Contact Siegel
6 West 48th Street
9th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Contact by phone:
New York: (212) 753-6421
Dallas: (214) 754-5991

56 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 6

Sort By 
FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=20th Century Issues, Issue/Country=20th Century Commemorative Issues, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 613
Area/Sub/
General/Issue
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2019-06-26
2019 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 1205, Lot Number 2107, 1916-22 and Later Issues2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Intense shade and impression, neat machine cancel leaves entire design clearly visible

FRESH AND VERY FINE EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL 20TH CENTURY ISSUES. ONLY 50 ARE RECORDED.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/613 , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the used strip of three, for a total of 50 stamps. Of the singles, 22 are confirmed as sound, but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine. The example offered here, with balanced margins and in sound condition, is highly desirable.

Census No. 613-CAN-02. From our 1980 Rarities sale. With 1995 and 2008 P.F. certificates

40,000
30,000
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2019-06-26
2019 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 1205, Lot Number 2108, 1916-22 and Later Issues2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Intense shade and impression, unobtrusive cancel leaves entire design clearly visible, sheet selvage at left with alignment dash

FRESH AND FINE EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL 20TH CENTURY ISSUES. ONLY 50 ARE RECORDED.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/613 , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the used strip of three, for a total of 50 stamps. Of the singles, 23 are confirmed as sound, but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine. The example offered here, with the sheet margin at left and in sound condition, is highly desirable. This is the only recorded Scott 613 with any type of marginal marking.

Census No. 613-CAN-22. With 1958 P.F. certificate issued to Robert A. Siegel

37,500
19,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2018-04-11
The David Wingate Collection of United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1180, Lot Number 394, Rotary Waste Rarities and Later Issues (Scott 594, 596, 613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Intense shade and impression, unobtrusive cancel leaves entire design clearly visible

FRESH AND FINE EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL 20TH CENTURY ISSUES. ONLY 50 ARE RECORDED.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/613 , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the used strip of three, for a total of 50 stamps. Of the singles, 22 are confirmed as sound, but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine. The example offered here, with three wide margins and in sound condition, is highly desirable.

Census No. 613-CAN-34. Ex Dr. Graves ("Argentum"). Signed in pencil by Weill. With 1987 P.F. certificate

40,000
19,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2017-06-27
2017 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 1159, Lot Number 254, 1925 and Later Issues2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Better centering than often seen for this rotary sheet waste issue, sharp impression, light machine cancel

FRESH AND FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our updated census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 43 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the used strip of three. Of the singles, 25 are sound, but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine.

Census No. 613-CAN-04. Ex McKinney and "Golden Oak." With 2002 P.F. certificate

40,000
18,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2017-03-01
United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1150, Lot Number 1101, 1922 and Later Issues2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Intense shade and impression, neat machine slogan cancel

FRESH AND FINE EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL 20TH CENTURY ISSUES.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the used strip of three. Of the singles, just over half are sound.

Census No. 613-CAN-21. Ex Carl W. Schedler (Siegel Sale 476, Sep. 10, 1975 where acquired by the current owner). With 1961 P.F. certificate.

40,000
15,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2016-11-09
U.S. Treasures of Philately from The Weinberg Inventory
 
Sale Number 1139, Lot Number 98, Washington-Franklin and Later Issues2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Horizontal strip of three comprising Positions 56-58 from the upper right pane of 100 of Plate 14867, choice centering with perforations completely clear of all three designs, deep shade, neat duplex cancel leaves outer stamps barely cancelled, lightly cleaned (shows only under ultraviolet light), single short perf at top of Position 58 mentioned on accompanying P.S.E. certificate, but not on P.F. certificate

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE UNIQUE STRIP OF THREE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11, WHICH IS THE LARGEST KNOWN MULTIPLE. ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT 20TH CENTURY MULTIPLES EXTANT, WHICH WAS DISCOVERED APPROXIMATELY TEN YEARS AGO.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate Perf 11 stamps (Scott 610) were issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the rotary press Perf 10 stamps (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp -- combining the rotary press printing with the perforation gauge used for the flat plate printing -- was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

For the first approximately 70 years that this issue was known, the largest multiples recorded were two pairs, one of which has been broken into two singles. The discovery of this strip by a Harding specialist created a sensation in the philatelic press before it was first auctioned by Matthew Bennett in 2007. In the process of expertizing the strip, the discoverer went to the National Postal Museum to study the eight proof sheets (3,200 stamps) pulled from the plates that were used for the rotary press printings. On the fifth sheet, the matching plating marks were discovered, proving that this multiple came from Positions 56-58 in the upper right pane of Plate 14867 -- a plate that was used only for rotary press printings.

Our updated census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and this unique used strip of three.

Census No. 613-CAN-STR-01. With 2007 P.F. and P.S.E. certificates (the latter transposing two digits of the plate number)

130,000
32,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2016-10-06
The Hanover Collection of Superb-Quality U.S. Stamps-Part 2
 
Sale Number 1138, Lot Number 1694, 1922-29 and Later Issues (Scott 594-642)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Well-centered with unusually wide margins for this printing, sharp impression, bold wavy-line machine cancel

FRESH AND VERY FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11. ONE OF ONLY A FEW SOUND EXAMPLES WHERE THE PERFORATIONS DO NOT TOUCH THE DESIGN.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the used strip of three. Of the singles, 26 are sound, but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine.

Census No. 613-CAN-07. Ex Bettin, Stollnitz, "Connoisseur" and "Scarsdale". With 1976 S.P.A. certificate. With 1977, 1992 and 2004 P.F. certificates. Scott Catalogue value is based on grade of Fine.

40,000
30,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2016-09-14
The Alan Collection of United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1134, Lot Number 463, 1922-29 and Later Issues (Scott 551-679)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Intense shade, neat wavy-lines machine cancel, three wide and balanced margins, perfs just barely in at left

FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the recently-discovered used strip of three. Of the singles, 20 are sound (nine need to be reexamined for condition), but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine. The sound example offered here is very desirable.

Census No. 613-CAN-42. With 2006 P.F. certificate

40,000
18,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2015-04-28
The Robert R. Hall Collection of Outstanding United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1096, Lot Number 800, 1922-29  and Later Issues (Scott 551-679)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). With top sheet selvage, bright shade and crisp impression, neat wavy-line machine cancel

FRESH AND FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11.

Warren G. Harding, the 29th President, died in San Francisco on August 2, 1923, during a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding". Several people suggested a Harding memorial stamp, printed in black, and it was rushed into production. The first flat plate printing (Scott 610) was issued on September 1, 1923, in his home town of Marion, Ohio, followed less than two weeks later by the normal Perf 10 rotary press printing (Scott 612) on September 12.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 45 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and the recently-discovered used strip of three. Of the singles, 26 are sound, but of these only six rate a grade of Very Fine or Extremely Fine.

Census No. 613-CAN-45. With copy of 1998 P.F. certificate for pair (this is the right stamp).

40,000
17,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2015-02-23
The Curtis Collection: U.S. 20th Century and Air Post
 
Sale Number 1093, Lot Number 557, 1923 and Later Issues (Scott 578-834a)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613), 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613)2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Four margins, sharp impression, unobtrusive machine cancel, small corner crease at top right

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL 20TH CENTURY ISSUES.

Our census of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11, available at our website at www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/613/613.pdf , records 43 used singles (one faintly cancelled, if at all), one used pair and a strip of three.

The 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamp was discovered in 1938 by Leslie Lewis of the New York firm, Stanley Gibbons Inc. Gary Griffith presents his hypothesis in United States Stamps 1922-26 that rotary-printed sheets of 400 were first reduced to panes of 100 and then fed through the 11-gauge perforating machine normally used for flat plate sheets. This method distinguishes sheet-waste stamps -- Scott 544, 596 and 613 -- from the coil-waste stamps and explains the existence of a straight-edge on Scott 613.

Census No. 613-CAN-13. This is the right stamp from the second pair in the Usticke photo of the Gibbons find. With 1956 and 1992 P.F. certificates

40,000
18,000
Back to Top
FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=20th Century Issues, Issue/Country=20th Century Commemorative Issues, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 613

56 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 6


Copyright 2019. All rights reserved by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. Information and images may be used with credit to Siegel Auction Galleries or siegelauctions.com subject to guidelines and restrictions.
Website Terms of Use and Privacy Policy