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34 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 4
6 of your results are from upcoming Sale No. 1207

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FILTER: All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = Running Pony
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2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 1, Pony Express Covers, Perfect St. Joseph Running Pony oval dated May 20, 1860--the first westbound Pony mail delayed by Paiute Indian War and carried with military escort

Pony Express, St. Joseph, May 20 (1860). Full clear strike of Running Pony oval datestamp on 10¢ Green on Buff Nesbitt entire (U16) addressed to Herman Wohler in San Francisco, sender's directive "By Pony Express", no government postmark and no indication of origin or $5.00 rate, small sealed tear

EXTREMELY FINE. THE EARLIEST OF THE FOUR RECORDED WESTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVERS DELAYED DUE TO THE PAIUTE INDIAN WAR IN 1860. THE CONDITION OF THIS EARLY AND HISTORIC PONY EXPRESS COVER IS OUTSTANDING. NO OTHER MAY 20 COVER IS RECORDED.

The attacks on Pony Express stations and riders occurred during the Paiute Indian War, which started with the May 7 raid on Williams Station in Nevada by a party of Paiute and Bannock warriors seeking revenge for the kidnapping and rape of two young Paiute girls by the three Williams brothers. On May 12 a 105-man militia led by Major William Ormsby was ambushed and destroyed at Pyramid Lake by Indian warriors under the command of Chief Numaga. On May 20 and 21 Indians attacked stations at Cold Springs, Smith's Creek and Simpson's Park. The second battle of Pyramid Lake occurred on June 2-4 between Chief Numaga's warriors and a large army under the command of a veteran Indian fighter, Colonel John Coffee Hays. The battle ended in a stalemate, and Indians continued to conduct raids on stations and harass riders through the summer. The presence of U.S. troops guarding the route helped keep the stage and Pony Express running during July and August 1860, but several mails were delayed and combined as they waited for an escort.

This May 20, 1860, cover was included in the first of the westbound Pony Express mails delayed due to the war. The previous westbound mail which departed St. Joseph one week earlier, on Sunday, May 13, was carried through the war zone on Robert "Pony Bob" Haslam's historic 380-mile round trip on May 19-21. The mail datestamped May 20 was carried as far west as possible and held until a military escort could accompany the riders beyond the dangerous part of the route. Mail from three subsequent trips--May 27, June 3 and June 10--eventually caught up with the May 20 mail, somewhere near Ruby Valley, and was carried to California. The Daily Alta California 6/24/1860 contains a report from Carson City dated June 23, which states, "The long missing Pony Express arrived at Carson City last evening, bringing dates from St. Louis to June 10th." The San Francisco Bulletin 6/25/1860 reported "The Pony Express will arrive here to-night about 10 o'clock, on board the Sacramento steamer. The Express will bring four several letter-bags--the number now due--and will have altogether 300 letters, at least" (boldface added for emphasis, original article shown on page 16). This report confirms that the four delayed Pony mails arrived in San Francisco on June 25.

Five covers are recorded with these departure dates (FKW census W4, W5, W6, W7 and W10). One of these left St. Joseph on June 3, but was delivered to a military officer at Camp Floyd near Salt Lake City (W6), so it is technically not a cover delayed by the war. The westbound trip departing from St. Joseph on Sunday, June 10, was the last scheduled Sunday departure, and it made it through to California after catching up with the three earlier mails. The Mountaineer 6/16/1860 reports the arrival of an express from the East in Salt Lake City at 8 p.m. on June 15, which fits with the June 10 departure.

How did the express with the four mails, including this cover, travel westward to Carson City? A soldier named Charles A. Scott reported in his journal that the military escort of "20 picked men, well armed and mounted," which guarded the May 25 eastbound mail through hostile territory after they left Carson City on June 9, passed through Roberts' Creek on June 15. The convoy moved at a rate of approximately 40 miles per day, obviously a much slower pace than an individual Pony rider could achieve. The timing strongly indicates that the westbound mail, which had accumulated in the safe zone for weeks, was carried to Carson City with the same military escort on its return trip. The westbound express reached Carson City during the evening of June 22 (Daily Alta California 6/24/1860). Six days of travel points to a June 16 or 17 departure from somewhere near Ruby Valley, where the 4th Artillery had set up their base of operations.

FKW Census W4. Ex Elliott N. Evans (pencil source notation on back with 1969 acquisition year), Dr. Polland and Haas. With 1969 P.F. certificate.

E. 40,000-50,000
Future Sale
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 2, Pony Express Covers, St. Joseph June 3, 1860, Running Pony oval and Latham free frank--westbound Pony mail delayed by Paiute Indian War and carried with military escort

Pony Express, St. Joseph, Jun. 3 (1860). Full clear strike of Running Pony oval datestamp on cover with free frank "Milton S. Latham U.S.S." and addressed in his hand to General James W. Denver, care of Frank Denver in Sacramento, Latham's directive "Per Pony Express" along left edge, blue crayon "Free" above oval and pencil "Free F.A.M." at right, lightened stain and minor cosmetic improvements

VERY FINE. ONE OF FOUR RECORDED WESTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVERS DELAYED DUE TO THE PAIUTE INDIAN WAR IN 1860, OF WHICH TWO HAVE FREE FRANKS.

As documented in The Impact of Indian Attacks on the Pony Express in 1860 (published by our firm and available at http://siegelauctions.com/enc/Pony_Indians.pdf), even when service in California and Nevada was suspended from June 1 to July 6, 1860, the Pony Express continued to run in both directions on a shortened route between St. Joseph and Ruby Valley. The westbound mails addressed to California that left St. Joseph on May 20, May 27, June 3 and June 10 (Sunday departures) were carried as far west as possible and held until a military escort could accompany the riders beyond the dangerous part of the route. Five covers are recorded with these departure dates (FKW census W4, W5, W6, W7 and W10). One of these left St. Joseph on June 3, but was delivered to a military officer at Camp Floyd near Salt Lake City (W6), so it is technically not a cover delayed by the war.

The westbound trip departing from St. Joseph on Sunday, June 10, was the last scheduled Sunday departure, and it made it through to California after catching up with the three earlier mails. The Mountaineer 6/16/1860 reports the arrival of an express from the East in Salt Lake City at 8 p.m. on June 15, which fits with the June 10 departure. The Daily Alta California 6/24/1860 contains a report from Carson City dated June 23, which states, "The long missing Pony Express arrived at Carson City last evening, bringing dates from St. Louis to June 10th." The San Francisco Bulletin 6/25/1860 reported "The Pony Express will arrive here to-night about 10 o'clock, on board the Sacramento steamer. The Express will bring four several letter-bags--the number now due--and will have altogether 300 letters, at least" (boldface added for emphasis, original article shown opposite). This report confirms that the four delayed Pony mails arrived in San Francisco on June 25.

How did the express with the four mails, including this cover, travel westward to Carson City? A soldier named Charles A. Scott reported in his journal that the military escort of "20 picked men, well armed and mounted," which guarded the May 25 eastbound mail through hostile territory after they left Carson City on June 9, passed through Roberts' Creek on June 15. The convoy moved at a rate of approximately 40 miles per day, obviously a much slower pace than an individual Pony rider could achieve. The timing strongly indicates that the westbound mail, which had accumulated in the safe zone for weeks, was carried to Carson City with the same military escort on its return trip. The westbound express reached Carson City during the evening of June 22 (Daily Alta California 6/24/1860). Six days of travel points to a June 16 or 17 departure from somewhere near Ruby Valley, where the 4th Artillery had set up their base of operations.

Senator Milton S. Latham, who franked the cover, went to California in 1850 and was elected to Congress on the 1852 Democratic ticket. After his term expired, he declined to run for re-election and served as collector for the port of San Francisco. In 1859 he was elected governor, but he resigned five days after taking office to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant when Senator David C. Broderick was killed in a duel. It was during his term as a U.S. senator that Latham franked this cover addressed to his friend and fellow Democrat, General James W. Denver, who was the former territorial governor of Kansas, state senator and U.S. congressman, and who would be commissioned as a general in the Union army at the start of the Civil War.

Senator Latham was a friend of William H. Russell, the COC&PP president, and a strong supporter of their effort to secure the contract for the Central Route. He was among the few individuals later permitted to send Pony Express letters free of charge. In this case Senator Latham's free frank applied to the $5.00 Pony Express rate and U.S. postage. Six of the 16 recorded Pony Express covers with any form of free frank are signed by Latham (FKW E94, W3, W5, W7, W48 and W62). The eastbound cover (E94) has the San Francisco Running Pony oval. Three of the westbound Latham covers have the St. Joseph Running Pony oval (W3, W5 and W7), and two have the oval within circle datestamp (W48 and W62). The cover offered here is one of two Latham free-franked covers delayed by the Paiute Indian War (the other is dated May 27, FKW W5).

FKW Census W7. Ex Salzer, Vogel, Walske, Stach and "New Helvetia"

E. 50,000-75,000
Future Sale
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U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
 
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 9, Pony Express Covers, Double strikes of the San Francisco Running Pony oval

Pony Express, San Francisco, Dec. 5 (1860). Blue Running Pony oval datestamp struck twice on 10¢ Pale Green on Buff Nesbitt rebacked front (U16a) addressed to Lucien Birdseye, 39 Wall Street, New York City, dark blue "The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, San Francisco, Cal." dateless oval handstamp and pencil "1/2" half-ounce weight notation ($5.00 rate), carried on the Pony trip departing San Francisco on Wednesday, December 5, 1860, and arriving at St. Joseph 14 days later on December 19--a longer journey due to winter weather--entered mails with "Saint Joseph Mo. Dec. 21" double-circle datestamp and grid cancel on embossed stamp, flaps professionally added

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF SIX RECORDED PONY EXPRESS COVERS (OR FRONTS) WITH A DOUBLE STRIKE OF THE SAN FRANCISCO RUNNING PONY OVAL.

The FKW census lists six covers with the San Francisco Running Pony oval struck twice, all eastbound: E16, E38, E45 (offered here), E55 (second strike half complete), E87 (to Prince Edward Island, faint strike on stamps) and E108 (part strike on $2.00 Horse & Rider stamp).

The addressee, the Honorable Lucien Birdseye (1821-1896), was a prominent New York City attorney and State Supreme Court Justice.

FKW Census E45. Illustrated in Frajola-Kramer-Walske, The Pony Express: A Postal History (page 32). With 1979 P.F. certificate.

E. 5,000-7,500
Future Sale
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 10, Pony Express Covers, New York Office dated oval and St. Joseph Running Pony oval on a winter westbound Pony Express cover

California Pony Express, New-York, Dec. 11 (1860). Bold strike of greenish-blue oval datestamp on 3¢ Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) to Daniel Gibb & Company in San Francisco, sent to the eastern terminus at St. Joseph where "Pony Express, St. Joseph, Dec. 16" Running Pony oval datestamp was boldly struck at lower left, arithmetic notations applied at the offices of Gibb & Company, slight wear at top left corner

VERY FINE. A SPECTACULAR WESTBOUND COVER WITH THE RARE NEW YORK OFFICE DATED OVAL AND ST. JOSEPH RUNNING PONY DATESTAMP. ONLY TWO COVERS ARE RECORDED WITH THIS COMBINATION OF PONY EXPRESS MARKINGS.

Only 21 covers have the St. Joseph Running Pony oval struck on the front, including two in carmine and four eastbound covers (one of which is badly damaged). Of the 21, only two have this distinctive New York office oval with a date, and they are both dated December 11 (FKW W28 and W29).

The two December 11 covers were carried on the same trip to two different addresses in San Francisco. They were sent in a package of U.S. mail from New York City to the eastern terminus at St. Joseph. The under-3,000 miles "loophole" allowed westbound mail to be sent in bundles from the East Coast with only 3¢ U.S. postage. This loophole was closed by the Act of February 27, 1861, which eliminated the mileage provision and required 10¢ on any letter crossing the Rocky Mountains.

This cover and its twin were carried on the westbound trip from St. Joseph, departing Sunday, December 16, and arriving in San Francisco on December 31. According to the Sacramento Daily Union 12/31/1860, the express passed Placerville on December 30 and carried letter dates to December 14 and telegraph dispatches to Fort Kearney to December 18.

The addressee, Daniel Gibb & Company, was a large merchant firm in San Francisco. Daniel Gibb and his brother William purchased the original lease for the New Idria Quicksilver Mine and brought the mine into successful production in 1858. New Idria quickly became one of the world's largest mercury mines. The firm's warehouse at Front and Vallejo Street is a registered historic landmark building.

FKW Census W29. Illustrated in Coburn, Letters of Gold (page 77). Ex Dr. Polland and "Alyeska."

E. 15,000-20,000
Future Sale
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 14, Pony Express Covers, Red San Francisco Running Pony oval dated April 17, 1861-- carried on the first eastbound trip of the $2.00 rate period

Pony Express, San Francisco, Apr. 17 (1861). Running Pony oval datestamp in red clearly struck on 10¢ Green on White Nesbitt entire (U15) addressed to A. W. Canfield, care of George Updyke & Co., New York City, sender's directive "Pony Express", no indication of $2.00 rate, carried on the Pony trip that departed San Francisco on Wednesday, April 17, 1861, and arrived in St. Joseph on April 30, entered the mails with green "St. Joseph Mo. Apr. 30" circular datestamp, small opening slit at top, faint stain spot at bottom right

VERY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST EXAMPLES OF THE SAN FRANCISCO RUNNING PONY OVAL IN RED AND THE ONLY RECORDED RED STRIKE WITH A DATE. THIS APRIL 17, 1861, EASTBOUND TRIP FROM SAN FRANCISCO MARKED THE BEGINNING OF THE $2.00 PER HALF-OUNCE RATE PERIOD.

The April 17 trip was the first to occur in San Francisco after notice of the new $2.00 rate was received from St. Joseph by Pony Express. This marks the beginning of what postal historians call Rate Period 3, and it is also the early stage of Phase II, known as the Interim Phase, in which the Pony Express was operated as a joint private enterprise by COC&PP (now controlled by Holladay) and the Overland Mail Company, with Wells Fargo & Company acting as agents for the business. Starting on April 15, newspaper ads announced the new rates and that Wells Fargo would receive Pony Express mail (see first notice opposite).

The FKW census lists only five covers with the San Francisco Running Pony oval (SF-RP) struck in red instead of blue (see table below). The earliest has a blank date field and is used with the "Central Overland California & Pike's Peak Express Company, San Francisco, Cal." oval (SF-COCPP) dated March 20, 1861, also struck in red. The next sequential cover in the FKW census is an April 4, 1861, way-mail use from Sacramento without San Francisco markings. Following that are three covers sent from San Francisco on the same trip--April 13, 1861--each of which has the undated Running Pony oval in red and red SF-COCPP dated April 13. Finally, the fifth recorded cover (offered here) has a Running Pony red oval with the date inserted--April 17--and without the SF-COCPP oval. Two other covers from this April 17 trip are recorded (E69–offered in lot 15– and E70), both of which have the Running Pony dated oval struck in blue, not red. There are tiny flecks of blue ink present in the red strike on this cover. Changes in management and operations could be factors explaining why red ink was temporarily used by the San Francisco office.

From a collecting standpoint, this cover is the finest example of the red San Francisco Running Pony oval. An equally fine strike is found on the cover to England (E64), but the overseas use is of far greater significance and value. The strike on E63 is also very clear, but the upper right corner of the 10¢ entire has been cut out and repaired. The E61 and E65 covers have lightly inked strikes. The cover offered here (E67) is clearly struck with all details of the marking fully inked and visible.

FKW Census E67. Illustrated in Frajola-Kramer-Walske, The Pony Express: A Postal History (page 45). Ex Haas and "Edwards" (Grombacher). With 1966 P.F. certificate.

Covers with San Francisco Red Running Pony handstamp (all eastbound)
FKWSF-RP DateSF-COCPP Oval DateSt Jo CDS DateAddressStampFrank
E61Undated Red3/20/1861 Red4/4/1861 GreenBeers, NYCU16None
E63Undated Red4/13/1861 Red4/26/1861 GreenStark, New London CTU16WF Red
E64Undated Red4/13/1861 Red4/26/1861 GreenHubback, Liverpool GBNoneNone
E65Undated Red4/13/1861 Red4/26/1861 GreenCanfield, NYC35None
E674/17/1861 RedNone4/30/1861 GreenCanfield, NYCU15None

E. 20,000-30,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 15, Pony Express Covers, Blue San Francisco Running Pony oval dated April 17, 1861-- one of three carried on the first eastbound trip of the $2.00 rate period

Pony Express, San Francisco, Apr. 17 (1861). Running Pony oval datestamp in blue struck on 10¢ Green on Buff Nesbitt entire (U16) addressed to Charles Arthur Ely in Elyria, Ohio, no indication of $2.00 rate, carried on the Pony trip that departed San Francisco on Wednesday, April 17, 1861, and arrived in St. Joseph on April 30, entered the mails with bold green "St. Joseph Mo. Apr. 30" circular datestamp, with original letter enclosure datelined San Francisco, April 17, 1861, from Henry Leffingwell at 6 Montgomery Block, concerning debts incurred by Charles Ely and demanding reimbursement--"I send this by Pony, because I cannot wait any longer"

VERY FINE. THIS APRIL 17, 1861, EASTBOUND TRIP FROM SAN FRANCISCO MARKED THE BEGINNING OF THE $2.00 PER HALF-OUNCE RATE PERIOD. PONY EXPRESS COVERS WITH ORIGINAL LETTER ENCLOSURES ARE VERY RARE.

The April 17 trip was the first to occur in San Francisco after notice of the new $2.00 rate was received from St. Joseph by Pony Express. This marks the beginning of what postal historians call Rate Period 3, and it is also the early stage of Phase II, known as the Interim Phase, in which the Pony Express was operated as a joint private enterprise by COC&PP (now controlled by Holladay) and the Overland Mail Company, with Wells Fargo & Company acting as agents for the business. Starting on April 15, newspaper ads announced the new rates and that Wells Fargo & Company would receive Pony Express mail.

The FKW census lists three covers from this trip. Two have the San Francisco Running Pony oval struck in blue (the other cover has a partly restored address) The third is the cover offered in lot 14, which has the dated Running Pony oval in red with tiny flecks of blue ink. Changes in management and operations could be factors explaining why red ink was temporarily used by the San Francisco office.

Henry Leffingwell, a San Francisco real estate agent with offices at 6 Montgomery Block, was a frequent newspaper advertiser, offering properties for sale or rent. According to the letter, Leffingwell had provided considerable financial assistance to his friend, Charles A. Ely, and was demanding payment of the long overdue debt.

Information about Charles Arthur Ely (1829-1864) may be found at OhioHistory.org: "[he] was the son of Heman Ely, who founded the city of Elyria. Ely attended Elyria High School and at the Scientific School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was interested in science, and played a prominent role in creating both the Natural History Society of Elyria and the Lorain County Agricultural Society. In 1852 he visited South America as an agent for the Goodyear Rubber Company. Two years later he married Louise Caroline Foote in Cleveland, Ohio. Facing declining health, the Elys went on an extended trip to China at his doctor's orders. Returning to Elyria in 1860, Ely pursued several philanthropic causes. In his will he provided for the establishment of a public library, which opened in 1870."

FKW Census E69. Signed by Stanley B. Ashbrook and illustrated in his Special Service (pages 225-226, photo 120). Illustrated in Nathan-Boggs, The Pony Express (page 39). From our 1985 Rarities of the World sale (Sale 645, lot 8).

E. 5,000-7,500
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2018-10-25
United States and CSA Postal History
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2077, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressPony Express, St. Joseph, Aug. 30 (1860), Pony Express, St. Joseph, Aug. 30 (1860)Pony Express, St. Joseph, Aug. 30 (1860). Mostly clear strike of Carmine Running Pony oval datestamp struck on back of cover, manuscript "Placerville Cal. Aug. 19" postmark and "Paid $2.50" in same hand on 10c Green on Buff Nesbitt entire (U16) to Fredonia N.Y., "Saint Joseph Mo. Aug. 31, 1860" circular datestamp struck upon entering the mails, expertly restored around edges with some paper extension at left, but the back with the Carmine Running Pony handstamp is original

FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF TEN RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE RUNNING PONY HANDSTAMP STRUCK IN CARMINE.

The St. Joseph Running Pony handstamp was normally struck in black. The Frajola-Kramer-Walske census records ten covers with this marking struck in the distinctive Carmine color. They are dated from August 12 to September 13, 1860, and all but two are struck on the backs of the covers. Six are eastbound trips. This cover was picked up as way mail along the route at the Placerville station and carried on the eastbound trip that left San Francisco on August 18, 1860, arriving in St. Joseph on August 30.

FKW Census E14. Trip ET-23. Ex Walske. With 1966 P.F. certificate

E. 10,000-15,000
0
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U.S. Stamps
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Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2018-10-03
United States Stamp Treasures: The William H. Gross Collection
c
Sale Number 1188, Lot Number 51, The Pony Express, including Russell Free Frank and $2.00 to Prince Edward IslandA truly historic piece of Western Americana--this telegraph envelope with the St. Joseph Running Pony marking is free franked by William H, A truly historic piece of Western Americana--this telegraph envelope with the St. Joseph Running Pony marking is free franked by William HA truly historic piece of Western Americana--this telegraph envelope with the St. Joseph Running Pony marking is free franked by William H. Russell, the driving force behind the legendary Pony Express, and addressed to Ben Holladay, the “Stagecoach King” and Russell’s biggest creditor

DESCRIPTION

“PONY EXPRESS/ST. JOSEPH/MAY 6” Running Pony oval handstamp, the first recorded use of this marking on westbound mail, perfect strike on 1860 buff “TELEGRAM BY THE STEBBINS LINE.” imprint cover signed “Free W H Russell” at center by William H. Russell, one of the three co-founders of the Pony Express, neatly addressed to Ben Holladay in San Francisco with sender’s notations “Free on Pony” (referring to the $5 Pony Express charge), “Paid” (referring to the telegraph charges) and “from W H Russell” (in addition to Russell’s free frank); carried on the fifth westbound Pony Express trip from St. Joseph, Missouri, which departed on Sunday, May 6, 1860, and arrived in Sacramento (and San Francisco) on Tuesday, May 15; the express rider who carried this telegraph despatch in the mochilla crossed the war zone in Nevada around May 13--one week later, the route was closed down as Paiute Indians attacked stations and riders between Cold Springs and Roberts’ Creek

PROVENANCE

* Robert S. Emerson, Daniel F. Kelleher, 1/31/1938, Sale 396, lot 281, to Knapp

* Edward S. Knapp, Parke-Bernet Galleries, May 5-10, 1941, lot 1548

* Provenance not known between 1941 and 1969 (possibly Jessup and Pearce; not listed on the B. D. Phillips inventory)

* Siegel Auction Galleries, 1969 Rarities of the World, 3/25/1969, Sale 350, lot 228

* Provenance not known between 1969 and 1989 (owned at times by Weill, but not part of the Grombacher collection sold in 1991 as the “Edwards” collection)

* Weills Brothers’ Stock, Christie’s Robson Lowe, 10/12/1989, lot 342, to Dr. Test

* Dr. Charles E. Test (“Concord”), 1994 Rarities of the World, 5/19/1994, Sale 759, lot 77, to William H. Gross

CENSUS, LITERATURE AND EXHIBITION REFERENCES

* Frajola-Kramer-Walske census no. W2 (illustrated on p. 16)--the finest of three recorded Russell free franked Pony Express covers: W2 , W14 and W24

* Scott R. Trepel, “The Impact of Indian Attacks on the Pony Express in 1860,” published by Siegel Auction Galleries, fig. 12, p. 12

CERTIFICATION

* The Philatelic Foundation (1994)

CONDITION NOTES

* Extremely Fine strike and overall condition; bottom flap has been removed and there is a small patched spot at bottom edge of cover “RSE” in circle (Emerson) and “R.H.W. Co.” (Weill) handstamps on back

VIEW PDF OF HISTORY AND COMMENTARY at https://siegelauctions.com/2018/1188/51.pdf

E. 75,000-100,000
155,000
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Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2014-06-24
The New Helvetia Collection of Western Expresses
c
Sale Number 1072, Lot Number 40, 1860-61 Transcontinental Pony ExpressPony Express, San Francisco, Sep. 29 (1860), Pony Express, San Francisco, Sep. 29 (1860)Pony Express, San Francisco, Sep. 29 (1860). Clear strike of blue Running Pony oval datestamp, pencil “1/4” (quarter ounce, $2.50 rate) on 10c Pale Green on Buff Nesbitt entire (U16a) to Henry I. Beers at a New York City post office box, sender’s directive “Per Pony Express”, after an 11-day trip the “The Central Overland California & Pikes Peak Express Company, St. Joseph, Mo. Oct. 10” oval datestamp was applied on the day of arrival, “Saint Joseph Mo. Oct. 11, 1860” double-circle datestamp, backflap removed, opened and rejoined at sides, small repaired opening nick at top edge well clear of markings

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. AN ATTRACTIVE PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH A CLEAR STRIKE OF THE SAN FRANCISCO RUNNING PONY HANDSTAMP.

This cover was carried on the Saturday, September 29, 1860, trip from San Francisco. The addressee, Henry I. Beers, was a prominent California businessman who returned to New York in 1859 and made his fortune in oil and real estate in Western Pennsylvania.

FKW Census E21. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Stach. With 2004 P.F. certificate

E. 10,000-15,000
10,500
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2013-12-19
United States Postal History
c
Sale Number 1063, Lot Number 1834, Western Mails cont: Transcontinental and Virginia City Pony Express“Pony Express, St. Joseph. Oct. 4” (1860), “Pony Express, St. Joseph. Oct. 4” (1860)“Pony Express, St. Joseph. Oct. 4” (1860). Sharp but lightly inked strike of Running Pony oval datestamp on 3c Red on Buff Star Die entire (U27) from New York City to D. Gibb & Co. in San Francisco, red “California Pony Express Paid” double-line oval handstamp applied at New York, sender’s note “Private”, tiny scrape at top

VERY FINE. ONE OF SIX RECORDED PONY COVERS WITH THE NEW YORK RED “PAID” OVAL HANDSTAMP USED IN COMBINATION WITH THE ST. JOSEPH RUNNING PONY OVAL.

There are three interesting features of this cover. First, westbound Pony covers are rarer than eastbound, and only twelve are listed in the FKW census with the New York oval “Paid” handstamp, of which six are struck in combination with the St. Joseph Running Pony oval. Second, this cover demonstrates the “under 3,000 miles” loophole that allowed westbound mail to be sent in bundles from the East Coast to St. Joseph by mail with only 3c U.S. postage. This loophole was closed by the Act of February 27, 1861, which eliminated the mileage provision and required 10c postage on any letter crossing the Rocky Mountains. A third unusual feature of this cover is the date change in the St. Joseph oval. Close examination reveals that the “SEP” month slug was used in the oval and was over-struck by “OCT” in a separate operation. October 4, 1860, is the correct date.

FKW Census W17. Trip WT-41. Illustrated in Pony Express--The Great Gamble, Roy S. Bloss (endpapers). Ex Caspary, Beals, Kramer and Twigg-Smith. With 1996 P.F. certificate.

E. 15,000-20,000
11,000
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FILTER: All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = Running Pony

34 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 4


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