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61 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 7

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, All Sale Dates thru 2011/10/11, Catalogue = c3a
Area/Sub/
General/Issue
Sale#/
Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2011-06-18
2011 Rarities of the World
120°
PSE 85
PF 85
og
Sale Number 1010, Lot Number 120, 1918 24-Cent Inverted Jenny24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 35, unusually choice centering with wide and well-balanced margins on all sides, fresh and bright colors, small hinged area

EXTREMELY FINE. A REMARKABLY FRESH AND BEAUTIFULLY CENTERED EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY". THIS STAMP IS ONE OF THE BEST-CENTERED POSITIONS FROM THE DISCOVERY SHEET.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and at least seven have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner. This example is remarkable for its pristine state of preservation and for its centering, equalled by only a few stamps in the original sheet (almost all of the others have disturbed gum or faults).

Ex Steffan and Bruechig. With 1969 and 2005 P.F. certificates (the latter graded VF-XF 85) and 2005 P.S.E. certificate (OGph, VF-XF 85; SMQ $810,000.00). The P.S.E. Population Report lists only one graded 95, one graded 85 (this stamp) and two graded 80, followed by others in lower grades.

500,000
350,000
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2009-09-29
United States Stamps
og
Sale Number 976, Lot Number 2225, Air Post (Scott C1-C12, including Inverted Jenny)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 26, slightly disturbed original gum, rich colors, small indentations at top described on accompanying certificate as "few small horizontal creases at top"

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY..

According to Jenny! by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), William T. Robey purchased the original sheet of 100 inverted "Jenny" stamps on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was placed on sale, at the New York Avenue Post Office window in Washington, D.C. Soon after, the sheet was sold to Col. Edward H. R. Green through Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Green paid $20,000 for the sheet, then instructed Klein to divide it into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Stamp specialists and professionals know that examples of this stamp come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors over the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinging has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and at least seven have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

Ex Colonel Edward H.R. Green and offered in Part XX by Laurence and Stryker in March 1945 where purchased by Philip Ward for a customer who held it for decades. With 1993 P.F. certificate

500,000
0
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2009-04-27
The "Laila" Collection of United States Stamps
og
Sale Number 972, Lot Number 3388, Air Post, including the Inverted Jenny24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 64, lightly hinged with a small narrow remnant, deep rich colors, one unpunched perf disk at left

VERY FINE. A BRIGHT AND FRESH WELL-CENTERED EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS INVERTED JENNY.

According to Jenny! by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), William T. Robey purchased the original sheet of 100 inverted "Jenny" stamps on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was placed on sale, at the New York Avenue Post Office window in Washington, D.C. Soon after, the sheet was sold to Col. Edward H. R. Green through Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Green paid $20,000 for the sheet, then instructed Klein to divide it into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

Stamp specialists and professionals know that examples of this stamp come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors over the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinging has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and at least seven have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

This stamp is in an extraordinary state of freshness, with excellent color, bright paper and clean fresh gum with only a small hinged area.

Ex Haydon and Col. Aisenstadt. With 2000 P.F. certificate

500,000
375,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2008-10-28
The Perry Hansen Collection of U.S. Stamps and Covers
og
Sale Number 963, Lot Number 1062, Air Post24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 36, single light hinge mark, the gum and paper are fresh and bright, brilliant colors

FRESH AND FINE-VERY FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here, Position 36, is exceptionally fresh and very lightly hinged. It was part of the Sidney A. Hessel collection sold by H. R. Harmer (Part 3, November 305, 1976, lot 1075). Hessel, a long-time collector, might have been the first person to acquire this position when the sheet was broken up by Eugene Klein in 1918 (there is no sale record prior to Hessel's ownership). This would explain its exceptionally fresh condition and the presence of a single faint hinge mark. After the Hessel sale, the stamp was owned by Kenneth Wenger, a New Jersey stamp dealer and investor. It eventually became part of the Windsor collection, which was acquired intact by Perry Hansen.

Ex Hessel, Wenger and Windsor. With 1978, 1996 and 2008 P.F. certificates.

500,000
337,500
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2008-06-07
2008 Rarities of the World
og
Sale Number 958, Lot Number 706, Air Post, including Inverted Jenny Position 2124c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 21 with selvage at left, single light hinge mark at top left on part of selvage and part of stamp, the rest of the gum is absolutely pristine, brilliant colors, tiny thin speck in selvage only which is not mentioned on accompanying certificate

FRESH AND FINE-VERY FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

The stamp offered here, Position 21 with the left sheet selvage, is exceptionally fresh and very lightly hinged. The attached selvage immediately identifies it as a stamp from the far left vertical row.

Ex Lehman. With 1977 Robson Lowe certificate of opinion and 2008 P.F. certificate.

400,000
400,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2008-05-08
The Jay Hoffman Collection of United States Stamps
534
PSE 70
og
Sale Number 956, Lot Number 534, Air Post24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 24, rich colors on bright paper, fresh original gum, single hinge mark

FRESH AND FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY" ERROR. WITHOUT QUESTION THIS IS THE MOST FAMOUS STAMP IN AMERICAN PHILATELY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

Ex Frank B. Allen and Hewitt. With 1985 P.F. and 2005 P.S.E. certificates (Fine 70). The SMQ value in Fine 70 is $380,000.00, but it jumps to $650,000.00 in VF 80 (F-VF 75 is not priced). Based on recent market activity and the attractiveness of this sound example of the Inverted "Jenny", we think it will probably outperform its current SMQ value.

400,000
300,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2007-11-12
United States Stamps
1305
PF 85
og
Sale Number 946, Lot Number 1305, Air Post24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 57, rich colors on bright paper, fresh original gum, small light trace of hinging

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE BEST-CENTERED AND FRESHEST STAMPS FROM THE ORIGINAL SHEET OF 100. FOR THE COLLECTOR SEEKING THE FINEST QUALITY, THIS STAMP IS THE IDEAL INVERTED "JENNY".

The original sheet of 100 was discovered and acquired by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue post office in Washington D.C. on May 14, 1918.

This stamp, with Positions 47-48 and 58, at one time comprised a block of four owned by Eugene Klein. After Klein's death in 1944, his daughter, Dolores Klein Hertz, was instructed to claim a sealed container held by a Philadelphia bank in accordance with his Will. Resting on top of the various stamp collections in this container was the block of inverts.

The Klein-Hertz block was sold by Mrs. Hertz to Robert A. Siegel, who in turn placed it with Raymond H. Weill Co. The block was later sold by the Weills to a collector, Mr. Phillips, whose philatelic estate they acquired in 1968 for just over $4 million. The Weills received Philatelic Foundation certificate number 10,000 prior to splitting the block into singles at their client's request. This example comes from the position next to the Zoellner copy (Position 58), which realized $525,000 hammer in our 2005 Rarities sale, still a record price for the Inverted "Jenny".

Ex Colonel Edward H. R. Green, Eugene Klein, Dolores Klein Hertz, B. D. Phillips and William C. Mack. With 1988 P.F. certificate.

400,000
850,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2007-06-16
2007 Rarities of the World
og
Sale Number 937, Lot Number 285, Air Post24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 13, slightly disturbed original gum, brilliant colors, small thin spots

FINE APPEARANCE. LONG THOUGHT LOST TO PHILATELY, THIS INVERTED "JENNY" IS OFFERED AT AUCTION FOR THE FIRST TIME SINCE EUGENE KLEIN BROKE APART THE SHEET SHORTLY AFTER ITS DISCOVERY. AN ICONIC STAMP AND FANTASTIC PIECE OF AMERICAN PHILATELIC HISTORY.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner.

Ex Colonel Green. With 2007 P.F. certificate.

275,000
220,000
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United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2007-05-22
The Saddleback Collection of U.S. Errors and Plate Blocks
og
Sale Number 935, Lot Number 177, Air Post24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 38, bright and fresh, well-centered, barest trace of hinging

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. A REMARKABLY FRESH AND BEAUTIFULLY CENTERED EXAMPLE OF THE FAMOUS 1918 24-CENT INVERTED "JENNY". THIS STAMP IS ONE OF THE BETTER-CENTERED POSITIONS FROM THE DISCOVERY SHEET.

According to Jenny by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 Inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased for $24 by William T. Robey at the New York Avenue Branch Post Office window in Washington D.C., on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was first placed on sale at the main post office. On May 20, Robey sold his sheet for $15,000 to Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Klein had already arranged to sell the sheet to Col. Edward H. R. Green for $20,000. Colonel Green instructed Klein to divide the Inverted "Jenny" sheet into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

It is well-known among stamp specialists and professionals that examples of the Inverted "Jenny" come in different grades of freshness and condition. Many of the original 100 stamps were mistreated by collectors during the years, despite the stamps' rarity and value. Colonel Green himself allowed moisture to affect some of the stamps he retained. Other examples have become slightly toned from improper storage and climatic conditions. Hinge removal has caused thins and creases in numerous stamps, and a few have been "lost" to philately -- or nearly so, as in the case of the copy swept up in a vacuum cleaner. This example is remarkable for its pristine state of preservation and for its centering, equalled by only a few stamps in the original sheet (almost all of the others have disturbed gum or faults).

Ex Stephen Brown and Oscar Lichtenstein. With 1978 P.F. certificate.

275,000
350,000
Back to Top
United States
U.S. Stamps
Back-of-Book
Air Post
2006-05-13
2006 Rarities of the World
ng
Sale Number 913, Lot Number 889, Air Post, including Inverted Jenny24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a)24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a). Position 40, unused (no gum), bright colors, natural s.e. at right, 16mm sealed tear and scuff at top, thin spot

FINE APPEARING EXAMPLE OF THE RARE 24-CENT INVERTED JENNY. AN EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE AN EXAMPLE OF AMERICA'S MOST FAMOUS STAMP.

According to Jenny! by George Amick (Amos Press, 1986), the original sheet of 100 inverted "Jenny" stamps was purchased by William T. Robey on May 14, 1918, one day after the stamp was placed on sale. Robey bought the sheet at the New York Avenue Post Office window in Washington, D.C. Soon after, the sheet was sold to Col. Edward H. R. Green through Eugene Klein, a Philadelphia stamp dealer. Green paid $20,000 for the sheet, then instructed Klein to divide it into singles and blocks, and to sell all but a few key position blocks.

The stamp offered here was offered in one of the auctions of the Green Collection (Sale XV on March 27, 1944) where it was described as not having any gum. Presumably, mishandling by Colonel Green was the reason for this. It was next offered as part of the Max Simon Collection in 1966.

Signed Sanabria. Two P.F. certificates do not accompany

225,000
50,000
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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=U.S. Stamps, All Sale Dates thru 2011/10/11, Catalogue = c3a

61 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 7


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