Contact Siegel
6 West 48th Street
9th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Contact by phone:
New York: (212) 753-6421
Dallas: (214) 754-5991

86 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 9

Sort By 
FILTER: , Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=19th Century Issues, CategorySearch, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 5
Area/Sub/
General/Issue
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2019-10-29
The William H. Gross Collection: United States Postal History
c
Sale Number 1211, Lot Number 167, 1851 1¢ Blue—Plate 1 Early, A beautiful sheet-margin example of Scott 5--Position 7R1E--cancelled in blue on a petite and immaculately preserved cover

1¢ Blue, Type I (5), Position 7R1E, mostly full to huge margins including top sheet margin, full design at bottom except left ball just touched by tiny nick and minute sealed pre-use tear, rich Plate 1 Early color and impression, tied by blue grid cancel, used with vertical pair of 1¢ Blue, Type II (7), Positions 90/100R1E, huge margins to slightly in, diagonal pre-use crease in bottom stamp, also tied by blue grids with matching "Springfield Ill. Mar. 4" (1852) circular datestamp on a small attractive cover to Keene, Kentucky

Very Fine--a remarkably beautiful cover with a sheet-margin example of the rare 1¢ Type I, Position 7R1E, postmarked in blue.

The example on the cover offered here is especially desirable because it shows almost all of the essential elements of Type I, the top and bottom ornamentation, and it has a sheet margin at top. The cover also has the added attraction of blue cancellations.

Ex William West, Harold W. Stark, George H. Alten and "Sevenoaks." Wagshal census no. 5-COV-077. See our census, available at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5 . Signed by Stanley B. Ashbrook and with his 1955 letter and notes. Scott value of No. 5 on cover is $85,000.00.

HISTORY AND COMMENTARY

The 1¢ Type I Imperforate--One in a Thousand

The 1¢ 1851 stamp, with a bust of Franklin based on Caffieri's sculpture, was one of the workhorses of postage stamps issued during the decade it was current. To print enough 1¢ stamps to meet demand, twelve steel plates were made--one was never used (Plate 6), and the first plate was reworked to add life to it (thus, the Early and Late states). Only Plates 1 through 4 were used to print stamps that were issued imperforate. All stamps from Plates 5 through 12 are perforated. When we refer to a specific position, the position number is shown first (1 to 100), followed by the pane (R for right and L for left) and the plate number (1 to 12).

The original 1¢ 1851 design has an elaborate ornamental border on all four sides. The changes to this ornamental border produced the different types. Ashbrook's type system is based on the premise that Type I should be a printed design that comes closest to the original die design. The presence of the top ornaments, the bottom plumes and scrolls, and the side ornaments is a requirement for Type I. For imperforate stamps, Ashbrook found only one position among the 1,000 entries on Plates 1E, 1L, 2, 3 and 4 that met this requirement: Position 7R1E. The fact that only one position met the Type I criteria is why Scott 5, a Type I imperforate stamp, is so rare. The Wagshal census of Scott 5 contains nearly 100 unduplicated records of stamps in singles and multiples, on and off cover. Therefore, Scott 5 is the rarest of all United States regular issues prior to the 1868 Grills, and fewer than 20 covers survive.

Because of the significance attached to the outer portions of the 1¢ 1851 design, rare types that have been carefully cut apart, so as not to impinge on any part of the design, are extremely desirable. Time has also not been kind to the surviving population, as very few examples of Scott 5 are sound.

E. 20,000-30,000
27,000
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2019-10-29
The William H. Gross Collection: United States Postal History
c
Sale Number 1211, Lot Number 168, 1851 1¢ Blue—Plate 1 Early, A gorgeous 1¢ 1851 Type I--Position 7R1E--used on a printed circular

1¢ Blue, Type I (5), Position 7R1E, large margins, just touched at lower right plume, wonderful early color and impression, few faint toned specks in margin have been removed, tiny sealed pre-use margin tear at lower left, tied by "Pittsburgh Pa. Aug. 13" (1852) circular datestamp on blue printed circular for wholesale dry goods dealer dated August 1852, to Harrisonville, Ohio, Very Fine appearance, an attractive and rare use of the 1¢ 1851 Type I, Position 7R1E, on a printed circular--our census, available at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5 , contains only eight examples on circulars, ex Margaret Woodson Fisher and Hackmey, Wagshal census no. 5-COV-071, signed Ward, with clear 1995 P.F. certificate, Scott value $85,000.00

HISTORY AND COMMENTARY

The 1¢ Type I Imperforate--One in a Thousand

The 1¢ 1851 stamp, with a bust of Franklin based on Caffieri's sculpture, was one of the workhorses of postage stamps issued during the decade it was current. To print enough 1¢ stamps to meet demand, twelve steel plates were made--one was never used (Plate 6), and the first plate was reworked to add life to it (thus, the Early and Late states). Only Plates 1 through 4 were used to print stamps that were issued imperforate. All stamps from Plates 5 through 12 are perforated. When we refer to a specific position, the position number is shown first (1 to 100), followed by the pane (R for right and L for left) and the plate number (1 to 12).

The original 1¢ 1851 design has an elaborate ornamental border on all four sides. The changes to this ornamental border produced the different types. Ashbrook's type system is based on the premise that Type I should be a printed design that comes closest to the original die design. The presence of the top ornaments, the bottom plumes and scrolls, and the side ornaments is a requirement for Type I. For imperforate stamps, Ashbrook found only one position among the 1,000 entries on Plates 1E, 1L, 2, 3 and 4 that met this requirement: Position 7R1E. The fact that only one position met the Type I criteria is why Scott 5, a Type I imperforate stamp, is so rare. The Wagshal census of Scott 5 contains nearly 100 unduplicated records of stamps in singles and multiples, on and off cover. Therefore, Scott 5 is the rarest of all United States regular issues prior to the 1868 Grills, and fewer than 20 covers survive.

Because of the significance attached to the outer portions of the 1¢ 1851 design, rare types that have been carefully cut apart, so as not to impinge on any part of the design, are extremely desirable. Time has also not been kind to the surviving population, as very few examples of Scott 5 are sound.

E. 15,000-20,000
22,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2019-10-29
The William H. Gross Collection: United States Postal History
c
Sale Number 1211, Lot Number 169, 1851 1¢ Blue—Plate 1 Early, One of two vertical strips on cover with Scott 5, Position 7R1E

1¢ Blue, Types I/IIIA/II (5/8A/7), Positions 7/17/27R1E, vertical strip of three, top Type I, middle Type IIIA, bottom Type II, large margins at top and left including sheet margin at top and part of adjoining stamps, just in at bottom, cut in at right, tied by three strikes of "Saint Louis Mo. Nov. 6" (1851) circular datestamp on blue folded cover to New York City, 1851 docketing on flap, Fine, a desirable strip on cover containing the rare Type I, Position 7R1E--one of only two recorded examples on cover in a vertical strip of three, ex Waud and Hackmey, Wagshal census no. 5-COV-088 (available at https://siegelauctions.com/ census/us/scott/5 ), with 2006 P.F. certificate, Scott value $85,000.00

HISTORY AND COMMENTARY

The 1¢ Type I Imperforate--One in a Thousand

The 1¢ 1851 stamp, with a bust of Franklin based on Caffieri's sculpture, was one of the workhorses of postage stamps issued during the decade it was current. To print enough 1¢ stamps to meet demand, twelve steel plates were made--one was never used (Plate 6), and the first plate was reworked to add life to it (thus, the Early and Late states). Only Plates 1 through 4 were used to print stamps that were issued imperforate. All stamps from Plates 5 through 12 are perforated. When we refer to a specific position, the position number is shown first (1 to 100), followed by the pane (R for right and L for left) and the plate number (1 to 12).

The original 1¢ 1851 design has an elaborate ornamental border on all four sides. The changes to this ornamental border produced the different types. Ashbrook's type system is based on the premise that Type I should be a printed design that comes closest to the original die design. The presence of the top ornaments, the bottom plumes and scrolls, and the side ornaments is a requirement for Type I. For imperforate stamps, Ashbrook found only one position among the 1,000 entries on Plates 1E, 1L, 2, 3 and 4 that met this requirement: Position 7R1E. The fact that only one position met the Type I criteria is why Scott 5, a Type I imperforate stamp, is so rare. The Wagshal census of Scott 5 contains nearly 100 unduplicated records of stamps in singles and multiples, on and off cover. Therefore, Scott 5 is the rarest of all United States regular issues prior to the 1868 Grills, and fewer than 20 covers survive.

Because of the significance attached to the outer portions of the 1¢ 1851 design, rare types that have been carefully cut apart, so as not to impinge on any part of the design, are extremely desirable. Time has also not been kind to the surviving population, as very few examples of Scott 5 are sound.

E. 10,000-15,000
55,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2019-10-22
United States Stamps
1094
PSE 90J
 
Sale Number 1209, Lot Number 1094, 1851-56 Issue (Scott 5-17)1c Blue, Ty. I (5), 1c Blue, Ty. I (5)1c Blue, Ty. I (5). Position 7R1E, huge margins to barely touched at bottom, including large sheet margin at top, with significant parts of adjoining stamps at sides (both of which are Type Ib, Scott 5A), very lightly cancelled by North Cumberland Pa. circular datestamp, all of the type characteristics are clearly visible, gorgeous early color and impression

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE SOUND FOUR-MARGIN EXAMPLE OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 TYPE I, POSITION 7R1E, WHICH IS THE ONLY ONE OF THE 1,000 POSITIONS USED TO PRINT IMPERFORATE ONE-CENT STAMPS THAT SHOWS THE COMPLETE DESIGN. THIS IS WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE FINEST IN EXISTENCE, AND IT IS ONE OF TWO GRADED XF 90 JUMBO BY P.S.E. -- THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED.

The published census compiled by Jerome S. Wagshal (available at our website at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5 ) contains at least 98 unduplicated records of Scott 5. There are probably no more than ten examples existing outside of the Wagshal census population. Therefore, the 1c 1851 Type I is the rarest of all United States stamps regularly issued prior to the 1868 Grills.

Because of the significance attached to the outer portions of the 1c 1851 design, rare types that have been carefully cut apart, so as not to impinge on any part of the design, are extremely desirable. The narrow spacing between stamps in the sheet and the users' indifference to the outlying ornamentation during separation are factors that contributed to the great rarity of four-margin copies. The example offered here comes from a strip of three, Positions 6-8R1E, that was removed from a cover. Examples of Position 7R1E (Scott 5) with large side and bottom margins, where there was very little space between it and the adjoining stamps, are true rarities. In fact, using the census data, it is clear that this stamp is among the two or three finest sound off-cover examples known. The ex-Newbury strip on cover and the ex-Vogel single on cover are among the finest examples of Position 7R1E on cover.

Wagshal Census No. 5-COV-82. Ex Jacobs, Krug and Dr. Kapiloff as part of a strip on cover. With 2008 P.S.E. certificate (XF 90 Jumbo; SMQ $525,000.00). This is the highest grade awarded and one other shares it (cancelled in red, ex Merlin). Scott Retail is $65,000.00 and the Scott Catalogue notes "Values for No. 5 are for examples with margins touching or cutting slightly into the design, or for examples with four margins and minor faults. Very few examples with the design untouched exist, and these sell for much more than the values shown."

E. 50,000-75,000
120,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2019-06-26
2019 Rarities of the World
 
Sale Number 1205, Lot Number 2014, 1851-57 Issues1c Blue, Ty. I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A), 1c Blue, Ty. I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A)1c Blue, Ty. I-Ib-Ib (5-5A-5A). Positions 7R1E with 8-9R1E in a horizontal strip of three, left stamp Type I, right pair Type Ib, large margins to slightly in, beautiful early shade and impression nicely complemented by red grid cancels, light corner crease at top left not mentioned in census

FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE ONLY OFF-COVER STRIP OF THREE FROM POSITIONS 7, 8 AND 9 FROM THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE ONE EARLY. AN OUTSTANDING MULTIPLE CONTAINING THE RARE TYPE I AND TWO OF THE SIX POSITIONS THAT PRODUCED TYPE Ib.

The published census compiled by Jerome S. Wagshal (available at our website at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5 ) contains at least 98 unduplicated records of Scott 5. There are probably no more than ten examples existing outside of the Wagshal census population. Therefore, the 1c 1851 Type I is the rarest of all United States stamps issued regularly prior to the 1868 Grills.

The census lists three covers bearing strips with these exact positions. The famous unused block of eight (currently in a private collection and not likely to be available for some time) also contains these positions.

Wagshal Census No. 5-MUL-067. Ex Richey and Neinken. Scott value as a strip of three with one stamp Type I is $203,000.00

E. 50,000-75,000
26,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2019-05-01
Gem-Quality United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1199, Lot Number 1015, 1c 1851-56 Issue (Scott 5-9)1c Blue, Ty. I (5), 1c Blue, Ty. I (5)1c Blue, Ty. I (5). Position 7R1E, large margins to just barely in, including sheet margin at top, bright Plate 1 Early shade, detailed impression, bold strike of black New York square grid cancel, completely sound

VERY FINE. A RARE SOUND AND CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 TYPE I, SCOTT 5, WHICH COMES ONLY FROM POSITION 7 IN THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE ONE EARLY. ONLY ONE OUT OF THE 1,000 POSITIONS ON PLATES USED TO PRINT THE STAMPS ISSUED IMPERFORATE IS THE TYPE I, WHICH HAS THE DESIGN NEARLY COMPLETE, INCLUDING THE ORNAMENTAL PLUMES AND BALLS AND TOP AND BOTTOM. ONE OF THE MOST DIFFICULT OF ALL CLASSIC UNITED STATES STAMPS TO FIND IN SOUND CONDITION.

The published census compiled by Jerome S. Wagshal (available at our website at https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5 ) contains at least 98 unduplicated records of Scott 5. There are probably no more than ten examples existing outside of the Wagshal census population. Therefore, the 1c 1851 Type I is the rarest of all United States stamps issued regularly prior to the 1868 Grills.

Because of the significance attached to the outer portions of the 1c 1851 design, rare types that have been carefully cut apart, so as not to impinge on any part of the design, are extremely desirable. The narrow spacing between stamps in the sheet and the users' indifference to the outlying ornamentation during separation are factors that contributed to the great rarity of four-margin examples. Time has also not been kind to the surviving population, as very few are sound. The example offered here, in sound condition, with a sheet margin at top and with the type characteristics visible, is regarded as one of the finest in existence.

Wagshal Census No. 5-CAN-023. Ex Neinken and Wagshal (this is the first time this stamp has been offered since Jerome Wagshal passed away -- it was not part of our series of Wagshal sales). With 1947 R.P.S. certificate.

65,000
40,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2018-10-03
United States Stamp Treasures: The William H. Gross Collection
 
Sale Number 1188, Lot Number 30, 1c 1851-56 Issue, including Rare Types and Complete Pane, A superb pair of the 1¢ 1851 Issue from Plate 1 Early, containing the rare Type I, Position 7R1E, the only imperforate Type I produced from any of the plates used to print 1¢ 1851-60 Issue stamp

DESCRIPTION

1¢ Blue, Type Ib-I Combination Pair (5A-5), Positions 6-7R1E--the sixth and seventh stamps in the top row of the right pane of Plate 1 Early, including the coveted Type I with the complete ornamentation all around--horizontal pair with huge top sheet margin and mostly large margins all around, deep Plate 1 Early shade and impression, cancelled by two strikes of blue “Nashville Te. Nov. 14” (1851) circular datestamp, bright and fresh paper and color

PROVENANCE

As a strip of three, Positions 6-8R1E:

* George H. Worthington, J. C. Morgenthau sale, 8/21-23/1917, lot 40, to Stanley B. Ashbrook

* John H. Clapp (died in 1940; collection sold to Spencer Anderson)

* Harmer, Rooke sale, 4/26/1944, lot 52

* Greg Manning sale, 9/23/1983, lot 30

Right stamp removed, sold as a pair, Positions 6-7R1E:

* James Hewitt, Steve Ivy Philatelic Auctions AMERIPEX sale, 5/26/1986, lot 93, to Allan Fox

* Allan Fox, Spink Shreves Galleries, 3/24-25/2011, lot 11, to William H. Gross

CENSUS, LITERATURE AND EXHIBITION REFERENCES

* Waghal census no. 5-MUL-063

* https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5

CERTIFICATION

* The Philatelic Foundation (1983) for strip of three

CONDITION NOTES

* Extremely Fine

* Part of Stanley B. Ashbrook signature in pencil remains

VIEW PDF OF HISTORY AND COMMENTARY at https://siegelauctions.com/2018/1188/30.pdf

E. 75,000-100,000
135,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2018-10-03
United States Stamp Treasures: The William H. Gross Collection
c
Sale Number 1188, Lot Number 31, 1c 1851-56 Issue, including Rare Types and Complete Pane, A sound, four-margin and unusually beautiful example of the rare and coveted 1851 1¢ Blue Type I--Position 7R1E, Scott 5--paying the printed matter rate on a blue circular with complementary blue Philadelphia datestamp cancel

DESCRIPTION

1¢ Blue, Type I (5), Position 7R1E, beautiful bright Plate 1 Early color and sharp impression, full to large margins showing trace of Position 8R1E at right, only the tips of the upper left side ornaments are shaved (and barely so), lightly tied by blue “Philadelphia Pa. 1 Paid Feb. [day]” (1852) integral-rate circular datestamp on blue folded printed First Annual Report of the United States Life Insurance, Annuity & Trust Company with beautiful two-tone illustration of building on inside, also printed on a large part of address panel, neatly addressed to J. F. Van Nort in Newburgh, New York

PROVENANCE

* Alfred H. Caspary, H. R. Harmer sale, 1/16-18/1956, lot 186, to “K.E.”

* J. David Baker, Siegel Auction Galleries, 4/24/1968, Sale 333, lot 612, to Vogel

* Raymond Vogel, Siegel Auction Galleries, 12/7/2010, Sale 998, lot 1, to William H. Gross

CENSUS, LITERATURE AND EXHIBITION REFERENCES

* Wagshal census no. 5-COV-074

* https://siegelauctions.com/census/us/scott/5

* ANPHILEX 1996, Alumni Exhibits (Vogel)

CERTIFICATION

* The Philatelic Foundation (2011)

CONDITION NOTES

* Extremely Fine stamp and folded circular with horizontal fold at top well clear of stamp

VIEW PDF OF HISTORY AND COMMENTARY at https://siegelauctions.com/2018/1188/31.pdf

E. 75,000-100,000
62,500
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2018-04-11
The David Wingate Collection of United States Stamps
ng
Sale Number 1180, Lot Number 31, 1851-56 Issue (Scott 5-17)1c Blue, Ty. I (5), 1c Blue, Ty. I (5)1c Blue, Ty. I (5). Position 7R1E, the seventh stamp from the right pane of the first plate in its early state, unused (no gum), large margins at top and left including top sheet margin, just in at bottom and right but the characteristics are clearly identifiable, lovely bright color from an early printing, small surface scrape at right has been expertly improved, few creases, accompanying certificate also notes toning which has since been removed

AN EXTREMELY RARE UNUSED EXAMPLE OF THE ONE-CENT 1851 TYPE I, POSITION 7R1E, SCOTT 5. THIS IS THE ONLY ONE OF THE 1,000 POSITIONS USED TO PRINT IMPERFORATE ONE-CENT STAMPS THAT SHOWS THE COMPLETE DESIGN. ONLY THREE UNUSED EXAMPLES ARE RECORDED.

The published census compiled by Jerome S. Wagshal contains 90 unduplicated records of Scott 5. There have been one or two additions to the Wagshal census, and there are probably no more than a few examples existing outside of the census population. Therefore, the 1c 1851 Type I is the rarest of all United States stamps regularly issued prior to the 1868 Grills.

Only three are recorded in unused condition:

5-UNC-01 -- Single, without gum, clear margins at top and left (no sheet margin at top), in to clear at left and bottom, sound, reattached to pair of Positions 8 and 9R1E, ex Ferrary, Hind and Burrus (as strip of three), Waterhouse (who separated the single), Heathcoate, Wunderlich, Dr. Test and Gross;

5-OG-02 -- Included in irregular block of eight (Positions 4-9/14-15R1E), with original gum, Position 7R1E affected by vertical crease ending in small tear and also light diagonal crease, ex Lapham and Dr. Kapiloff;

5-UNC-03 -- The stamp offered here, single, without gum, clear margins at top and left with top sheet margin, just in but identifiable margins at right and bottom, small surface scrape has been improved, few creases, discovered in 1998.

This extremely rare unused stamp was discovered in 1998 in an album of otherwise negligible value. It was certified and auctioned by the Kelleher firm in Boston, where it realized $55,000 hammer. It was then offered in a November 2000 Bennett sale, where it realized $80,000 hammer.

With 1998 P.F. certificate

225,000
90,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
19th Century Issues
1851-56 Issue
2018-04-11
The David Wingate Collection of United States Stamps
 
Sale Number 1180, Lot Number 32, 1851-56 Issue (Scott 5-17)1c Blue, Ty. I (5), 1c Blue, Ty. I (5)1c Blue, Ty. I (5). Position 7R1E, the seventh stamp from the right pane of the first plate in its early state, large margins, clear at bottom except right plume just slightly touched, beautiful bright color in distinctive Plate 1 Early shade, intense impression showing minute details of double transfer, no visible trace of a cancellation (P.F. certificate states "faint manuscript cancel" at top), a small thin spot does not detract from appearance, otherwise sound

EXTREMELY FINE UNUSED APPEARANCE. ONLY POSITION 7R1E--THE SEVENTH STAMP IN THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE 1 EARLY--FURNISHED IMPERFORATE 1851 ONE-CENT STAMPS SHOWING THE COMPLETE DESIGN (TYPE I). VERY FEW EXAMPLES OF THIS STAMP HAVE MARGINS AS LARGE AS THE ONE OFFERED HERE. OF THE RAREST AND MOST DESIRABLE CLASSIC UNITED STATES STAMPS.

The published census compiled by Jerome S. Wagshal contains at least 98 unduplicated records of Scott 5. There have been one or two additions to the Wagshal census, and there are probably no more than a few examples existing outside of the census population. Therefore, the 1c 1851 Type I is the rarest of all United States stamps regularly issued prior to the 1868 Grills.

With the 1998 discovery of another unused Scott 5, there are now three unused examples of this stamp, of which one is sound. Prior to 1930, the stamp offered here was owned by Henry C. Gibson, who regarded it as unused. Subsequently, a debate arose as to whether or not it had been cancelled, due to the presence of a few tiny, very faint spots. The same sort of spotting is found on the original-gum multiple containing Scott 5. We believe it is quite possible that this stamp is unused, although a 1996 P.F. certificate stated "faintly cancelled with a small thin spot." (certificate was lost before 1999 auction) and 1999 P.F. certificate states "faint manuscript cancellation" in the "submitted as" portion of the certificate.

Census No. 5-CAN-004. Ex Gibson, Lawrence and Dr. Graves ("Argentum" Collection). With 1999 P.F. certificate

67,500
40,000
Back to Top
FILTER: , Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, General=19th Century Issues, CategorySearch, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 5

86 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 9


Copyright 2020. All rights reserved by Siegel Auction Galleries Inc. Information and images may be used with credit to Siegel Auction Galleries or siegelauctions.com subject to guidelines and restrictions.
Website Terms of Use and Privacy Policy