8" cds with matching "SHIP" handstamp and "7." Although all mail was to go through the Honolulu post office after 1851, occasionally letters went directly from the neighboring islands to the East Coast, bypassing even San Francisco - the normal port of entry after 1849. This letter was given to Mrs. Lyon's sister who was planning a trip to Illinois and apparently gave it to the ship's captain for entry in the mails in New Bedford, rather than hand-carry it herself, Fine usage

E. 500-600
400
Back to Top
2047°
c
Letters of Dr. Seth Andrews. Balance of the correspondence, four folded letters including one datelined "Hilo June 7th 1843" and apparently sent via Mexico (blue New Orleans "SHIP" etc.), describing a volcano, a skirmish between Tahitian natives and the French ("The French it is now certain have been determined to take possession here") etc.; another is datelined "Kailua July 15, 1845" with a report of the flu epidemic which claimed the life of their daughter Lucy, followed by a description of her unpleasant death in Dr. Andrew's singularly graphic manner; address panel with red "New Bedford Ms. May 2" cds and matching "SHIP" handstamp. The lot also includes a farewell letter from Dr. Andrews to his parents on the eve of his departure in 1836 from Boston as a member of the Eighth Company of missionaries and a similar one from his wife Parnelly; last letter with tape stains, otherwise a Fine group [For your info 3771, 72, 2986, 87

E. 500-750
750
Back to Top
Copyright 2021. All rights reserved by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. Information and images may be used with credit to Siegel Auction Galleries or siegelauctions.com subject to guidelines and restrictions.
Website Terms of Use and Privacy Policy