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10 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 1

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, Issue/Country=Confederate States and Civil-War Related, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = Southern Letter Unpaid
Area/Sub/
General/Issue
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2019-07-23
United States Stamps and Confederate States
c
Sale Number 1206, Lot Number 982, Confederate States: Uses of U.S. Stamps, Handstamped PaidsLouisville Ky. Southern Letter Unpaid, Louisville Ky. Southern Letter UnpaidLouisville Ky. Southern Letter Unpaid. Pale yellow cover addressed to Louisville Ky., entered Confederate mails with blue "Charlottesville Va. Jun. 19, 1861" double-circle datestamp with "10" and "Paid" C.S.A. rate handstamps, attempted payment of U.S. postage with 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), not accepted as prepayment in Louisville where bold blue "DUE" handstamp struck with manuscript "3", reduced slightly at top clipping corner of stamp, edge stains and repaired tear at upper left, otherwise Fine and very rare example of Confederate mail to Louisville after suspension of the Nashville-Louisville mail route, had this been addressed anywhere north of Louisville it would have received the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp, letters addressed locally were marked "Due" for unpaid postage, examples of Southern Letter Unpaid mail delivered in Louisville are exceedingly rare

E. 500-750
3,500
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-11-20
The Brandon Collection, Part 2: General Issues and Postal History
c
Sale Number 1087, Lot Number 47, Suspension of Mail RoutesSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp perfectly struck with matching "DUE 3" straightline handstamp on 3c Red on White Star Die entire (U26) to T. Jeff Tobias, care of Tobias, Henricks & Co., P.O. Box 3206 in New York City, "Charleston S.C. Jun. 11, 1861" double-circle datestamp and "Paid 10" C.S.A. rate handstamp, repaired top left corner (does not affect marking) and small edge nick and slightly reduced at right

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVERS FROM CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA, THE PLACE WHERE SECESSION STARTED AND THE FIRST SHOTS OF THE WAR WERE FIRED ON FORT SUMTER.

The U.S. May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north.

With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp.

There are 29 "Southern Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication). The covers without the Louisville datestamp were released from Louisville on June 25. Two covers are recorded from Charleston, both dated June 11 (the other has the Louisville June 26 datestamp).

Special Routes Census No. SLU-11. Ex Weatherly

E. 15,000-20,000
15,500
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2013-04-18
Confederate States Stamps and Postal History
c
Sale Number 1043, Lot Number 2001, Southn. Letter UnpaidSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Bold strike of two-line handstamp in blue, only the first word somewhat incomplete, matching "DUE 3" straightline and "Louisville Ky. Jun. 29" (1861) double-circle datestamp (date struck in error) on small cover to Brandenburg, Kentucky, initially entered the C.S.A. mails with "Salem Va. Jul. 2" circular datestamp and manuscript "PM at Louisville will forward this letter to Brandenburg", matching "Paid 5ct" C.S.A. rate at top left, some ink bleeding from the Louisville handstamps and the manuscript notation at bottom, part of top flap removed

FINE AND RARE EXAMPLE OF THE "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" MARKING ON A COVER ADDRESSED TO KENTUCKY. ONE OF THREE RECORDED WITH THE INCORRECTLY-DATED LOUISVILLE DATESTAMP.

By Postmaster General Blair's order of May 27, mail service to disloyal Southern states was discontinued. On or about June 8, mail exchange between Louisville and Nashville was also banned. Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage.

This cover was mailed from Salem Va. on July 2 and arrived at Louisville on approximately July 5. However, the postal clerk applied the June 29 marking in error, neglecting to change the date slug in his handstamp. There are two other covers listed in the Special Routes census that also arrived after June 29 but received the June 29 datestamp.

A total of 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers are recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication).

Special Routes Census No. SLU-20. Ex Grant, Meroni and Felton. With 1994 C.S.A. certificate

E. 5,000-7,500
8,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2011-11-15
Confederate States, U.S. Postal History, General Foreign
c
Sale Number 1016, Lot Number 528, Confederate States: Southern Letter Unpaid, First Day Postal SystemSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Bold strike of two-line handstamp in blue, only the first word somewhat incomplete, matching "DUE 3" straightline and "Louisville Ky. Jun. 29" double-circle datestamp (date struck in error), on small cover to Brandenburg, Kentucky, initially entered the C.S.A. mails with "Salem Va. Jul. 2" circular datestamp and manuscript "PM at Louisville will forward this letter to Brandenburg", matching "Paid 5ct" C.S.A. rate at top left, some ink bleeding from the Louisville handstamps and the ms. notation at bottom, part of top flap removed

FINE AND RARE EXAMPLE OF THE "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" MARKING ON A COVER ADDRESSED TO KENTUCKY. ONE OF THREE RECORDED WITH THE INCORRECTLY-DATED LOUISVILLE DATESTAMP.

By Postmaster General Blair's order of May 27, mail service to disloyal Southern states was discontinued. On or about June 8, mail exchange between Louisville and Nashville was also banned. Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage.

This cover was mailed from Salem Va. on July 2 and arrived at Louisville on approximately July 5. However, the postal clerk applied the June 29 marking in error, neglecting to change the date slug in his handstamp. There are two other covers listed in the Special Routes census that also arrived after June 29 but received the June 29 datestamp.

A total of 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers are recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication).

Census No. SLU-20. With 1994 C.S.A. certificate

E. 7,500-10,000
6,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 34, Southern Letter Unpaid MailSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp, matching "DUE 3" straightline handstamp and "Louisville Jul. 6, 1861" double-circle datestamp on 3c Red on White Star Die entire (U26) addressed to Richard J. Gatling in Indianapolis, Indiana, "Murfreesborough N.C. Jun. 28" circular datestamp with "Paid" and "10" C.S.A. rate handstamps, neat receipt docketing "Jas. H. Gatling, Ans. July 15th 1861", immaculate condition

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF ALL "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" COVERS AND OF GREAT HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE. SENT BY JAMES HENRY GATLING TO HIS BROTHER, RICHARD JORDAN GATLING, FAMED INVENTOR OF THE "GATLING GUN", WHICH WAS PATENTED IN THE YEAR THIS COVER WAS MAILED.

This cover was mailed in Murfreesborough, North Carolina, on June 28, 1861, by James Henry Gatling to his younger brother, Richard, in Indianapolis. It passed through Nashville and reached Louisville around July 4. Two days later, it was marked with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" and "Due 3" handstamps, as well as the "Louisville Ky. Jul. 6, 1861" double-circle postmark.

At this time, Richard Gatling was in Indianapolis to establish a business for his new invention, the "Gatling Gun," the first successful machine gun. According to Gatling, he invented the rapid-firing machine gun to reduce the size of armies and, therefore, decrease the number of fatalities due to disease. In 1857, he wrote: "It occurred to me that if I could invent a machine -- a gun -- which could by its rapidity of fire, enable one man to do as much battle duty as a hundred, that it would, to a large extent supersede the necessity of large armies, and consequently, exposure to battle and disease [would] be greatly diminished." After developing and demonstrating a working prototype, in 1862 he founded the Gatling Gun Company in Indianapolis. The first six production guns were destroyed during a fire in December 1862 at the factory where they had been manufactured at Gatling's expense. Undaunted, Gatling arranged for another thirteen to be manufactured at the Cincinnati Type Factory. While General Benjamin F. Butler bought twelve and Admiral David D. Porter bought one, it was not until the end of the war that the U.S. Army officially purchased Gatling guns. In 1870 he sold his patents for the Gatling gun to Colt. Gatling remained president of the Gatling Gun Company until it was fully absorbed by Colt in 1897. The hand-cranked Gatling gun was declared obsolete by the U.S. Army in 1911. [Reference: Wikipedia]

Richard's older brother, James Henry Gatling, began a life-long fascination with flight by observing birds and building kites as a child. Gatling finished building North Carolina's first airplane in 1873. Twin wooden propellers were powered by cranking a handwheel, and more cockpit levers operated the front elevator, vertical rudder, and wings. Using poplar and thin pieces of oak, Gatling built a fuselage and wings light enough to be sustained by muscle power alone. Gatling supposed that once his plane was airborne, the machine wouldn't require as much of his energy. Gatling planned to fly the craft from atop a twelve-foot high platform on his gin mill to a road a mile away, now Highway 258. On a Sunday afternoon in 1873, his farmhands pushed him off the platform while Gatling cranked the handwheel. The plane was aloft only a short distance before Gatling crashed into an elm tree at the edge of his yard. He received minor injuries, but never flew again. His plane was destroyed in a fire in 1905. [Reference: http://www.archives.ncdcr.gov/ffc/Flight/Aviation/James_Henry_Gatling.html]

Special

Routes Census No. SLU-19 (illustrated on p. 15). Illustrated in Ashbrook Special Service (No. 67, Oct. 1956, p. 542, photo 267). Ex Knapp, Kimmell, "Old Oak" and Birkinbine. With 1976 P.F. certificate

E. 20,000-30,000
26,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 35, Southern Letter Unpaid MailSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp and "DUE 3" straightline handstamp, both tying 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), creased at upper left and a few short perfs, matching "Louisville Ky. Jun. 30" (1861) double-circle datestamp on small cover addressed to Rev. John C. Tate in Bloomfield, Kentucky, manuscript "Milford Texas May 31" postmark (pen lines cancelling stamp)

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB EXAMPLE OF THE "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" MARKING USED TO CANCEL THE UNITED STATES STAMP.

The U.S. May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north. With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp. Louisville started marking letters on June 25, but this first group did not have a datestamp. The subsequent group and all of those thereafter have the Louisville circular datestamp (June 27, 28 and 29 being the most common dates). As a matter of record, this is the only recorded "Southn. Letter Unpaid" cover with the June 30 datestamp.

United States postage stamps and stamped envelopes used from the South were regarded as contraband and were refused as prepayment. There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), of which only 13 have the 3c U.S. adhesive stamp used to pay the domestic rate. Two of the 13 are used with the New Orleans provisional (offered in this sale) and one is in the Smithsonian National Postal Museum, leaving only ten 3c 1857 Issue stamped covers with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking. This cover has a very early origin date -- May 31 -- and since it was mailed while the post office in Milford, Texas, was still technically as U.S. post office, there was no Confederate postage paid. Only two "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers with only U.S. postage are recorded, both dated May 31 from Texas (the other is in the Smithsonian National Postal Museum collection).

Special Routes Census No. SLU-17. Ex Caspary and Kilbourne.

E. 20,000-30,000
50,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 36, Southern Letter Unpaid MailSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp ties 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), gum toned, matching "DUE 3" straightline handstamp and "Louisville Jun. 27" double-circle datestamp on cover addressed to "Miss A. Barron, No. 457 New York Avenue, Washington, District Columbia" (apparently in the hand of Commodore Samuel A. Barron) and directed "Care of Thomas F. Harkness, Esqr." -- Harkness was a government letter carrier in Washington D.C. -- partly clear "Salisbury N.C. Jun. 6" (1861) circular datestamp and "Paid" straightline (pen lines on stamp, but no indication of C.S.A. rate other than "Paid"), lightened waterstain at lower left, part of backflap removed

VERY FINE. A RARE "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" COVER WITH THE 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE AND DELIVERED BY THE UNITED STATES POST OFFICE LETTER CARRIER IN WASHINGTON D.C.

This was mailed from Salisbury, North Carolina, during the first week the Confederate postal system was operational. It probably reached Nashville just as the last U.S. route agent mail was carried north to Louisville. The mail received at Louisville on June 13-14 was held pending instructions to Postmaster John J. Speed, which were received by wire on June 24. The first group to be processed with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking (on June 25, but without a datestamp) was actually received in Louisville by private express after the U.S. route agent delivered the mail containing this cover. The second group was processed on June 26 and 27 and has the Louisville datestamp.

United States postage stamps and stamped envelopes used from the South were regarded as contraband and were refused as prepayment. There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), of which only 13 have the 3c U.S. adhesive stamp used to pay the domestic rate. Two of the 13 are used with the New Orleans provisional (offered in this sale) and one is in the Smithsonian National Postal Museum, leaving only ten 3c 1857 Issue stamped covers with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking.

The street address and "Care of Thomas F. Harkness Esqr." directive are clear indications that this was delivered by the letter carrier in Washington D.C. We are unaware of any other "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers that were clearly marked for carrier delivery. It is likely that this was sent by Commodore Samuel Barron, because he was in North Carolina in June 1861, and he would have been aware of the carrier's name from the time he spent in Washington D.C.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-1 (illustrated on p. 13). Ex Piller. With 1993 P.F. certificate

E. 10,000-15,000
21,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 37, Southern Letter Unpaid Mail"Farnham Va. June 13th 1861", "Farnham Va. June 13th 1861""Farnham Va. June 13th 1861". Manuscript postmark and "Paid 5cts" C.S.A. rate with "10" re-rate on 3c Red on Buff Nesbitt (U10) entire to Louisville, pen cancel on 3c embossed stamp, blue grid cancel and matching "DUE" straightline with manuscript "3" U.S. rate applied at Louisville, pressed-out vertical fold at center and small part of backflap trimmed away

VERY FINE. EXTREMELY RARE EXAMPLE OF CONFEDERATE MAIL TO LOUISVILLE AFTER SUSPENSION OF THE NASHVILLE-LOUISVILLE MAIL ROUTE. THIS IS A "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER.

The U.S. May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north. On June 15, after the U.S. mail agent had been withdrawn from the Nashville-Louisville route (the last trip was on June 12), the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was in one of the daily mails forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement, arriving in Louisville on or about June 18.

United States postage stamps and stamped envelopes used from the South were regarded as contraband and were refused as prepayment. The familiar "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp was used by the Louisville post office on mail sent north, but letters addressed locally were marked "Due" for unpaid postage. Examples of "Southern Letter Unpaid" mail delivered in Louisville are exceedingly rare.

Ex Gallagher

E. 3,000-4,000
2,500
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2007-09-27
The Buck Boshwit Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 940, Lot Number 214, Southern Letter UnpaidSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp with matching "Louisville Ky. Jun. 29" (1861) double-circle datestamp and "DUE 3" straightline handstamp on La Grange Synodical College's Sigma Chi Fraternity corner card cover to Delaware O. (Ohio Wesleyan University), bold "Union City Tennessee" negative letters in large circle handstamp, ms. "Jul. 9" date, slightly reduced at left

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID COVER WITH THE DISTINCTIVE UNION CITY TENNESSEE NEGATIVE HANDSTAMP AND CORNER CARD OF THE SHORT-LIVED LA GRANGE SYNODICAL COLLEGE. ONE OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF THE BOSHWIT COLLECTION AND OF CONFEDERATE POSTAL HISTORY.

Steven C. Walske's recently published analysis of mail service at the onset of the Civil War provides new information about circumstances surrounding the use of the coveted "Southern Letter Unpaid" marking. Postmaster General Blair's May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north. With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12, "Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. This held mail later became the well-known 'Southern Letter Unpaid' mail" (Walske).

United States postage stamps affixed in the South (and entires used from the South) were regarded as contraband and were refused as prepayment. On June 24, Dr. J. J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southern Letter Unpaid" handstamp.

Immediately after receiving instructions from Washington to forward the held mail, the Louisville post office began marking letters. Some of these have circular datestamps (June 27, 28 and 29 being the most common dates), while others have no Louisville datestamp. The Louisiana office continued to use the June 29 datestamp until the end of the Southern Letter Unpaid period on July 12.

This cover is unusual in that it was posted from Union City, Tennessee, without stamps or any notation of postage paid (U.S. or Confederate). The presence of a corner card on a Southern Letter Unpaid cover is also extremely unusual. The Chi Mu Society was a fraternal organization (Sigma Chi) at La Grange Synodical College, which was founded in 1857, but closed in 1861 due to the Civil War. It was used as a storage facility by the occupying Union army.

Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 8). Ex Emerson.

E. 20,000-30,000
22,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1995-12-11
Confederate States Stamps and Covers
c
Sale Number 772, Lot Number 3031, Southern ExpressesSOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp, matching "DUE 3" and "Louisville Ky. Jun. 27" double circle ds on stampless cover to Mount Sterling, Ky., with blue "Richmond Tex. Jun." cds and red "PAID 10" hs, small edge nick at R., not affecting markings, Fine and rare marking, the only recorded example on a Texas cover, with 1963 P.F. certificate

E. 7,500-10,000
11,000
Back to Top
FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, Issue/Country=Confederate States and Civil-War Related, All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = Southern Letter Unpaid

10 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 1


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