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13 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 2

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=20th Century Issues, Issue/Country=20th Century Commemorative Issues, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 596
Area/Sub/
General/Issue
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2018-04-11
The David Wingate Collection of United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1180, Lot Number 393, Rotary Waste Rarities and Later Issues (Scott 594, 596, 613)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596). With "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, fine impression, well-centered for this difficult issue with perfs clear all around, completely sound

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF SCOTT 596, WHICH IS ONE OF THE RAREST STAMPS IN ALL OF UNITED STATES PHILATELY. ONLY 15 ARE RECORDED, AND ONLY FOUR ARE CONFIRMED AS SOUND.

The discovery of the stamp that would eventually become Scott 596, was announced in an article in the Bureau Specialist by Max Johl, who in the same article announced the discovery of a 1c Washington design (Scott 544). A third rotary press rarity, the 2c Harding (Scott 613), would not be discovered for another two years. Scott 596 is a slightly taller design than both the flat plate printing and the rotary coil waste printing, or Scott 594, due to the direction it was rolled around the rotary press printing cylinder. The "tall stamp" was considered to be a variety of Scott 594, the "wide" Rotary Perf 11; it was given its own Scott number in 1963.

All three issues (Scott 544, 596 and 613) were rotary sheet waste perforated 11 in both directions on the flat plate perforating machine. It is unclear whether they were produced at the same time. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of Scott 596, available at our website at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/596 , records fifteen stamps, all used or precancelled. None are graded above a 70. Only five of the thirteen have postal cancels, and only one of these is completely sound (number 1, realized $190,000 hammer in our 2009 Whitman sale). Only three precancelled copies are confirmed as sound (numbers 10, 11 and 13). Two others have not been seen since 1969 and 1971 (numbers 3 and 6) so their condition has not been verified. Therefore, only one postally cancelled and three precancelled copies are confirmed as sound.

Census No. 596-CAN-11. Ex Peyton ("Isleham") and McNall. With 1964, 1992 and 1994 P.F. certificates. This is the first we have offered since 2012. Scott Retail with postal cancel is $175,000.00. Scott Retail with Bureau precancel

130,000
190,000
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2012-09-20
The Natalee Grace Collection of Used U.S. Stamps, Part Three
 
Sale Number 1028, Lot Number 479, 1922-25 Coil and Sheet Waste Issues (Scott 594-596)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596). Light wavy-line machine cancel, deep shade, remarkably well-centered for this difficult rotary sheet waste stamp with perfs clear all around, insignificant corner perf crease at top right which does not detract from its appearance in any way

VERY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE THIRTEEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF SCOTT 596 AND ONE OF ONLY FIVE EXAMPLES WITHOUT A PRECANCEL. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The discovery of the stamp that would eventually become Scott 596, was announced in an article in the Bureau Specialist by Max Johl, who in the same article announced the discovery of a 1c Washington design (Scott 544). A third rotary press rarity, the 2c Harding (Scott 613), would not be discovered for another two years. Scott 596 is a slightly taller design than both the flat plate printing and the rotary coil waste printing, or Scott 594, due to the direction it was rolled around the rotary press printing cylinder. The "tall stamp" was considered to be a variety of Scott 594, the "wide" Rotary Perf 11; it was given its own Scott number in 1963.

All three issues (Scott 544, 596 and 613) were rotary sheet waste perforated 11 in both directions on the flat plate perforating machine. It is unclear whether they were produced at the same time. Production quality and quantity was very low, due to the rotary press stamps' natural tendency to curl, and the use of the flat plate perforator for the slightly different-sized rotary printing.

Our census of Scott 596, illustrated below and available at our website at http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/596/596.pdf , records thirteen used stamps. None is recorded unused. Only five of the thirteen have regular cancels. Of the non-precancelled stamps, two have major faults and one has poor centering. The stamp offered here and one other (Census No. 596-CAN-01) are the only two well-centered non-precancelled examples in existence.

Census No. 596-CAN-02. Ex Clifford Cole and Zoellner. With 1966 P.F. certificate.

175,000
90,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2012-06-26
2012 Rarities of the World
235°
PSE 70
 
Sale Number 1025, Lot Number 235, Rotary Perf 11 Issues (Scott 544, 596, 613)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596). Bold "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, crisp impression, completely sound

VERY FINE FOR THIS ROTARY WASTE ISSUE. ONLY THIRTEEN EXAMPLES ARE RECORDED, AND EIGHT OF THESE HAVE THE KANSAS CITY PRECANCEL. ONE OF THE GREATEST RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continuously applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their flat plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there was some leading or trailing paper that was too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject sheets. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Our updated census of Scott 596 (http://siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/596/596.pdf) records thirteen used stamps. There are no known unused examples. Eight are precancelled at Kansas City Mo.

Census No. 596-CAN-10. With 1994 and 2002 P.F. certificates and 2009 P.S.E. certificate (F 70; SMQ $170,000.00)

125,000
105,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2009-06-13
2009 Rarities of the World
228°
PSE 70
 
Sale Number 973, Lot Number 228, Later Issues (Scott 482A thru 1610c)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596). Bold "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, crisp impression, completely sound

VERY FINE FOR THIS ROTARY WASTE ISSUE. ONLY THIRTEEN EXAMPLES ARE RECORDED, AND EIGHT OF THESE HAVE THE KANSAS CITY PRECANCEL. ONE OF THE GREATEST RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continuously applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their flat plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there was some leading or trailing paper that was too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject sheets. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Our updated census of Scott 596 (http://siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/596/596.pdf) records thirteen used stamps. There are no known unused examples. Eight are precancelled at Kansas City Mo.

Census No. 596-CAN-10. With 1994 and 2002 P.F. certificates and 2009 P.S.E. certificate (F 70; SMQ $170,000.00)

170,000
0
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2009-09-22
The Alan B. Whitman Collection, Part Three: 1902-34 Issues, B-O-B
 
Sale Number 968B, Lot Number 741, Rotary Press Perforated 11 Rarities (Scott 594, 596 and 613)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary, Perf 11 (596). Neat wavy-line machine cancel, remarkably well-centered for this difficult issue with perfs well clear of design on all sides, deep rich color

VERY FINE FOR THIS ROTARY WASTE ISSUE. THIS STAMP IS WIDELY REGARDED AS THE FINEST EXAMPLE OF THE ONE-CENT FRANKLIN ROTARY PERF 11, SCOTT 596, WITHOUT PRECANCEL. ONLY THIRTEEN EXAMPLES ARE RECORDED, AND OF THESE ONLY FIVE ARE WITHOUT A PRECANCEL. ONE OF THE GREATEST RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continuously applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their ?at plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there was some leading or trailing paper that was too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject plates. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Our updated census of Scott 596 (http://siegelauctions.com/enc/census/596.pdf) records thirteen used stamps. There are no known unused examples. Eight are precancelled at Kansas City Mo. Of the five non-precancelled stamps, two have major faults. The stamp offered here is considered to be the best of the three non-precancelled copies without major faults.

This stamp was essentially “discovered” by the Weills and Clyde Jennings when they noticed that the dimensions differed from Scott 594, the other Rotary Perf 11 waste issue. The story is told in Opinions, published by The Philatelic Foundation. The stamp was sold in our 1982 Rarities sale and eventually entered the “Westport” collection formed by the Weills for a midwestern client. When the Westport collection was sold at auction by Christie’s, this stamp was acquired by a Texas collector. That collection was sold privately a few years ago, and Alan Whitman acquired the stamp through Sonny Hagendorf (Columbian Stamp Co.). Therefore, this is only the third time this stellar rarity of 20th Century United States philately has been offered at public auction since its discovery nearly a half-century ago.

With 1962 and 2005 P.F. certificates

130,000
190,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2008-05-08
The Jay Hoffman Collection of United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 956, Lot Number 522, 1917-23 Issues (Scott 596 and 613)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596). Bold "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, fine impression, small thin spot at bottom right

FINE APPEARANCE. A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE THE ONE-CENT FRANKLIN ROTARY PERF 11 ISSUE, SCOTT 596, WHICH IS ONE OF THE KEYS TO A COMPLETE COLLECTION OF UNITED STATES STAMPS.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continually applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their flat plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there was some leading or trailing paper that was too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject plates. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Scott 596 is waste from a vertical rotary press printing used to make sheet stamps -- a fact proven by the existence of precancelled copies such as the example offered here.

Our updated census of Scott 596 published in our Zoellner sale (and available at our web site at: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/census/596/596.htm) records thirteen used stamps. Of these, eight are precancelled at Kansas City Mo. There are no known unused examples.

Census No. 596-CAN-12. Ex Lessin. With 2002 P.F. certificate

110,000
85,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2002-05-18
2002 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 846, Lot Number 2338, 1922-29 and Later Issues1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596). Bold "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, fine impression, well-centered for this difficult issue

VERY FINE AND CHOICE SOUND COPY OF SCOTT 596. AMONG THE FINEST OF THE THIRTEEN RECORDED EXAMPLES, OF WHICH ONLY EIGHT ARE SOUND. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continually applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their flat plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there was some leading or trailing paper that was too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject plates. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Scott 596 is waste from a vertical rotary press printing used to make sheet stamps -- a fact proven by the existence of precancelled copies such as the example offered here.

Our updated census of Scott 596 published in our Zoellner sale (and available at our web site at: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/census/596/596.htm) records thirteen used stamps. Of these, eight are precancelled at Kansas City Mo. There are no known unused examples.

Census No. 596-CAN-13. This example of Scott 596 was not known to us at the time of the Zoellner sale and is being offered to the market for the first time. Illustrated and described in the December 1962 issue of The Precancel Forum. With 1962 Precancel Stamp Society certificate.

55,000
95,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
2000-05-13
2000 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 338, Rotary Perf 11 Rarities (504, 596, 613)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596). Bold "Kansas City Mo." Bureau precancel, dark shade and rich color, fine impression, well-centered for this difficult stamp with perfs clear all around

VERY FINE AND CHOICE SOUND COPY OF SCOTT 596. AMONG THE FINEST OF THE TWELVE RECORDED EXAMPLES, OF WHICH ONLY SEVEN ARE SOUND. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

The Rotary Perf 11 rarities (Scott 544, 594, 596 and 613) were created during an attempt by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing to salvage waste from the end of the paper during rotary press printings. The rotary press, first used for printing coil stamps in 1915, was a new printing method designed for rapid production. Rather than print stamps on a flat plate one sheet at a time, the rotary press was fitted with a cylindrical plate that continually applied impressions to long rolls of paper.

Rotary press stamps have dimensions that differ slightly from their flat plate counterparts, due to the curvature of the cylinder. If the plate is wrapped around the cylinder from top to bottom (endwise) then the design is slightly longer; if wrapped around from side to side (sidewise) then the design is slightly wider.

At the beginning or end of rotary press printings, there is some leading or trailing paper that is too short for either rolling into coil rolls, or for perforating for 400-subject plates. In 1919, the Bureau devised a plan to salvage this waste by perforating and cutting the sheets into panes. These were put through the flat-plate perforating machine in use at the time, giving the stamps full perforations on all sides.

Scott 596 is waste from a vertical rotary press printing used to make sheet stamps -- a fact proven by the existence of precancelled copies such as the example offered here.

Our updated census of Scott 596 published in our Zoellner sale (and available at our web site at: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/census/596/596.htm) records twelve used stamps. Of these, seven are precancelled at Kansas City Mo. There are no known unused examples.

Census No. 596-CAN-11. Ex Isleham. With 1964, 1992 and 1994 P.F. certificates

45,000
95,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
1998-10-08
The Robert Zoellner Collection of United States
 
Sale Number 804, Lot Number 713, 1923 Rotary Perf 11 Rarities1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11 (596). Light wavy-lines machine cancel, deep shade, remarkably well-centered for this difficult stamp with perfs clear all around, insignificant corner perf crease at top right which does not detract from its appearance in any way

VERY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE THIRTEEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF SCOTT 596 AND ONE OF ONLY FIVE EXAMPLES WITHOUT A PRECANCEL. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF TWENTIETH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

Our census of Scott 596 (see Appendix, p. 388) records thirteen used stamps. None is recorded unused. Of the non-precancelled stamps, two have major faults and one has poor centering. The stamp offered here and one other (Census No. 596-CAN-01) are the only two well-centered non-precancelled examples in existence.

Census No. 596-CAN-02. Ex Clifford Cole. With 1966 P.F. certificate

45,000
80,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
20th Century Issues
20th Century Commemorative Issues
1992-10-03
1992 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 745, Lot Number 796, Later Issues1c Green, Rotary Perf 11, Design 191/4 x 223/4 (596), 1c Green, Rotary Perf 11, Design 191/4 x 223/4 (596)1c Green, Rotary Perf 11, Design 191/4 x 223/4 (596). Nicely centered with wide bottom margin, full perfs all around, wavy line machine cancel rather than the usual Kansas City precancel. Faint corner crease at upper right and what is described as a "tiny tear" at bottom inside one perf, but so infinitesimal as to be more accurately called a minute break. Still Very Fine. Recently discovered and never offered at public auction, this is one of the finest appearing examples we have ever encountered. This Rotary Plate Coil Waste is the rarest 20th Century U. S. stamp known to collectors and one of the rarest of all U. S. stamps. Probably no more than 10 or 12 copies are known and nearly all have the Bureau precancel, "Kansas City Mo." with 1992 P.F. Certificate

15,000
18,000
Back to Top
FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=20th Century Issues, Issue/Country=20th Century Commemorative Issues, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 596

13 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 2


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