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2 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 1

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, Issue/Country=Confederate States and Civil-War Related, All Sale Dates thru 2022/01/01, Catalogue = Florence Prison, Symbol IN ("COVER")
Area/Sub/
General/Issue
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2020-09-09
Civil War Postal History, featuring the 'Ambassador' Collection
c
Sale Number 1225, Lot Number 317, Flag-of-Truce MailFlorence Prison, Florence S.C, Florence Prison, Florence S.CFlorence Prison, Florence S.C. Small folded letter from prisoner-of-war to his wife in Philadelphia Pa., datelined "Florence Prison S. Carolina Oct 12 1864", endorsed "From James Moody, Co K 7th Regt Prisoner of War Camp Florence SC", bold manuscript "Examined", mixed franking with C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12) and U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), both tied by "Port Royal Nov (?) '64" double-circle datestamp, letter states "I have been a prisoner since the 5th of May...We are all in a very destitute condition. I have been very sick for some time but I am something better at present.", edges restored from prior adhesive stains, stamps with couple minor faults

VERY FINE APPEARING AND EXTREMELY RARE PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER FROM FLORENCE PRISON, SENT BY FLAG-OF-TRUCE VIA POCOTALIGO AND PORT ROYAL. FEWER THAN TEN ARE KNOWN.

According to Wikipedia: "The Florence Stockade was built and became operational in September 1864, and was in use during the final fall and winter of the war. During its time of operation, anywhere from 15,000 to 18,000 captives were held there. The need for additional prisons became imperative after General Sherman captured Atlanta on September 1, 1864. Andersonville prison in south Georgia was thought to be in the path of Sherman and the Confederate prison authorities determined to relocate the approximately 30,000 Union prisoners then at Andersonville. Because Florence had three railroads, and was thought to be secure, it was chosen as a site for a newly constructed prison. To keep the Union soldiers in order during relocation, they were told that they were to be paroled. Many of those who were unable to walk or not stable enough to travel were left behind in Andersonville. Of the total number of prisoners that passed through the Florence Stockade, 2,802 Union soldiers died there and most were buried in unmarked trenches in what would become the Florence National Cemetery after the war."

Ex Walske. Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 242)

E. 1,500-2,000
2,100
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 215, Flag-of-Truce Mail: Pocotaligo-Port RoyalFlorence Prison, Florence S.C, Florence Prison, Florence S.CFlorence Prison, Florence S.C. Small folded letter from prisoner-of-war to his wife in Philadelphia Pa., datelined "Florence Prison S. Carolina Oct 12 1864", endorsed "From James Moody, Co K 7th Regt Prisoner of War Camp Florence SC", bold manuscript "Examined", mixed franking with C.S.A. postage paid by 10c Blue, Die B (12) and U.S. postage paid by 3c Rose (65), both tied by "Port Royal Nov (?) '64" double-circle datestamp, letter states "I have been a prisoner since the 5th of May...We are all in a very destitute condition. I have been very sick for some time but I am something better at present.", edges restored from prior adhesive stains

VERY FINE APPEARING AND EXTREMELY RARE PRISONER-OF-WAR COVER FROM FLORENCE PRISON, SENT BY FLAG-OF-TRUCE VIA POCOTALIGO AND PORT ROYAL. FEWER THAN TEN ARE KNOWN.

According to Wikipedia: "The Florence Stockade was built and became operational in September 1864, and was in use during the final fall and winter of the war. During its time of operation, anywhere from 15,000 to 18,000 captives were held there. The need for additional prisons became imperative after General Sherman captured Atlanta on September 1, 1864. Andersonville prison in south Georgia was thought to be in the path of Sherman and the Confederate prison authorities determined to relocate the approximately 30,000 Union prisoners then at Andersonville. Because Florence had three railroads, and was thought to be secure, it was chosen as a site for a newly constructed prison. To keep the Union soldiers in order during relocation, they were told that they were to be paroled. Many of those who were unable to walk or not stable enough to travel were left behind in Andersonville. Of the total number of prisoners that passed through the Florence Stockade, 2,802 Union soldiers died there and most were buried in unmarked trenches in what would become the Florence National Cemetery after the war."

Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 242)

E. 2,000-3,000
1,700
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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, Issue/Country=Confederate States and Civil-War Related, All Sale Dates thru 2022/01/01, Catalogue = Florence Prison, Symbol IN ("COVER")

2 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 1


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