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Sale 764A — Autographs and Historical Documents

Sale Date — Saturday, 10 December, 1994

Category — Civil War Letters

Lot
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
457
 
The Army of Northern Virginia Surrenders. Four page soldier's letter headed "Camp of the 111th Regt. N.Y.V. April the 10th, 1865," and which reads (in part): "General Lee and his army surrendered yesterday and if you had seen the men you would have thought they were crazy. The men threw their hats and yelled and the colors were waved and we had a noisy time. We were drawn up in line of battle along the road and stacked arms. After Lee had surrendered Genl. Meade rode along the lines laughing and bowing and every little ways he would say they have surrendered they have surrendered, then the boys would cheer I do not think that we will have any more fighting" etc., fresh and Very Fine

E. 200-250
300
457A
 
Captured Lincoln Stationery Used in Richmond. Magee lettersheet, "The Fence that Uncle Abe built", datelined "Richmond July 10 (1862), containing 4 letters from "Carrie" and "J. Rich" to various family members, fine contents showing the hardships of the war, her daughter described as a "perfect skeleton," mention of friends recovering from wounds, echoes of the Seven Days battles, "nothing but starvation do I see. I run the Blockade most every day to Richmond...I must stop as you will not be able to understand this speling as I am crazy." etc. The last line notes, "this letter is written on a sheet of yankee paper, taken off the battle field, also the envelope [no longer extant]", age stains at folds, still Fine, very rare use of "captured" stationery with the portrait of Lincoln not defaced in any way

E. 300-400
475
Back to Top
458
 
Confederate Letters. Group of 9,includes 4 to Carrie Fries from Dr. G.F. Shaffner, an army surgeon with excellent contents, battle news from Manassas with description of shell cutting off head of Beauregard's horse, capture of artillery pieces and ammunition; execution of fellow soldiers ("The criminals are said to have showed great marked indifference, and met death calmly and with bravery. Tis a sad picture but has no doubt proven a wholesome lesson to their comrades,"), description of man treated for epileptic fit ("I bled him almost to fainting, taking a full quart, which relieve him very much,"); tearing up railroad track ("damage of probably -1/2 million to Lincoln"); 2 loving letters 1862-63), from Carrie to the doctor, one 1866 letter from her mother, and 1 unrelated letter from soldier in Richmond; several with original envelopes including "Company Shopes N.C." cds and "Paid 10" and No. 6 pair from Winchester Va. with additional "Due 10" in ms., some separations at folds, still Fine, readable and important group

E. 400-500
500
Back to Top
459
 
Confederate Prisoners at Castle Thunder. Dec. 14, 1863 letter from Richmond to N.C. Governor Z.B. Vance signed by 6 Confederate soldiers: "who has disobeyed the law by Being Absent from our Cos. But yet Give up ourselves to report to our regts was arrested and are still under arrest and now Desire A reprieve from you so we can report to our commands," etc., on back is ANS from Vance to Genl. Winder: "If these men are not old offenders & did come in voluntarily, I hope they may be pardoned & sent today." With bold signature of the governor, and original envelope sent by Vance to Maj. E. Griswold Provost Marshall (marked "O.B."), Fine

E. 200-250
260
Back to Top
460
 
Confederate Souvenirs from A Skirmish. 4pp letter from member of Union cavalry camped "-1/2 mile from Shephardstown Va. Aug. 23rd 1864", he tells his mother that he "took a fellow prisoner from the 4[th] Va. Cavalry his name was James Hulfish I got a very nice revolver from him it is a six shooter if I get where I can I will Express it home he also gave me a nice pair of spurs the Revolver had Six loads in it & he could have shot me but I rode up to him, raised my sabre over his head & told him I would cut him down & he handed me his arms & I took him back our Regt. took about 200 Prisoners" etc. Fine

E. 150-200
135
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461
 
The Death of Lincoln, Sherman's March and Some Other Observations. Two letters to R.G. Ardrey of the 111th Reg., Ill. vols., from a friend (Apr. 19, 1865) and his brother & mother (Apr. 21st) in Lively Grove, Ill.: "You will have no doubt heard ere this comes to hand of the assassination of our dear & Respected president by some of those incarnate Deavils [sic] that are hatched and brooded in dixey I hope that Jef. Davis may be caught with some others and savaged in the same way in retaliation...We hard A Johnson has been inaugerated [sic] but we lack confidence in him since the 4th of Mar it is said he has been drinking hard We were not quite satisfied with the terms of liberalality [sic] that was given to Lee and his army," etc. The 2nd letter says (in part): "I was glad to here that you were all well after so long a march through so much water you say that some of the boys say that the next generation of Yanks will be web-footed...Shermans march has been very successful I see by yesterday papers that Johnston has surrendered to him I think that the Rebellion is gon up the spout & down again the whole North as one outburst of Joy at the success of our army the cannon in all directions was in perpetual roar the blacksmiths had throwed down their hammers and turned their anvils into cannon every flag was thrown to the breeze in a Nations Joy Saturday last was to have been a day of rejoicing by order of the Governors of the several states But hark on that morning when the people had partly assembled the telegraph brought the news that the President had fell by the assassins bullet the roar of cannon hushed the people all looked as though they had lost a near & dear Friend there was the grat contrast from extreme joy to extreme grief that the nation ever experienced," etc., each with original envelope with 3c Rose (65) and four-line military address (Sherman's Army), excellent pair of letters

E. 300-400
230
Back to Top
462
 
The Funeral of President Lincoln. Two page letter dated Apr. 18, 1865, with Christian Commission letterhead, from a Mr. S.D. Richardson to his wife: "I designed to go directly home but was overpersuaded by some Delegates of the Commission to go to Washington with them and so be there at the funeral of Pres. Lincoln. So I am here. I do not expect to see him, and indeed I have no particular desire to, for I had rather retain in my memory the appearance of that noble man, as I last saw him at his inauguration, at his own mansion, and at church, than to see him in death. There is a great crowd here, and there will be many disappointed ones." etc., with original envelope with matching corner card and 3c Rose (65) tied by Washington postmark, Very Fine

E. 150-200
0
Back to Top
463
 
Heroes of Successful Expeditions. Multicolor Magnus lettersheet with portraits of Porter, Butler and Farragut, headed Camp Kerney, Oct. 25, 1862 from Pa. sargeant telling his cousin he has an opportunity to become a 1st Sgt. in a cavalry regiment, Fine, very scarce in used condition

E. 200-250
170
Back to Top
463A
 
A Kentuckian Proclaims His Loyalty to the Union. Excellent 4-page letter headed White Hall June 3, 1861: "In these perilous times it becomes us to preserve all the friendships we can. Though living in a section of the country in some danger of becoming hostile to the gov`t. I still retain the friendly feelings I ever had toward those living North. We of Kentucky do not intend to have Kentucky particpated into the awful vortex of secession and armed rebellion against the Stars & Stripes. For we regard them as our only protection and guarntee against anarchy and tryranny," etc., with original envelope with blue "Lou. & Fran. & Lex. & Fran. R.R." cds tying No. 26 (partial strike), Fine, important contents

E. 200-250
220
Back to Top
464
 
Letters from Occupied New Orleans. Three letters from Harry Clifford of trhe 87th Ill. Vols., mentions, "...a soldier of the 24th Ind. shot by a negro here day before yesterday the negro was put in jail the boys of the 24th went up at night to the jail and mobbed the jail and demanded the negro the commander of the jail said he would give the negro up in the morning...last I heard of him he was to tied to a stake and burned," etc., praises Genl. Logan and hopes he'll run for President, helps capture 150 rebels while scouting, well digging by Board of Health, etc., all with original envelopes, Very Fine contents

E. 150-200
210
Back to Top
465
 
[Missouri Compromise]. 5pp., 8 x 10 in., undated letter signed by Andrews Parsons, governor of Michigan, 1853-55. responding to a committee asking for his opinions on their protest against a repeal of the Missouri Compromise in 1854, saying (in part): "The institution of Slavery tolerated in the Southern States (to my mind revolting in the extreme) is an institution for which Michigan and other free States are no more responsible than for the laws of England which acknowlege the Queen's Divine right of sovreignty...If Congress has power to establish an arbitrary line beyond which Slavery shall not go, it also must have power to establish a line to which it may go...Let the People of every State & Territory take the responsibility which justly belongs to them of making rules for their internal regulations- enjoy their benefits and suffer the consequences. To do so would prevent a continual dragging before Congress of their love of contention which as so often aroused there and throughout the whole country a spirit that has seriously threatened the disolution of Union. It is greatly regretted that philanthropists have so much mistaken the way to benefit the Slave. Their efforts & contentions generally well designed have been upon unconstitutional and anti republican grounds, and in every conflict they have lost much and gained nothing...The chains of slavery are at this time heavier and stronger than they were twenty five years ago...I must therefore hold that the General Government should be guiltless of sanctioning slavery in the Territories." etc., Fine

E. 1,000-1,500
750
Back to Top
466
c
Slavery and the Trent Affair. Two letters from England to Paterson, N.J., first is Nov. 14, 1861: "...the people of England or a majority of them are very strong abolitionists and they are in favor of North, when Fremont issued his proclamation respecting the slaves in Missouri a voice of approbation went up, but when Lincoln signified his wish that it should be modified it was turned almost to ridicule...No! no! it can't be, abolish slavery, then, boast of your freedom, they are also anxious that a blow should be struck," etc.; the 2nd is a Dec. 27, 1861: "...I have sent you what the people of this country think about the Rebellion and also what they think of the Trent affair, the feeling ran very high at the time and is quiet at present as they have wasted their vocabulary until the President's reply comes I hope that there will not be any War for the sake of the people of the two countrys for trade is very dull here business of all kinds is suffering from the Rebellion hundreds of people are out of work and a large number of factories in Lancashire are running short time, what! will it be when war breaks out? but it is hoped that the reply will be favorable to he demand sent out by this government," etc., accompanied by original envelopes, each franked with Great Britain 1sh Green (28), Fine

E. 200-250
220
Back to Top
467
c
Texas Soldier's Letters. Two, 4-1/2pp, Mar. 21 & 31, 1862, interesting contents from a Sgt. Jones wishing to raise a "a company of Mounted Men for the War", each with original envelopes postmarked Galveston Tex. with double circle datestamp, "5" hs (unpaid) and soldier's endorsement, Fine

E. 200-250
950
Back to Top
468
 
Union Feelings in Philadelphia. Two letters in Apr. 1861, describing men wearing red white & blue cravats, threatening to burn college for not flying the Union flag, etc., includes tiny drawing of a lizard presumably copied from a anti-secession envelope- the 2nd letter contains a cruder version of it; Fine

E. 100-150
75
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