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74 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 8

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=Back-of-Book, Issue/Country=Air Post, All Sale Dates thru 2022/01/01, Catalogue = C3a, Symbol IN ("H")
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Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
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Symbol
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2020-06-30
2020 Rarities of the World
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Sale Number 1224, Lot Number 223, 1918 24c Inverted "Jenny" -- Position 11 (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 11, original gum, deep rich colors, some slight natural wrinkling, small thin spot at bottom right

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY. THIS STAMP OFFERED TO THE MARKET FOR THE FIRST TIME IN DECADES.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here -- Position 11 -- was first offered at auction in the March 21, 1929, sale of the Joseph A. Steinmetz collection, with the left sheet selvage intact. Steinmetz was a prominent aerophilatelist and Philadelphia businessman who participated in the original transaction involving the sale of the sheet. It next appeared in a 1947 Cosmos Stamp Co. auction, with selvage removed. It then appeared in a May 11, 1965, H. R. Harmer auction of the Ellwood Burdsall collection. It was next offered in a January 29, 1977, Jacques C. Schiff auction, where it was acquired by the current owner, Ronald D. Bassey, a prominent attorney and CPA from Michigan.

Ex Col. Green, Steinmetz and Burdsall. With 1973 and 2020 P.F. certificates

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners' biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com

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215,000
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2020-03-03
United States Stamps
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Sale Number 1217, Lot Number 1229, The 1918 24c Inverted Jenny, Position 9524c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 95, slightly disturbed original gum, partly regummed at left covering small thins, rich colors, better centering than many in the sheet of 100, showing part of vertical centerline at right, small toned spots at right and natural diagonal crease

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY. THIS STAMP WAS ORIGINALLY PART OF THE PLATE NUMBER AND ARROW BLOCK OF EIGHT AND THEN WAS PART OF THE UNIQUE BOTTOM ARROW PAIR.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here -- Position 95 -- was first offered at auction in a November 1944 sale of the Colonel Green collection as part of the unique plate number and arrow block of eight. The plate block of eight was purchased at the Green sale by dealer Y. Souren, acting as agent for noted collector Amos Eno, heir to a New York real estate fortune. Eno broke the block of eight into the unique plate block of four, a bottom arrow pair, and two singles. The bottom arrow pair was offered in the 1955 H. R. Harmer auction of the Lieutenant Colonel Donald L. Harvey collection, where it was purchased by Jack E. Molesworth, a Boston dealer.

Since this stamp's 1955 auction appearance, the gum has been inaccurately described, which has been corrected in this sale and on the accompanying P.F. certificate. Molesworth divided the pair soon after the 1955 auction and removed the bottom sheet selvage from this stamp. Its first auction appearance as a single was in a May 3, 1966, Corinphila auction in Zurich, where it was described as "good centering and impeccable" with two stars, denoting original-gum condition. It was submitted to the P.F. in 1971 and certificate 36662 was issued, stating it was "regummed covering thinning at left," with a few stains and a diagonal crease. The stamp was offered in a November 18, 1971, Jacques C. Schiff auction, where it was described with "disturbed original gum or possibly regummed." It made another appearance in a Schiff sale on March 11, 1973, with the same description and was acquired by Martin Sellinger, either at that sale or subsequently. Sellinger's name appears on the 1996 P.F. certificate. The stamp was later acquired by the current owner.

When Molesworth bought this stamp as part of the arrow pair in the 1955 auction, it already had thin spots at left from improper handling, most likely by Col. Green. We believe Molesworth decided to improve the appearance of the stamp by taking a small amount of gum from another stamp and applying it to a small area over the thin spots. When the P.F. described it in 1971 as “regummed covering thinning at left,” the wording implied that the stamp was completely regummed, which is incorrect. This wording was repeated on the 1996 certificate (issued to Sellinger) and remained in the record until 2019, when the current owner consigned the stamp to Siegel Auction Galleries. This was the first time we had an opportunity to physically examine the stamp, and it was obvious that the gum was original, with a slight disturbance and a small amount of non-original gum covering the thin spots. The Philatelic Foundation concurred and in 2019 issued their revised opinion stating “slightly disturbed original gum, partly regummed at left covering small thins”. Therefore, this stamp has been rightly returned to the original-gum category where it has always belonged.

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green, Amos Eno, Lieut. Col. Donald L. Harvey and Martin Sellinger. With 2019 P.F. certificate

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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2019-06-26
2019 Rarities of the World
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Sale Number 1205, Lot Number 2111, 1918 Inverted Jenny Position 13 (Scott C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 13, slightly disturbed original gum, brilliant colors, small thin spots

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY. THIS COPY WAS LONG THOUGHT LOST AND IS OFFERED AT AUCTION FOR ONLY THE SECOND TIME SINCE EUGENE KLEIN BROKE APART THE SHEET SHORTLY AFTER ITS DISCOVERY.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

Position 13, offered here, was long thought lost to philately before it surfaced and was sold by the Siegel firm in our 2007 Rarities of the World sale (Sale 937, lot 285). It was consigned by the estate of Robert B. Honeyman Jr., a prominent collector of stamps, books and manuscripts who had acquired the Jenny privately many years earlier.

Ex Colonel Edward H.R. Green and Robert B. Honeyman Jr. With 2007 P.F. certificate.

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners’ biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com

450,000
220,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2018-06-27
2018 Rarities of the World
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Sale Number 1185, Lot Number 91, Inverted Jenny Positions 15 and 624c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 15, the fifth stamp from the left in the second row of the sheet, original gum, deep rich colors, tiny thin spot just below the plane, faint traces of purple ink above the bottom left "24"

FINE-VERY FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here -- Position 15 -- was owned by John H. Clapp, scion of a wealthy Pennsylvania oil family. He passed away in 1940 and shortly afterward his entire stamp collection was sold to dealer Spencer Anderson for $100,000. Soon after, Anderson, whose pencil initials appear on the back, sold the Inverted Jenny to Louise Hoffman for a reported price of $2,500. Hoffman formed an important Air Post collection and held her Inverted Jenny for the next two decades. The stamp was included in the sale of her collection in 1966, where it realized $9,000, selling to Robert A. Siegel, who was likely acting as an agent for collector Dr. Drew B. Meilstrup. It next sold in the 1973 Siegel auction of the Meilstrup collection to an anonymous buyer. It has made only three other auction appearances since 1973, selling in 1997 to dealer Irwin Weinberg. The purple ink marks were not present when it was offered in 1997.

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green, John H. Clapp, Spencer Anderson (dealer), Louise Hoffman and Dr. Drew B. Meilstrup. Pencil "15" position number (written by Eugene Klein on all 100 positions) and "SA" (Spencer Anderson) initials on back. With 2010 P.F. certificate

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners’ biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com

450,000
270,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2018-06-27
2018 Rarities of the World
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Sale Number 1185, Lot Number 92, Inverted Jenny Positions 15 and 624c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 6, the sixth stamp from the left in the top row of the sheet, showing full guideline at left, original gum, rich colors, reperfed straight edge at top -- this was done after the 1942 Colonel Green auction and before its appearance in a 1951 Sylvester Colby auction -- tiny thinning at bottom, light gum crease not mentioned on accompanying certificates

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. AN ATTRACTIVE EXAMPLE OF THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY..

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here -- Position 6 -- was one of the straight-edge examples from Colonel Green's sheet which he still owned at the time of his death (several straight-edge copies were found in an envelope stuck together and soaked apart, losing their gum -- this was not). It was first offered in Sale 2 in the series of auctions of the Colonel Green collection (Laurence & Stryker, October 5-8, 1942, lot 1324, described with original gum). The catalogue photo shows the straight edge at top, and it was described as having a light 16mm corner crease and thin trace in bottom right corner perforation. It realized $1,350 (a Harvard education cost $420 that year). It next appeared in a 1951 Sylvester Colby auction, with perforations at the top and no mention of the reperfing. Its history for the next 20 years is not documented. In 1972, according to Stamp of the Century, by Kellen Diamanti and Deborah Fisher, Position 6 was sold to coin dealer Steven C. Markoff, of A-Mark Financial Corporation, by another coin dealer named Ray Lundgren, who operated Century Stamp & Coin and founded the Long Beach Coin & Stamp Exposition in 1964. In 1976, after agreeing to testify in two stamp theft cases, Lundgren was shot four times at point blank range by members of Whitey Bulger's Winter Hill Gang, who were behind the thefts and used Lundgren to fence the property.

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green and Steven C. Markoff (A-Mark Financial Corporation). With 1979, 1995 and 2010 P.F. certificates.

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners’ biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com

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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2018-04-11
The David Wingate Collection of United States Stamps
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Sale Number 1180, Lot Number 408, 1918 24c Inverted Jenny, Position 86 (Scott C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 86, the sixth stamp in the eighth row of the sheet of 100 purchased by William T. Robey at the post office on May 14, 1918, accompanying certificate notes "mount glazed o.g." which is really very minor, unusually choice centering with wide and balanced margins, vertical guideline visible along left perforations, light pencil "86" notation on gum as always, deep rich colors, natural gum bend as normally seen in this part of the sheet which was described on 1981 P.F. certificate as "minor diagonal crease" and which was not described at all on 1989 P.F. certificate

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST-CENTERED EXAMPLES OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY. A TRULY REMARKABLE STAMP.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here -- Position 86 -- was first offered at auction in a November 1944 sale of the Colonel Green collection as part of the unique plate number and arrow block of eight. The plate block of eight was purchased at the Green sale by dealer Y. Souren acting as agent for noted collector Amos Eno, heir to a New York real estate fortune. Eno broke the block of eight into the unique plate block of four, a bottom arrow pair, and two singles. This stamp was offered as a single in the 1950 auction of the Eno collection. Its next appearance at auction was in the 1999 Siegel sale of the “Argentum’ collection, formed by long-time Weill client, Dr. James Alden Graves. It is likely that the Weills placed the stamp privately in one or more collections between the time it appeared in the 1950 Eno sale and the 1999 Siegel sale.

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green, Amos Eno and Dr. J. A. Graves (“Argentum”).

With 1981 and 1989 P.F. certificates.

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners’ biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com

450,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2017-06-27
2017 Rarities of the World
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Sale Number 1159, Lot Number 260, The Inverted Jenny, Position 60 (Scott C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 60, the tenth stamp in the sixth row of the sheet of 100 purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, original gum, lightly hinged, natural straight edge at right leaving ample white margin outside of the design, horizontal guideline visible along top perf tips, light pencil position number “60” notation on gum as always, deep rich colors that are truly intense -- this stamp has been kept out of light for the past 42 years -- and bright fresh paper

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. A BEAUTIFUL SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY. OFFERED TO THE MARKET FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE 1974.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies that Klein was unable to sell and returned to Colonel Green were found in Green’s estate stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here -- Position 60 -- was first offered at auction in an April 1946 sale of the Colonel Green collection as part of a pair with the stamp above, Position 50. It was purchased by noted dealer Warren H. Colson. The pair next appeared in a 1960 Daniel F. Kelleher sale, where it was purchased by Stanley J. Richmond, who then sold it privately to Robert A. Siegel.

Position 60 made its first appearance as a single in a 1968 Siegel auction. It was subsequently offered in the 1970 Siegel auction of the A. T. Seymour collection, where it was purchased by Greg Manning, who sold it to a California dealer. It was then offered in an April 1972 Corinphila auction in Switzerland (Sale 55, lot 5290), and later in the same year made another auction appearance at a Simmy’s Stamp Company sale in Boston. It was acquired by the current owner in a 1974 Siegel sale (Sale 459, lot 1196, realized $25,000 hammer versus $35,000 Scott Catalogue value).

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green and A. T. Seymour. With 1974 P.F. certificate.

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners’ biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com/

For a pdf of expanded description of Inverted Jenny go to https://siegelauctions.com/2017/1159/Pos60.pdf

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2017-05-11
The McCoy Inverted Jenny - Position 76
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Sale Number 1157, Lot Number 4000, The Ethel B. McCoy Inverted Jenny, Position 76 (Scott C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 76, the sixth stamp in the eighth row of the sheet of 100 purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, part original gum, rich colors, small thin spot, skillfully reperforated at top and left

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A STORIED AND ATTRACTIVE EXAMPLE OF THE LEGENDARY 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY THAT WAS KEPT OUT OF THE MARKET FOR SIX DECADES FOLLOWING THE THEFT OF THE McCOY BLOCK IN 1955.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail. The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

One of the blocks sold by Klein on behalf of Colonel Green comprised Positions 65-66/75-76 from the center two columns with a vertical guideline between the left and right stamps. This block was acquired by Arthur Hind, the world-renowned collector who bought the unique British Guiana One-Cent Magenta, reputedly outbidding King George V. In 1936, after Hind’s death, the block was purchased from New York dealer Spencer Anderson for $16,000 by Bert A. Stewart as a gift to his wife, Ethel Bergstresser Stewart McCoy (1893-1980). The full history of the McCoy block, including the story of its theft and ongoing recovery, is told by Ken Lawrence at https://siegelauctions.com/2017/1157/McCoy_By_Lawrence.pdf . This stamp is the lower right position in the McCoy block.

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green, Arthur Hind and Ethel Bergstresser Stewart McCoy. In 2016 it was certified by both The Philatelic Foundation and the American Philatelic Expertizing Service.

2016 Philatelic Foundation certificate (535711) states:

IT IS A GENUINE UNUSED SCOTT C3A, INVERTED CENTER, POSITION 76, THE BOTTOM RIGHT STAMP FROM THE ORIGINAL BLOCK OF FOUR BELONGING TO ETHEL B. MCCOY AND STOLEN FROM HER EXHIBIT ON SEPT. 23, 1955

THE INVERT, WITH PART O.G., A TINY THIN SPOT AT RIGHT, REPERFORATED AT TOP, AND ALSO REPERFORATED AT LEFT TO ELIMINATE THE VERTICAL GUIDE LINE APPEARING ON THE STAMP IN ITS ORIGINAL STATE.

2016 APEX certificate (218794) states:

United States, Scott No. C3a center inverted, Pos. 76, unused, original gum, previously hinged, genuine, thin, reperforated at top, also reperforated at left to remove guide line.

2017 Scott U.S. Specialized Catalogue Value $450,000.00

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners’ biographies, go to https://invertedjenny.com

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United States
U.S. Stamps
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Air Post
2017-05-11
United States Stamps
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Sale Number 1156, Lot Number 3779A, Air Post (C1-C15), For the McCoy Inverted Jenny, Position 76, see lot 4000 in separate auction catalog at https://siegelauctions.com/sales.php?sale_no=1157 .

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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2017-02-28
The Don David Price Collection of the U.S. 1918 24c Jenny
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Sale Number 1147, Lot Number 9, Inverted Jenny Position 2824c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 28, the eighth stamp in the third row of the sheet of 100 purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, original gum, lightly hinged, fresh and bright colors, attractive centering and margins

VERY FINE. A SOUND AND CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY THAT HAS NOT APPEARED AT AUCTION SINCE 1950.

The original sheet of one hundred Inverted Jenny errors was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, the first day the stamps went on sale in all three principal airmail route cities: Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia. Robey bought the sheet for its $24 face value at the New York Avenue Post Office window in the District of Columbia. On Sunday, May 19, Robey agreed to give Eugene Klein, a prominent Philadelphia stamp dealer, a one-day option to buy the sheet for $15,000. Klein exercised his option on Monday, May 20, in a late afternoon phone call, and he confirmed it with a registered letter to Robey sent in the evening mail (the letter from Klein is offered in this sale in lot 8). The sheet was delivered to Klein’s office by Robey and his father-in-law on the following day, Tuesday, May 21, 1918.

No later than Monday, May 20, the day Klein exercised his option, he had arranged to sell the sheet for $20,000 to Colonel Edward H. R. Green. Half of the $5,000 profit went to Klein’s partners, Percy McGraw Mann and Joseph A. Steinmetz. Klein was then authorized by Colonel Green to divide the sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks. It is possible to reconstruct the Inverted Jenny sheet with photographs of the singles and blocks (see the reconstruction at https://invertedjenny.com/salerecords ).

Despite the great rarity and value of Inverted Jenny stamps, many of the original hundred have been mistreated by collectors over the years. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Eight straight-edge copies, which Klein returned after he was unable to sell them, were found in Colonel Green’s estate, stuck together in an envelope (they were soaked and lost their gum). Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and one was physically Scotch-taped to an exhibit page. Another was nearly lost to philately forever when it was swept up in a vacuum cleaner. Finally, with the discovery of a third stamp from the stolen McCoy block -- recognized by The Philatelic Foundation’s expert staff when it was submitted by an auction firm -- only one purloined Inverted Jenny remains at large.

The stamp offered here -- Position 28 -- was first offered in auction at the June 1940 Harmer, Rooke sale of the George R. M. Ewing collection. It next appeared at auction in a February 1947 F. W. Kessler sale, consigned by Cuban dealer Alberto Perez. It then appeared in another Harmer, Rooke sale in 1949. The Price family acquired Position 28 on November 29, 1950, when Milton Price purchased the stamp at another Harmer, Rooke sale, consigned by E. E. Kistner. Milton Price was an avid collector of U.S. stamps from the 1930s through the 50s until he unexpectedly died in 1961. His collection of 19 Elbe albums was put into a vault until 1992, when it was dispersed and sold. Don David Price, Milton’s son, retained five of the stamps, including the Inverted Jenny Position 28. These five stamps formed the core of Don’s two renowned exhibits -- the Bi-Color stamp exhibit, which was sold by the Siegel firm in March 2016, and the Jenny exhibit, which is offered in this sale.

With photocopy of 1951 P.F. certificate issued to Milton Price and 2016 P.F. certificate, which states “Genuine, Previously Hinged”.

For the complete history and detailed records of every Inverted Jenny and owners' biographies, go to http://invertedjenny.com

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=Back-of-Book, Issue/Country=Air Post, All Sale Dates thru 2022/01/01, Catalogue = C3a, Symbol IN ("H")

74 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 8


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