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97 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 10
5 of your results are from upcoming Sale No. 1207

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FILTER: All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 143L3
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
ngbl
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 20, Pony Express Covers, $1.00 Red block of four with the Broken Leg variety

Wells Fargo & Company Pony Express, $1.00 Red, Broken Leg (143L3 var). Position R9 upper left stamp in block of four (R9-10/13-14), unused (no gum), large margins, bright color, tiny pinhole in bottom left stamp does not affect the variety or the appearance of this beautiful block

EXTREMELY FINE BLOCK OF THE PONY EXPRESS $1.00 HORSE & RIDER ISSUE CONTAINING THE ONLY MAJOR FLAW ON THE PRINTING STONE OF 40 SUBJECTS--THE BROKEN LEG VARIETY.

This is the most distinctive plate flaw found on any Pony Express stamp. Only nine examples are known to us, including four locked up in full sheets. Blocks containing the Broken Leg variety are extremely rare.

E. 1,500-2,000
Future Sale
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 22, Pony Express Covers, The Pony Express cover that traveled in both directions between Folsom and Sacramento on the first trip of the government contract period

Wells Fargo & Company Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Position L1, ample margins, bright shade, small tear at top and diagonal crease at lower right, tied by clear strike of blue "Wells, Fargo & Co. Express, Folsom" oval handstamp, bold strike of blue "Pony Express, Sacramento, Jul. 4" (1861) oval datestamp on 10¢ Green on White Star Die entire (U32) with Wells Fargo & Company printed red frank, addressed to Miss Drucilla A. Beach, Massena, New York, pen cancel on embossed stamp, no post office markings, carried with the mail that left San Francisco on July 3, 1861, the first trip under the new government mail contract--with original letters datelined at Folsom, the first on July 1 from Mrs. E. D. Shirland, cousin of Charles R. Shirland, and the second on July 3 from Charles; Mrs. Shirland writes: "My Dear Cousin, If not cousin now I hope it soon will be as Cousin Charlie has informed me of an engagement existing between yourself and him. He also has told me of his intentions of sending for you to come to California" and warns her to avoid travelers who are "not fit companions for a lady to associate with"; Charles informs Drucilla that he has sent her $50 and another $350 draft (the receipt for this Wells Fargo draft is located in their archives), explains her travel arrangements, and states that it is 2:00 p.m. (on July 3) and "the Pony starts on his journey overland to the Eastern states at 4 o'clock."

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED PONY EXPRESS COVER FROM FOLSOM, WHICH MADE A JOURNEY IN BOTH DIRECTIONS--24 MILES WEST FROM FOLSOM TO SACRAMENTO, WHERE IT WAS PLACED IN THE MOCHILLA, THEN BACK EAST TO FOLSOM AND ONWARD FROM PLACERVILLE BY PONY EXPRESS ON THE FIRST TRIP UNDER THE NEW GOVERNMENT CONTRACT.

The government awarded the mail contract along the Central Route to the Overland Mail Company on March 12, 1861, effective July 1. The contract paid $1,000,000 per year for mail/passenger service along the Central Route and required the company "...during the continuance of their Contract, or until completion of The Overland telegraph, to run a Pony Express semi-weekly at a Schedule time of ten days eight months of the year and twelve days four months of the year, and to convey for the Government free of charge five pounds of Mail Matter; with liberty of charging the public for transportation of letters by said express not exceeding One dollar per half ounce..."

This period of operation is known as Phase III, which corresponds to Rate Period 4 (July 1-October 24, 1861). On July 1 Wells Fargo & Co. issued new stamps and envelopes to reflect the agreed-upon government contract rate for the Pony Express. The fee for Pony Express service between Placerville and St. Joseph (or Atchison) could not exceed $1.00 per half-ounce. If Wells Fargo & Co. carried the letter by express to or from Placerville (for example, from San Francisco), an extra express fee was charged. If the sender used one of Wells Fargo & Co.'s stamped envelopes with the printed frank and 10¢ embossed postage, the total amount paid was $1.20 ($1.00 for Pony Express service plus 20¢ for additional express charge and postage). The Wells Fargo ad noted that "letters not enclosed as above [in government franked envelopes] will be charged at the rate of 25 cents each [in addition to the $1.00 Pony Express fee]." Since the July 1 commencement date of the new contract was known well in advance at both the eastern and western terminal offices, the $1.00 rate went into effect simultaneously, and new stamps were ready for the first eastbound trip.

The first trip under the new contract was an eastbound departure from San Francisco on July 3. It is not known when this mail arrived in St. Joseph, but the Confederate bushwackers' destruction of rail lines and bridges on the Hannibal & St. Louis Railroad had already caused disruptions, presaging the Platte Bridge Railroad Tragedy of September 1861 which prompted the relocation of the eastern terminus from St. Joseph to Atchison. Another cover from this trip is known, with a San Francisco July 3 Running Pony datestamp (FKW E109, Siegel Sale 979, lot 30). Both covers entered the mail without datestamps; the July 3 cover was cancelled on arrival with a New York City grid, and this July 4 cover was pen-cancelled.

The unusual east-to-west and west-to-east journey this cover took is probably best explained by the timing. Rather than hold the cover until the Pony mochilla passed through Folsom, it was sent by train to Sacramento to meet the express there. The Sacramento office applied its July 4 oval datestamp and the cover made its way back to Folsom and on to Placerville, where the Pony relay started.

FKW Census E110. Illustrated in Coburn, Letters of Gold (page 259) and Frajola-Kramer-Walske, The Pony Express: A Postal History (page 60). Ex Haas. With 1982 P.F. certificate.

E. 30,000-40,000
Future Sale
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 25, Pony Express Covers, The only recorded Pony Express cover datestamped at Stockton, California-- carried by riverboat to San Francisco by "Chips" Hodgkins

Wells Fargo & Company Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Position L3 (shows white flaw in scroll line above "CO."), full even margins, bright shade, tied by mostly clear strike of blue "Wells, Fargo & Co., Stockton, Sep. 3" double-oval datestamp on 10¢ Green on Buff Star Die entire (U33) with Wells Fargo & Company printed red frank, addressed to Mrs. Caroline Taylor, care of Mrs. Mary R. Stow, Geneva, New York, red "T. Robinson Bours & Co., Bankers, Stockton" red oval handstamp, carried on the Pony trip that departed San Francisco on Wednesday, September 4, 1861, and arrived in St. Joseph on September 17, entered the mails with perfect bold strike of "St. Joseph Mo. Sep. 17" circular datestamp, accompanying certificate notes $1.00 has diagonal tear at bottom right, entire with corner repair at top left and a sealed 6mm horizontal cut at the center of the Stockton oval--none of these are apparent

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. THE ONLY RECORDED PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH A STOCKTON OFFICE MARKING. A COLORFUL USE OF THE $1.00 RED HORSE & RIDER STAMP.

After Wells Fargo & Company became involved in the operation of the Pony Express in April 1861, their offices began acting as feeder lines to the Pony Express. Examples of Pony covers with markings of Wells Fargo offices that were not actually located on the route are rare. The FKW census lists covers from Marysville, Nevada City (California), Mt. Ophir and Yreka, and this Stockton cover was added as E154A soon after it first came to light in 2009. Other covers are known with Wells Fargo markings from offices on the Pony route, such as Sacramento, Placerville, Folsom and others in Nevada Territory.

Stockton is located on the San Joaquin River east of San Francisco--the trip by riverboat in 1861 took about eight hours. At this time the Wells Fargo riverboat messenger in Stockton was Pilsbury "Chips" Hodgkins (1825-1892). Mail for the Pony Express left Stockton at 6:00 a.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays, in order to reach San Francisco in time for the eastbound departures. This cover was datestamped on Tuesday, September 3, and presumably was carried by Hodgkins on that day or the next morning. The $1.00 Red stamp paid the Pony Express rate, and the entire with the red frank paid the Wells Fargo charge for service to San Francisco.

On the day this cover was datestamped at Stockton--September 3--an incident occured 2,000 miles away that would have a significant consequence for the Pony Express. Confederate bushwackers, who had been destroying rail lines and bridges on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad since June, attempted to burn the support columns of the bridge over the Platte River. The sabotage caused a westbound train to derail and plunge 30 feet into the shallow river, killing 20 and injuring 100 more. As a result of this attack, the eastern terminus of the mail route was moved from St. Joseph to Atchison, Kansas. The September 11 eastbound Pony mail from San Francisco was the first to be postmarked at Atchison.

FKW Census E154A. With 2009 P.F. certificate.

E. 10,000-15,000
Future Sale
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 26, Pony Express Covers, The penultimate Pony Express mail from California with a $1.00 Red Horse & Rider stamp cancelled at Sacramento

Wells Fargo & Company Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Position R5 with interpane margin at left, large even margins all around, bright shade, tied by clear strike of blue "Pony Express, Sacramento, Oct. 20" (1861) oval datestamp on 10¢ Yellow Green on Buff "Pumpkin" entire (U41) with Wells Fargo & Company printed red frank, addressed to Miss Sarah E. Tukey, care of C. H. Hudson, Boston, Massachusetts, carried with the mail that left San Francisco on Saturday, October 19, 1861, reached Sacramento on October 20 and arrived in Atchison on November 4, entered the mails with unusually clear strike of "Atchison Kan. Nov. 4" double-circle datestamp, two repaired tears at top--one 35mm long to right of stamp but not affecting it, other at center into "D" of "PAID" in red frank--some gum staining around stamp has been removed

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. AN ATTRACTIVE PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH THE $1.00 RED HORSE & RIDER ISSUE THAT WAS CARRIED ON THE SECOND TO LAST EASTBOUND TRIP FROM SAN FRANCISCO.

Construction of the transcontinental telegraph line started at each end and worked toward the middle. As the gap closed, telegraph messages carried by Pony Express were conveyed as soon as they reached the first office with the capacity to send messsages by wire. On August 6, 1861, the San Francisco Bulletin printed over its dispatches, "By telegraph to Fort Kearney from St. Louis, thence by Pony Express to Robert's Creek Station, thence by telegraph to San Francisco." In the August 13, 1861, edition, the same paper reported that the Pony Express rider was leaving his dispatches for the Bulletin and other Pacific Coast newspapers at Dry Creek station. By the beginning of September, hundreds of miles were cut from the distance between telegraph terminals on the Pony route. The eastern section of the telegraph was completed on October 17, 1861, and just one week later the final connection was made on October 24.

As soon as messages could be sent by wire, the need for the Pony Express was eliminated, and the Overland Mail Company was contractually free to discontinue the money-losing service. The last trip from San Francisco left on October 23. On October 25 the Wells Fargo & Co. office in San Francisco announced that the "Last Pony coming this way left Atchison, Kansas, yesterday [October 24]." They probably received that news by wire. After October 24, westbound Pony Express mail from the eastern terminus was carried by stage, despite the fact that the company was still collecting its $1.00 per half-ounce fee. The letters that were bagged at St. Joseph for the October 27 and 31 trips arrived in San Francisco on November 18 and 21, in line with the usual 20-day transit time by stage.

FKW Census E179. Illustrated in Nathan-Boggs, The Pony Express (page 55). Raymond H. Weill Co. backstamp. Ex Franklin D. Roosevelt and Haub. With 2016 P.F. certificate.

E. 10,000-15,000
Future Sale
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2019-09-25
Outstanding Pony Express Covers from the George J. Kramer Collection
c
Sale Number 1207, Lot Number 27, Pony Express Covers, The only known Wells Fargo & Company surcharge frank sent by Pony Express

Wells Fargo & Company Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Position R17, large top margin, other sides clear to slightly in, tied by blue "Pony Express, San Francisco, Aug. 7" (1861) Running Pony oval datestamp on 10¢ Green on White Star Die rebacked front (U32) with Wells Fargo & Company printed red frank and "PAID 50 Cts." surcharge overprint, addressed to Mrs. N. K. Samson, care of Ira Richards, 177 Broadway, New York City, sender's notation "V M Richards" at lower left, carried on the Pony trip that departed San Francisco on Wednesday, August 7, 1861, and arrived in St. Joseph on August 19, entered the mails in New York City with that post office's grid cancel on embossed stamp, all backflaps expertly added to make this front appear as a complete cover

VERY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE WELLS FARGO & COMPANY SURCHARGED ENTIRE USED ON THE TRANSCONTINENTAL PONY EXPRESS.

The "PAID 50 Cts." surcharge is one of several varieties overprinted on Wells Fargo & Company franked entires to indicate a premium rate for service--for example, for letters to and from the Boise Mines in Idaho Territory. Some of these surcharged entires are found with markings indicating that they were used for the service for which they were intended. Others, such as the example offered here, were probably used as an expediency--whether the 50¢ premium was paid and used toward the Pony Express fee, we cannot say, since the $1.00 Red stamp would have covered the fee.

We have been unable to locate any information regarding the addressee, but Ira Richards & Co. was a large jewelry maker in Attleboro, Massachusetts, which had an office at this Broadway location. The name V. M. Richards, written at lower left, does not appear in genealogical sources we consulted, but is assumed to be a relative traveling in California at the time.

FKW Census E137. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein.

E. 5,000-7,500
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2018-10-25
United States and CSA Postal History
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2086, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Ample margins to slightly in at bottom, deep rich color, tied by blue "Pony Express San Francisco Aug. 3" (1861) Running Pony oval datestamp on 10c Green on Buff Star Die entire (U33) with Wells, Fargo & Co. red printed frank, addressed to Westfield Mass., entered regular mails with "New-York Aug. 18" circular datestamp, forwarded to Saratoga Springs N.Y. with 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), grid cancel and "Westfield Ms. Aug. 20, 1861" circular datestamp, manuscript July 21 receipt on back, inconsequential horizontal file bend does not affect stamps or markings

EXTREMELY FINE. AN OUTSTANDING EASTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH THE $1.00 RED HORSE & RIDER STAMP AND 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE FOR FORWARDING POSTAGE, IN EXCEPTIONALLY CHOICE CONDITION.

Commencing July 1, 1861, the Pony Express was authorized by Congress to carry mail at the rate of $1.00 per half ounce. An additional fee was charged by Wells, Fargo & Co. to carry mail from San Francisco to the western terminus at Placerville, which is represented by their red printed frank on this entire. The contract also stipulated the mandatory U.S. postage charge of 10c per half ounce. This cover combines all three postage elements plus the additional element of a 3c 1857 stamp for forwarding postage. It was carried on the August 3, 1861 eastbound Pony Express trip after the new rates and stamps were introduced.

Although the Scott Catalogue lists the July 1861 issue Pony Express stamps (143L3-143L6) with other private post issues, we wish to emphasize that these stamps were issued under the terms of a government mail contract; therefore, they have semi-official status.

FKW Census E133. Trip ET-123. Ex Dale-Lichtenstein and Walske. With 2006 P.F. certificate

E. 30,000-40,000
30,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2018-10-25
United States and CSA Postal History
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2087, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Large margins to just in at right, affixed over "PAID" in oval handstamp applied by Wells, Fargo & Co. office, tied by blue "Pony Express San Francisco Oct. 5" (1861) Running Pony oval datestamp on 10c Green on Buff Nesbitt Die entire (U33) addressed to Miss Ellen F. Cooper, care of General Cooper, Charlestown Mass, with Wells, Fargo & Co. red printed frank, manuscript "Per Pony Express" and "Oct. 2, 1861 Recd San Francisco October 4, 1861" written before stamp was affixed and cover was sent by Pony Express (it must have originated outside of San Francisco), entered mails with "Atchison Kan. Oct. 19" double-circle datestamp, small edge tears and opened on three sides

VERY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL EASTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVER WITH THE $1.00 RED HORSE & RIDER ISSUE. A RARE USE VIA THE ATCHISON POST OFFICE.

This cover to Ellen F. Cooper was probably sent by her future husband, E.W. Chapin. Commencing July 1, 1861, the Pony Express was authorized by Congress to carry mail at the rate of $1.00 per half ounce. An additional fee was charged by Wells, Fargo & Co. to carry mail from San Francisco to the western terminus at Placerville, which is represented by their printed frank on this entire. The contract also stipulated the mandatory U.S. postage charge of 10c per half ounce. This cover nicely combines all three postage elements and was carried on the October 5, 1861 eastbound Pony Express trip, arriving Atchison, Kansas, on October 19. By September 1861 the transcontinental railroad had reached Atchison, which became the post-office entry point for Pony Express mail.

Although the Scott Catalogue lists the July 1861 issue Pony Express stamps (143L3-143L6) with other private post issues, we wish to emphasize that these stamps were issued under the terms of a government mail contract; therefore, they have semi-official status.

FKW Census E171. Trip ET-141. Ex Walske. With 2006 P.F. certificate

E. 15,000-20,000
0
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2018-10-25
United States and CSA Postal History
c
Sale Number 1191, Lot Number 2088, Trans-Continental Pony ExpressWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Ample margins to slightly in at bottom corners, tied by slightly blurry strike of blue "Wells, Fargo & Co. Gold Hill N.T. Sep. 24" (ca. 1863) oval datestamp on sealed 3c Pink on Buff entire (U35) with Wells, Fargo & Co. black printed frank, paste-up use without address (see below for explanation), most of the brown adhesive on back remains (confirming paste-up use), part of flap missing due to removal from the larger envelope to which it was pasted

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED USE OF A WELLS, FARGO & CO. 1861 $1.00 TRANSCONTINENTAL PONY EXPRESS STAMP ON A VIRGINIA CITY PONY EXPRESS COVER. A FASCINATING POSTAL HISTORY RARITY.

Following the termination of the transcontinental Pony Express in October 1861, Wells, Fargo & Co., in August 1862, established a supplemental service to their normal express business between San Francisco and Virginia City, Nevada Territory (in the Washoe mining area). The Virginia City Pony Express used horses to carry mail from Virginia City to Placerville, where it was put on a train to Sacramento and then on a steamboat to San Francisco. The service significantly cut the time for carriage of letters by this route. Wells, Fargo & Co. issued adhesive stamps for the service, which at first cost 10c per letter and then 25c beginning in February 1863 (Scott Nos. 143L7-143L9). The stamps were of the same Horse & Rider design as the dollar-value stamps used for the earlier transcontinental Pony Express service.

When the cover offered here was sent, the single rate via Virginia City Pony Express was 25c. Gold Hill was on the Virginia City route and that office's datestamp was used to cancel the $1.00 stamp. The most logical explanation is that this 3c entire was pasted to a larger plain envelope with heavy contents. The blurred Gold Hill oval datestamp is consistent with being struck on something softer than a single letter. The larger cover would have had the address and an additional 9c in U.S. postage for the quadruple rate. In order to pay the quadruple Virginia City Pony Express rate, the sender (or agent at Gold Hill) affixed a leftover 1861 $1.00 Pony Express stamp, rather than four Virginia City 25c stamps. In theory, remainders in the hands of Wells, Fargo & Co. agents could have been used for multiple rates on the Virginia City route. Theory has become reality with the emergence of this Virginia City cover. It is the only known cover franked with the 1861 $1.00 Pony Express stamp paying the 1862-65 Virginia City express rate. It is also the only cover recorded with a dollar-value Pony Express stamp that was not used on the transcontinental Pony Express route. We are grateful to Richard Frajola for his assistance in interpreting this cover.

With 2018 P.F. certificate

E. 3,000-4,000
2,200
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2018-06-27
2018 Rarities of the World
c
Sale Number 1185, Lot Number 108, RevenuesWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Ample margins to slightly in at bottom corners, tied by slightly blurry strike of blue "Wells, Fargo & Co. Gold Hill N.T. Sep. 24" (ca. 1863) oval datestamp on sealed 3c Pink on Buff entire (U35) with Wells, Fargo & Co. black printed frank, paste-up use without address (see below for explanation), most of the brown adhesive on back remains (confirming paste-up use), part of flap missing due to removal from the larger envelope to which it was pasted

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED USE OF A WELLS, FARGO & CO. 1861 $1.00 TRANSCONTINENTAL PONY EXPRESS STAMP ON A VIRGINIA CITY PONY EXPRESS COVER. A FASCINATING POSTAL HISTORY RARITY.

Following the termination of the transcontinental Pony Express in October 1861, Wells, Fargo & Co., in August 1862, established a supplemental service to their normal express business between San Francisco and Virginia City, Nevada Territory (in the Washoe mining area). The Virginia City Pony Express used horses to carry mail from Virginia City to Placerville, where it was put on a train to Sacramento and then on a steamboat to San Francisco. The service significantly cut the time for carriage of letters by this route. Wells, Fargo & Co. issued adhesive stamps for the service, which at first cost 10c per letter and then 25c beginning in February 1863 (Scott Nos. 143L7-143L9). The stamps were of the same Horse & Rider design as the dollar-value stamps used for the earlier transcontinental Pony Express service.

When the cover offered here was sent, the single rate via Virginia City Pony Express was 25c. Gold Hill was on the Virginia City route and that office's datestamp was used to cancel the $1.00 stamp. The most logical explanation is that this 3c entire was pasted to a larger plain envelope with heavy contents. The blurred Gold Hill oval datestamp is consistent with being struck on something softer than a single letter. The larger cover would have had the address and an additional 9c in U.S. postage for the quadruple rate. In order to pay the quadruple Virginia City Pony Express rate, the sender (or agent at Gold Hill) affixed a leftover 1861 $1.00 Pony Express stamp, rather than four Virginia City 25c stamps. In theory, remainders in the hands of Wells, Fargo & Co. agents could have been used for multiple rates on the Virginia City route. Theory has become reality with the emergence of this Virginia City cover. It is the only known cover franked with the 1861 $1.00 Pony Express stamp paying the 1862-65 Virginia City express rate. It is also the only cover recorded with a dollar-value Pony Express stamp that was not used on the transcontinental Pony Express route. We are grateful to Richard Frajola for his assistance in interpreting this cover.

With 2018 P.F. certificate

E. 7,500-10,000
0
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Carriers, Locals and Independent Mails
2018-05-22
United States and Confederate States Postal History
 
Sale Number 1182, Lot Number 155, Carriers & LocalsWells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3), Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3)Wells, Fargo & Co. Pony Express, $1.00 Red (143L3). Ample margins to touched at bottom, tied by blue "Pony Express San Francisco Jul. 13" (1861) Running Pony oval datestamp on full corner of (10c) Buff entire with about half of Wells, Fargo & Co. red printed frank, the full cover was mailed to Europe, back with strikes of two European transit datestamps including Switzerland and another (possibly Ticino region), Very Fine and desirable, only six full Pony Express covers are recorded addressed to foreign countries, this was a $500,000 cover before it was reduced to a piece

E. 750-1,000
425
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FILTER: All Sale Dates thru 2020/01/01, Catalogue = 143L3

97 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 10


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