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Sale 764A — Autographs and Historical Documents

Sale Date — Saturday, 10 December, 1994

Category — Union and Confederate Soliders Correspondences

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
469
 
The Appley Correspondence. 28 letters, mostly from Dan Appley of the 149th Reg., Pa. Vols., in the Army of the Potomac to his brother Tom, includes an excellent description of life "In front of Petersburg,", vignettes of foiling an attempt to blow up a fort, shooting a Union soldier attempting to desert, regrets his otherwise fine commander "gets a little too drunk sometimes", old veterans dying off ("Grant is giving the rebellion a heavy blow but he is killing men pretty fast,") etc., one letter criticizes Lincoln, discusses slavery, another letter from a family friend gives a detailed description of Mechanicsville, etc., includes 2 on patriotic lettersheets, another on printed DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF DESERTERS, lot includes military pass and an undated and unsigned essay entitled LYING and addressed to "Mr. President." Most letters with original envelopes, Fine group

E. 600-800
1,250
470
 
The Correspondence of R.G. Ardrey. 42 letters, mostly from this member of the 111th Reg., Ill. Vols. to his family & friends, written from Kentucky, Tenn. and Georgia, 1863-1865, also includes a portion of a diary, many letters with original envelopes, Fine lot

E. 600-800
1,400
Back to Top
471
 
The Letters of Alexander Ayers 160 war-dated letters (Sept. 1862-June 1865) from this Quartermaster in the 125 Ill. Vols. to his wife. Until the summer of 1863 Ayers was part of the occupation force in Nashville- one gets a good sense of army life here on a day by day basis, with descriptions of camp life, the city, visiting President's Polk's tomb, listening to a sermon by Parson Brownlow ("the most scathing thing I ever heard- he considers the Devil small potatoes compared with traitors & copperheads") etc. He later saw action at Chattanooga, and with Sherman's army followed Johnston's army in Ga. (Dalton, New Hope Church, etc.). Includes a good series of letters during Kennesaw Mountain ("We found a great many of our men but could recognize them only by their clothes- their bodies & especially their faces were a moving map of maggots,"), and Atlanta, the last group follows the army through the Carolina, news of Richmond' fall, thoughts on Lincoln and Davis, etc., lot includes chronological data, cabinet photo of Ayers, some pre-war letters, documents, etc. Fine group, offered intact

E. 4,000-6,000
5,750
Back to Top
472
 
The Papers of Joseph Caldwell. Twelve items, includes 4 war-dated letters from this member of the 1st Reg., Mass. vols., 2 are on patriotic stationery incl. handsome McClellan design, also included are two Rewards of Merit (Magnus imprints), tiny engraved portrait of Lincoln with inscription to his niece, two pension documents, etc., all on pages with write-up, Fine lot

E. 300-400
160
Back to Top
473
 
The Letters of Jacob Dannaker. 12 letters from this Pa. private to his family in Philadelphia, Oct. 1861-Feb. 25, 1865, details of camp life, recovering from wounds (apparently at Gettsburg), bitter comment about the abolitionist Wendell Phillips' lecture: "...you can tell pop that I don't believe a word of it he don't give our genls or president any praise at all he is as bad as the copperheads all he thinks of is the nigger and I say the nigger is not the equal of a white man he says either he is or Gen. Banks is a fool I think he (Phillips) is a damn fool and old Abe is worth a dozen of him so you need not send me any more of his lectures for he wants to make a nigger better than a white man he says Antietam and Gettysburg were fruitless victories I say he is a liar," etc. Attractively mounted with original envelopes, Fine group

E. 300-500
450
Back to Top
474
 
The Eldridge Letters. Large group of approx. 65, mostly between Dr. E.J. Elridge, a surgeon in General H. Cobb's brigade (and later Genl. Wofford's ), and his wife, contents incl. discussion of Northern democrats after Gettysburg: "There was even talk of putting Lincoln out of the way,", mention of receiving a letter sent via Nassau, wild rumor of Stonewall Jackson annihilating 10,000 Union troops, various references to Genl. Bryan (a family friend),particularly his health (he resigned his commission Sept. 1864) etc. Lot includes such curiosities as a letter "written" by a baby (lettersheet with wild pencil scribbling), two locks of womens's hair; letterhead of "Headquarters Georgia Reserves & District of Georgia"; small group of Apr. '61 letters from Philadelphia, Pa. A number of original envelopes are present- some with stamps, a number uncanceled, not of major philatelic value but several with interesting military addresses incl. one hand-carried by Goode Bryan, a fascinating trove worthy of transcription and research

E. 2,500-3,000
2,500
Back to Top
475
 
The Letters of John Gay. 11 letters from a Mass. private who did not join the army until the summer of 1864, readable contents with the usual complaints about drills, lack of pay and poor food but references to Grant closing in on Lee, Lee's surrender, defense of Sherman's actions, victory parade in Washington, last letter before going home etc., 9 with original envelopes, Fine group

E. 300-500
325
Back to Top
476
 
The Letters of Stephen Green. Approx. 20 letters to his wife, includes two lists giving a chronology of the regiment he asked his wife to preserve in case his diary was lost. Letters often about endless marches under conditions which inspired Green to be AWOL for a time, conviently during Chancellorville and Gettysburg (he notes that much of his regiment was"taken prisoner or killed & wounded" at the latter battle), includes a letter from his wife, some original covers and 1 McClellan lettersheet, Fine group

E. 400-500
270
Back to Top
477
 
The Letters of P.T. Heath. Only three, but all excellent content, APr. 17, Apr. 23 and July 22, 1862, includes good decriptions of the Viriginia countryside and local inhabitants who "...seem to be friendly enough to your face but if you turn around look out for a bullet in the back,", etc., queasy details on the quality of food and the prevalence of dysentery (this letter ends: "i do not want you to let mother know anything of this...i only rote this that you may know what we have to endure but not one complaining if I could get something to eat that I wanted i could stand it"), comments on rebel fortifcations ("nothing but scare crows,"), built only to deceive "our men, they are in their own country while we are strangers,", etc.

E. 150-200
90
Back to Top
478
 
Michigan Soldiers' Letters. Five, from brothers Lewis and Stephen George to their sister, 1863-65, mentions review of troops by Grant; Hooker relieving Burnside; letter from field hospital in front of Petersburg describing bombardment, rumors of "another demonstration of the little city across the river called Fredericksburg. I hope not." etc., Fine lot

E. 150-200
130
Back to Top
479
 
The Letters of Hiram Miller. 14 letters from a former teacher who joined the 1st Wisconsin Reg., good descriptions of camp life, environment, skirmishes, etc. He was involved in the Stones River Campaign, Chickamaugua, Murphreesboro, etc., one letter is on patriotic stationery, etc., a well-written group

E. 400-500
850
Back to Top
480
 
The Letters of Genl. George Nye. Bvt. Brig. Genl. Ten affectionate letters to his wife, one with drawing of his quarters, another with Capitol building letterhead, also includes telegram from Harpers Ferry, letter from his wife, hand-written poem, 1883 military letter from Mexico, etc., Fine lot

E. 300-500
375
Back to Top
481
 
The Letters of John Ray. Collection of 79 letters, 1861-1865 , from a sgt. of the 121st Pa. Vols. He ran the commissary, assisted the Provost Marshall, and worked with the ambulance corp. Ray recorded the death of Stonewall Jackson, saw the removal of Genl. Warren by Sheridan, worked under Burnside, Meade and his hero Genl. Grant. He predicts Sherman's march, Lee's defeat, the end of the war by 1865 and prphetically notes that "there will be an even greater rebellion" to finally settle the social and economic issues of the Union. There are detailed descriptions of battlefield carnage, dragging off the dead and wounded, etc. He was at Gettysburg, Chancellorville, the siege of Petersburg, the tunnel explosion, etc., many letters with original envelopes, Very Fine, one man's complete record of his war service

E. 2,500-3,000
4,000
Back to Top
482
 
The Rice Family Papers. 12 letters of this Confederate family, includes letters to son Henry while he was at Hampden Sidney College, one warning him not to get involved in a student parole exchange, discussion of Northern war expenses, extortion in the country, death of Genl. Zollikoffer, etc.; letters from son Thomas in 3rd Va. cavalry: "we are still in tents Gen. Magruder forbidding our building winter quarters...Most of the troops have lost all confidence in Magruder both as a General & as a man of honror & I think justly so. I dispise him." etc. Henry eventually joined the 14th Va. cavalry and in one letter he refers to being pursued by "Hunter, Crook & Averill", two letters show a very warm exchange with his female cousin Gordon; lot includes several original envelopes including ms. postmarks from Coles Ferry Va., "Held For Postage" oval hs from Richmond, "10" in circle from Petersburg, etc., Fine and desirable group

E. 500-600
450
Back to Top
483
 
The Letters and Manuscripts of Maj. William Shaw. Member of the 38th Indiana, approx. 41 letters to family members, nearly 150 pages, Shaw saw fighting in Tennessee and Georgia, includes Oath of Office, several general or special orders, request for leave with signature of Genl. W.P. Carlin, etc. In addition there are two very interesting manuscripts by Shaw, one a 1874 10-page account of a visit to the Jonesboro battlefield and Andersonville Prison with partial list of names of the 38th Ind. he found in the cemetery; also a 5-page draft of an 1895 speech on the death of Genl. Walter Q. Gresham. Fascinating lot, largely untouched, in need of organization & research; offered for the first time

E. 750-1,000
1,800
Back to Top
484
 
Union Soldiers' Letters. Two correspondences, includes 6 from Chester Ballard of the 37th Mass., and Crayton Sturtwant from Vermont, contents incl. descriptions of camp life incl. forced march on hot day when 25 men died from sun stroke, etc., also this comment: "I see no prospect of any rest. The Rebs have a small mounted force which they move around very rapidly and all the cavalry we have is green and no good wherever they discover a Reb picket they report 40 or 5000 Johnies" etc., many with original envelopes including patriotics (nice Ellsworth postmarked in Hartford July 4, 1861 with magenta "Free" etc.), Fine group

E. 250-350
350
Back to Top
485
 
Union Soldiers' Correspondence. 27 letters form a Michigan soldier to his wife, all with original envelopes, most are pre-war or the summer of 1865 (stationed in Nashville), includes good letter devoted to describing a train which went off a bridge 35 feet high ("one car containing 30 Negroes went down and not one was known to have escaped the water was about 10 feet deep the Passenger car stood nearly on end," etc.), one letter from Union lines outside Atlanta discusses the mens' support of Lincoln in `64 election, love letters etc., includes tintype of infant, Fine group

E. 400-500
575
Back to Top
486
 
The Waldo Correspondence. Includes 65 letters, many from Alfred Edward of the 35th Reg., Mass. Vols., the earliest notes that Mosby has been in the area "so I suppose that Gen. Lee will know of our joining the army,", accounts of Fredericksburg, Vicksburg and a 24pp manuscript "The Siege of Knoxville or Life in the Rifle Pits" written Nov. 1863. Alfred E. had one arm amputated in June, 1864- 3 letters follow the decline of his health, ending with a letter from his mother describing his last hours, lot includes scarce telegraph envelope PEOPLE'S TELEGRAPH LINE, with matching enclosure, small broadside with list of drafted men, also news clippings, several printed notices (Sanitary Comm., 9th Army Corp, etc.), many letters with original envelopes, a Fine and very desirable group

E. 1,500-2,000
2,400
Back to Top
486A
 
The War in Richmond: The Correspondence of Carrie & Joseph Young. Approx. 56 letters, 26 war-dated (1861-62), from this couple living in Richmond, and other famly members. Joseph Young was a Richmond journalist; during the war he was a member of Col. Thomas Evan's regiment in Richmond, continuing to write accounts of life in the capital; many of the pre-war letters are to his wife, some excellent political content, many of the war letters are from Carrie to her parents, including this April 17th letter: "Lincoln...demanded 3000 soldiers of Virginia of course she will not send any to cut her own throat. Lincoln has made the same demand of Maryland. She neither will comply. Washington is under martial government every road and avenue leading to the city is gaurded by soldiers. Lincoln in all calls for 75000 men just to think of such a body of soliders. he is a deep plotting grand rascal. I trust they may get his `head.' Fort Sumter is taken by the southern government without the loss of a single man on their side...The secession Flag now waves over the fort. There is no other but scesesion Flags here now. every body is for scession...The very day old Lincoln took his seat it commenced to rain and has been raining ever since..." etc., other letters mention loss of servants, scarcity of food, description of a man struck by lightning, mention of battles, "Richmond is crammed and jammed with wounded soldiers," etc., also one superb 5 page letter from Joseph mentioning Generals Jackson, McClellan, Wool, Burnside, etc., President Davis leaving Richmond with his family, Genl. Winder's regulation of country produce prices ("Turkeys strut the barnyards in defiance of city epicures, seemingly conscious of the fact that their owners have registered an oath never to decorate the markets with their presence.") etc., there is also a large group of pre-war letters (1858-1861) and 2 post-war letters (1867) with illustrated steamship letterheads, all with domestic details, includes cabinet photo of Carrie & Joseph taken by Davis of Richmond, CDV with hand-painted Confederate Flags (faulty but rare), etc. mixed condition but an fascinating group, newly discovered and offered for the first time

E. 750-1,000
1,800
Back to Top
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