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21,748 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 290

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, All Sale Dates thru 2017/03/30
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Date
Lot#/
Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
Realized
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 93, Mount Lebanon, LouisianaMount Lebanon La., 5c Red Brown (60X1), Mount Lebanon La., 5c Red Brown (60X1)Mount Lebanon La., 5c Red Brown (60X1). Fine impression that shows all of the lettering and reveals the wood grain of the printing block, neatly cancelled with small pen stroke, affixed upside down on bright white cover to "Mr. D. Ripley, care Adol. Hamilton Esq., New Orleans, La." with printed corner card for "C. G. Thurmond, Dealer in Staples & Fancy Dry Goods, Hardware, Groceries, &c., &c., Mt. Lebanon, La.", stamp has huge margins cleanly cut at top and bottom and roughly separated at sides (causing a tiny tear), cover opened roughly at left, which effectively ties the stamp, a piece of backing paper affixed behind left edge of cover purely for cosmetic purposes

VERY FINE. THE FAMOUS AND UNIQUE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL OF MOUNT LEBANON, LOUISIANA. THIS REMARKABLE STAMP IS A MIRROR IMAGE OF THE INTENDED DESIGN, WHICH WAS CREATED BY HAMMERING PRINTER'S TYPE INTO A WOOD BLOCK. THE MOUNT LEBANON HAS BEEN DISPLAYED AMONG THE "ARISTOCTRATS OF PHILATELY" AT INTERPHIL '76, AMERIPEX '86 AND ANPHILEX '96, AND IT IS WIDELY REGARDED AS THE MOST VALUABLE STAMP IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

Mount Lebanon was settled in 1847 by immigrants from South Carolina. The village is located in Bienville Parish, which was established in 1848 and named for Jean Baptiste Sieur de Bienville, colonizer of Louisiana and founder of the city of New Orleans. It lies in northern Louisiana, approximately 400 miles distance from New Orleans. Mount Lebanon was the site of the first Baptist church in North Louisiana, and the Baptist Convention founded Mount Lebanon University in 1855. During the Civil War, the school was closed and turned into a hospital -- it moved to Pineville after the war and was re-named Louisiana College. [Reference: www:louisianahistory.ourfamily.com].

According to an account by L. B. Dabney, published in the Southern Philatelist (May 1929) and reprinted in the Crown book (p. 238), the Mount Lebanon postmaster during the war (1859-1865) was W. F. Wells, who was publisher of the Louisiana Baptist newspaper. According to citizens of Mount Lebanon who were interviewed by Dabney for his 1929 article, the provisional stamps were printed by Wells and used briefly in June 1861. Mount Lebanon had a wartime population of less than 1,000, and it is unlikely that the stamp saw widespread use.

Apart from its extreme rarity, the Mount Lebanon provisional stamp is believed to be the sole example of a mirror-image stamp in all of philately. The stamp was printed from a piece of wood with a relatively smooth surface. Lines were incised into the wood and strips were removed to create the borders surrounding each stamp. Horizontal and vertical ruled lines were added within the borders of each subject, and a circle was cut into the center. At this point the "engraver" took printer's type and hammered the letters spelling "Mt. Lebanon La." around the circle, and the numeral "5" was impressed into the center. The enlarged photo shown here in upright position clearly shows the effect of this process -- the printed stamp is a mirror image of the right-reading wood engraving. As anyone familiar with printing knows, the plate used to print an image must mirror the intended design. This principle of typography was missed or ignored by the creator of the Mount Lebanon provisional.

The single known example shows parts of three adjoining subjects at left, at the extreme bottom-left corner, and at bottom (see detail). There is additional printing to the right of the primary impression, which we think is a second impression. Judging from the size, shape and line breaks of this second impression, this might be the bottom of the woodblock, turned 90 degrees. Such work-and-turn printing is found on other provisionals (Memphis 5c, for example). All of this is purely hypothetical, and we encourage others to develop a better explanation.

The Mount Lebanon cover was part of the Ferrary collection sold at auction in Paris in 1925-1927. It next appeared in the Alfred H. Caspary sale held by H. R. Harmer in 1956, where A. Earl Weatherly acquired it for his collection. At the invitation of Weatherly in 1963, Charles and Lucy Kilbourne acquired a number of important provisional rarities by private sale. Thus, the famous Mount Lebanon cover appears at auction for the first time in 43 years. It has been shown in the Aristocrats of Philately display, alongside major philatelic rarities of the world, at Interphil 1976, Ameripex 1986 and Anphilex 1996.

Ex Ferrary, Caspary and Weatherly. Acquired by the Kilbournes from Weatherly in 1963.

100,000
350,000
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 29, Galveston Tex. To Helena Tex.Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Buff (29X7 var), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Buff (29X7 var)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Buff (29X7 var). Large even margins all around, tied by “PAID” straightline cancel, second strike to left, on brown cover to Susan F. Moody, Victoria Tex.--the wife of Victoria Postmaster James A. Moody--with original letter enclosure datelined “Goliad, August” (circa 1864), light pre-manufacturing fold in cover at left, small piece out of backflap from opening, these negligible flaws mentioned only to emphasize the exceptionally fine condition of this rare provisional cover

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FOUR 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS. THE STAMP IS PRINTED ON BUFF PAPER, NOT THE LISTED GRAY PAPER.

Of the eight normal Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library, which leaves four covers available to collectors. Only three of the four covers have stamps tied by the town datestamp or “Paid” straightline. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are two other covers with the Type II “GOILAD” spelling error.

The stamp on this cover is certified as the normal 29X7 on Gray paper, and it has always been described in accordance with the Scott listing. However, as the comparison photograph shows (below), this stamp and the Gray 29X7 stamp (lot 28) are on two different colored papers. This stamp is more accurately described as Buff. It is known that the Goliad Messenger newspaper office used whatever paper they could find, including salvaged paper from other print runs. Therefore, it is quite conceivable that papers of different colors were used for the Goliad printings.

This cover was acquired in 1988 by Charles W. Deaton from descendants of the Moody family. It is the last Goliad provisional to come to light..

Illustrated in Deaton’s The Great Texas Stamp Collection (plate 15). Ex “Camina” (Castillejo). With 1994 P.F. certificate as 10c Black on Gray 29X7.

40,000
110,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 156, Victoria, TexasVictoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2), Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2)Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2). Two huge margins, touched at right and bottom, tied by "Victoria Tex. Mar. 30" (1863) circular datestamp on blue folded letter to J. San Roman, Brownsville, Tex., contents regarding goods from Matamoros, Mexico, very faint toning

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE VICTORIA 10-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY FOUR EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN. THIS AND THE OTHER 10-CENT ARE THE ONLY RECORDED COVERS FOR ANY OF THE VICTORIA PROVISIONALS.

Our records contain four examples of the Victoria 10c Type I (large thin numerals): 1) Mar. 30, 1863 cover to J. San Roman, offered here, ex Brooks, Weatherly; 2) Jun. 23 (1863) cover to C. Hellenkamp, ex Caspary and Muzzy; 3) Unused stamp with small repair, ex Hessel; and 4) a severely damaged stamp with one third of lower right missing when discovered by A. Steves (P.F. photo files). The two covers bearing the 10c Type I are the only covers recorded for any of the Victoria provisionals. The ex-Caspary cover was acquired by John R. Boker Jr. in the 1967 Muzzy sale and has not since been offered publicly. This cover was acquired by Harold C. Brooks privately and sold to A. Earl Weatherly in another private transaction. The Kilbournes acquired the cover directly from Weatherly; therefore, it has never appeared at public auction. Considering that the last public transaction involving one of the two known Victoria provisional covers took place in 1967, the "current" Scott value of $17,500 should be weighed against more relevant market factors.

Illustrated in Ashbrook article on the Brooks collection (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945). Ex Brooks and Weatherly (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1963)

17,500
105,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1123, Victoria, TexasVictoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2), Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2)Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2). Two huge margins, touched at right and bottom, tied by "Victoria Tex. Mar. 30" (1863) circular datestamp on blue folded letter to J. San Roman, Brownsville, Tex., contents regarding goods from Matamoros, Mexico, very faint toning around edges of stamp

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE VICTORIA 10-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY FIVE EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN. THE TWO 10-CENT COVERS ARE THE ONLY RECORDED COVERS FOR ANY OF THE VICTORIA PROVISIONALS.

James A. Moody was appointed Victoria's U.S. postmaster on May 22, 1846. He was appointed C.S.A. postmaster on July 12, 1861, and served until he was replaced by a U.S. postmaster in April 1865 (this information from Vince King).

Moody issued 5c and 10c provisional stamps bearing his name. All of the stamps were printed from a typeset form on green paper. The 5c and 10c settings with large numerals are quite similar in composition. A second 10c setting with a small italic numeral "10" was also used. The only Victoria provisional covers known are both franked with a single 10c with large numeral, dated March 30 and June 23, 1863 (the cover offered here is the earlier of the two).

Our records contain five examples of the Victoria 10c Type I (large thin numerals): 1) Mar. 30, 1863 cover to J. San Roman, ex Brooks, Weatherly, Kilbourne and Gross, the cover offered here; 2) Jun. 23 (1863) cover to C. Hellenkamp, ex Caspary, Muzzy and Boker; 3) Unused stamp with small repair, ex Hessel; 4) A severely damaged stamp with one third of lower right missing when discovered by Albert Steves; and 5) Unused stamp with thin and horizontal crease ending in a small tear, from a recent find, ex Felton (Siegel Sale 1016, lot 646).

The two covers bearing the 10c Type I are the only covers recorded for any of the Victoria provisionals. The ex-Caspary cover was acquired by John R. Boker Jr. in the 1967 Muzzy sale and has not since been offered publicly. The cover offered here was acquired by Harold C. Brooks and sold to A. Earl Weatherly in another private transaction. Charles and Lucy Kilbourne acquired the cover directly from Weatherly in 1963. It was next sold in our 1999 Kilbourne sale and purchased by Charles and Tracy Shreve for William H. Gross for $105,000 (Siegel Sale 815, lot 156). D.K. acquired the cover in the 2009 Spink-Shreves sale of the Gross Confederate States collection for $95,000 hammer.

Illustrated in Ashbrook article on the Brooks collection (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945). Source notation "Nassau 1940" on back (believed to be Weatherly's). Ex Brooks, Weatherly, Kilbourne and Gross. With 2010 P.F. certificate

125,000
100,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 35, Jackson Miss. To Livingston Ala.Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1), Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1)Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1). Full to huge margins showing part of adjoining stamp above, bottom right margin clears frameline, beautiful rich color, neatly tied by “Livingston Ala. Nov. 15” (1861) circular datestamp on light yellow cover to Mrs. M. A. Sturdivant, Hollow Square Ala., sender’s “Chg box 102” notation

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE FINEST SINGLE FRANKING AMONG THE SEVEN RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE LIVINGSTON PROVISIONAL -- A STRIKING PICTORIAL STAMP THAT DEPICTS THE SOUTHERN SHIELD AND ALLEGORICAL FIGURES. ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING OF ALL CONFEDERATE COVERS.

There are six single-franked covers, one of which is disfigured. The other four are attractive, but none equals this magnificent cover’s quality. Stanley B. Ashbrook described this item as “really a superb cover and the finest Livingston that I have ever seen.” (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945)

This cover was purchased privately before World War II by Harold C. Brooks, and when the Brooks collection was dispersed, this Livingston (one of two owned by Brooks) was sold privately to A. Earl Weatherly. In 1963 Charles and Lucy Kilbourne purchased the cover directly from Weatherly. In the 1999 Kilbourne sale it was acquired by William H. Gross, and in the Shreves-Spink 2010 Gross sale it was bought by Mr. Sharrer’s agent.

Signed Ashbrook. Ex Brooks, Weatherly, Kilbourne and Gross

60,000
100,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1087, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3), New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3)New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with United States 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED, AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read; in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have a Southern Postmaster's Provisional stamps (both New Orleans). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-14. Illustrated in National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial book and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas, Ishikawa and Walske. With 2010 P.F. certificate

E. 75,000-100,000
90,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 104, Nashville, Tenn.Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6), Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6)Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6). Two huge margins, framelines touched at top and right, deep shade, scissors-cut at top left, tied by blue "Adams Express Co. Nashville Aug. 1" oval datestamp with matching "10" handstamp indicating Confederate postage rate on United States 3c Red Star Die entire to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth, Petersburg Va., "Adams Ex. Co. * Louisville, Ky. * Jul. 30, 1861" circular datestamp cancels 3c embossed stamp, small red ms. "2" express charge (two bits, or 25c), receipt docketing "Prof. Agnew & Sundry others", small part of backflap removed, light soiling and edge wear

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY COVERS WITH THE NASHVILLE 10-CENT PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE MIXED FRANKINGS WITH UNITED STATES POSTAGE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER THAT COMBINES THE RAREST ELEMENTS OF PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

As explained in the previous description, Adams Express Company was required to ensure the prepayment of government postage (Federal and Confederate), although the letter was carried outside the regular mails. Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with thru-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive).

Of the Nashville provisional/express covers, five are known with the 5c and three with the 10c; only two of the 10c covers are mixed frankings (the third is used alone). These two Nashville 10c mixed-franking covers carried by Adams, both North-to-South usages, are the only 10c adhesive Confederate provisionals known in combination with United States postage. As such, they are quite significant artifacts of this remarkable period of postal history.

Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 23). Ex Antrim (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1958). Accompanied by signed Ashbrook photo.

E. 50,000-75,000
90,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2007-09-27
The Buck Boshwit Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 940, Lot Number 357, PostmasterNashville Tenn., 5c Carmine, 10c Green (61X2, 61X6), Nashville Tenn., 5c Carmine, 10c Green (61X2, 61X6)Nashville Tenn., 5c Carmine, 10c Green (61X2, 61X6). 5c deep rich color, large margins all around, 10c intense shade, large margins to just barely in along upper right frameline, both stamps tied by bold blue "Nashville Ten. Aug. 21, 1861" circular datestamp on reduced and repaired legal-size cover to Athens Tenn., from the Cleage correspondence, three-times 5c rate (1 to 1-1/2 ounces), part of embossed seal at top center

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED COVER WITH BOTH DENOMINATIONS OF THE NASHVILLE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ISSUE. ONLY TWO CONFEDERATE STATES COVERS ARE KNOWN WITH DIFFERENT PROVISIONAL ADHESIVES USED TOGETHER, THIS BEING THE ONLY COMBINATION WITH A 10-CENT. A SPECTACULAR COVER AND OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

Combination frankings involving two different stamps are extremely scarce in Confederate philately. Even among the General Issues, covers showing 2c, 5c and 10c stamps used in any kind of combination are elusive, and those involving 10c stamps are exceedingly rare. We know of only two Confederate provisional combination covers: the Nashville Tenn. 5c and 10c combination offered here, ex Caspary, and the New Orleans 2c and 5c combination, ex Dr. Hubert C. Skinner (Siegel Sale 832, lot 3060). This Nashville cover is a three-times 5c rate and has been skillfully reduced and restored. The New Orleans cover was prepaid at the 10c rate, with a 1c overpayment.

Ex Caspary, Lightner and Freeland.

E. 75,000-100,000
85,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 32, Southern Letter Unpaid MailNew Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3), New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3)New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID"%$ two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED (OFFERED IN THIS SALE), AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read; in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have Confederate State Postmaster Provisional stamps (both New Orleans and both offered in this sale). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-14. Illustrated in the National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial book and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas and Ishikawa.

E. 100,000-150,000
85,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2016-03-16
The Steven Walske Collection of US-France Transatlantic Mail
c
Sale Number 1119, Lot Number 564, Civil War Period MailSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Perfect strike of blue two-line handstamp at bottom, another strike ties 12c Black, Plate 3, and 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (36B, 26) 12c stamp with double frameline at left, on border embossed 1861 cover to Paris, France, addressed to "Monsieur Hippolyte Messant, place Dauphine No. 14" (presumably Hippolyte Villemessant of Figaro fame), "New Orleans La. 10 Jun." (1861) circular datestamp and blue crayon "10" for prepaid Confederate postage, blue "Louisville Ky. Jun. 27" double-circle datestamp ties 3c stamp, "New York 9 Jun. 29" debit datestamp also ties 3c stamp, manuscript "15" (cents) applied in U.S. and "8" decimes due handstamp applied in France, which ties the 12c stamp, red Calais Jul. 13 arrival datestamp ties both stamps, Paris receiving backstamps (Jul. 13), stamps are scissors-separated but perfs are complete all around on both

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS ONE OF TWO RECORDED "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVERS BEARING THE 12-CENT 1860 ISSUE AND ONE OF ONLY FIVE TO A FOREIGN DESTINATION. ITS HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE, EXTREME RARITY AND IMPECCABLE QUALITY COMBINE TO MAKE IT ONE OF THE QUINTESSENTIAL COVERS OF AMERICAN POSTAL HISTORY.

The U.S. May 27, 1861, suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north.

With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp.

Because the U.S.-France treaty had a provision for unpaid mail, this cover was allowed to go through the U.S. mails with no postage due until arrival in France. Two covers from this correspondence are known, both identically addressed on the same embossed envelopes. They were carried together in the mail postmarked at New Orleans on June 10. The other cover, ex Antrim and Wishnietsky, lacks the Louisville June 27 datestamp and has a single strike of the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking on the stamps. They were presumably released on the same day, which means that the Louisville office did not mark all letters in a consistent manner.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication). The five recorded foreign-bound covers are as follows: 1) Louisville June 27, from St. Francisville La. to Prussia; 2) Louisville June 27, from Bayou Chene La. to France, ex Wunsch and Myers (Siegel Sale 882, lot 2001); 3) Louisville June 27, from New Orleans to France (the cover offered here, pictured on the front cover of the Special Routes book; 4) no Louisville datestamp, franked with Scott Nos. 36B and 26, from New Orleans to France, ex Antrim and Wishnietsky, Siegel sale 1064, lot 23; and 5) Louisville Jul. 11, from Petersburg Va. to England, 24c 1860, ex Matthies and Dr. Graves

Special Routes Census No. SLU-7. Ex Shenfield, Sweet, Judd and Kilbourne. Illustrated on p. 6 of Shenfield's Special Postal Routes and in Ashbrook's Special Service #28, p. 203. Pictured on the front cover and on p. 15 of the Special Routes book by Steven Walske and Scott Trepel

E. 80,000-100,000
80,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1021, Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6), Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6)Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6). Woodcut press-printed provisional at upper right corner of envelope, bold "Charleston S.C. Jul. 11, 186-" circular datestamp (1862 with blank fourth digit), addressed to Mr. A. O. Norris at Anderson C.H. S.C., receipt docketing "Written to & money sent the 14 July 1862" and "from J. H. Johnson", additional docketing in the same hand on back "Check 500/Cash 100/600 14 July 1862"

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE UNIQUE CHARLESTON 10-CENT PRESS-PRINTED PALMETTO TREE PROVISIONAL ENVELOPE, USED DURING A SHORTAGE OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUES.

After graduation from Princeton University, Alfred Huger returned to Charleston to run his plantation. Huger received his postmaster appointment from President Andrew Jackson on December 19, 1834, and he served until Federal occupation in February 1865. Huger was postmaster in July 1835 when sacks of mail containing abolitionist literature from the North were burned by a pro-slavery mob. After the war Huger declined President Andrew Johnson's offer of reappointment as a U.S. postmaster.

Huger issued press-printed typographic provisional envelopes in the summer of 1861, probably close to the earliest known date of August 16 (Calhoun census). The lithographed adhesive provisional stamp followed in early September 1861. Lithography was used by only three postmasters to print provisional stamps (Charleston, Livingston and Mobile). The first supply of Confederate General Issue stamps was placed on sale on December 7, 1861, and the provisionals were withdrawn from sale. However, provisionals purchased by the public prior to withdrawal continued to be used concurrently with the General Issues. In June and July 1862 the Charleston post office ran short of General Issue stamps, and provisionals were re-released. The latest recorded use of a Charleston provisional is dated August 5, 1862, with a mixed franking of the 5c De La Rue Print (Scott 6) and 5c adhesive (Richard L. Calhoun, "Inventory of Charleston, South Carolina, Postmaster Provisionals," Confederate Philatelist, Jan.-Feb. 1989).

It is reported that the stamps and envelopes were printed by the large Charleston-based printing firm of Evans and Cogswell. According to http://www.csa-scla.org : "...Evans & Cogswell Printing Company was retained as printers to the Secession Convention, and daily printed the minutes of the Convention in S.C., and printed the documents that communicated the secession to the other Southern States. The Ordinance of Secession, one of the most fateful and fatal documents in America's history, was lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. During the War Between the States, Evans and Cogswell printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier's Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy."

This Palmetto Tree design is unique among Southern Postmasters' Provisionals. On this entire -- the sole surviving example -- the woodcut is printed in dark blue, identical in shade and impression to the 5c provisional envelope stamp issued in August 1861. The circular datestamp is struck at the center of the upper half of the entire. Charleston did not have a separate cancelling device and used the datestamp to cancel adhesive stamps; therefore, the position of the complete datestamp on this entire confirms the presence of the printed provisional at upper right and precludes the removal of an adhesive stamp from the envelope.

The first Charleston provisionals were the press-printed 5c envelopes issued in August 1861 and used consistently until the estimated 5,000 prepared were sold out in November 1861 (dates range from August 16 to November 12, 1861). Approximately 25,000 5c adhesive stamps were produced and placed on sale as early as September 1861 (earliest recorded date is September 4). Both provisionals were used concurrently with the handstamped "Paid" markings, but the surcharge on the price of provisionals made the stamps and envelopes less popular with the public. When the General Issues were finally received and put on sale on December 7, 1861, the large number of 5c provisionals still on hand was withdrawn, although they remained valid for prepayment.

In June 1862 the supply of 5c General Issues available at the Charleston post office was running low, and Postmaster Huger authorized the renewed sale of provisionals. More than a dozen examples of the 5c provisional stamp are known used in the months of June, July and August 1862. The handstamped "Paid" marking was also used again briefly in June 1862 after having been previously retired in December 1861. The rate increase from 5c to 10c for any distance became effective July 1, 1862, during this shortage of General Issues. Charleston covers are recorded in early July 1862 with the 5c Blue Lithograph and 10c Rose Lithograph stamps, but these are scarce, indicating that only a small supply of the newer General Issues was available. Further evidence of the shortage is an August 5, 1862, cover with a combination of the 5c De La Rue stamp and 5c provisional for the 10c rate. A supply of press-printed 10c envelopes from an earlier printing was probably released in anticipation of the July 1862 rate change and in response to the shortage of General Issues. The provisional envelope's great rarity is probably due to the arrival of 10c Rose stamps in July 1862, which are found on covers dated July 3, 4, 5 and continuing on with frequency until replaced by the De La Rue and Richmond 5c printings.

This unique example of the 10c Palmetto Tree entire was discovered by the late Dr. Don Preston Peters of Lynchburg, Virginia, in an original correspondence to A. O. Norris at Anderson Court House, South Carolina. Norris was a newspaper publisher and, after the war, a probate judge. The receipt docketing indicates that the sender was J. H. Johnson. There was an ordnance sergeant with the 10th South Carolina Infantry Regiment named J. H. Johnson, who might be the same person.

We regard this entire as one of the most important and distinctive of all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals, by virtue of its extreme rarity, the distinctive Palmetto Tree design, and as one of the few 10c provisionals issued east of the Mississippi.

Ex Dr. Peters, Heathcote, Dr. Graves and Birkinbine. With Ashbrook letter

77,500
70,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1997-10-28
Confederate States
c
Sale Number 795, Lot Number 330, Postmasters ProvisionalsCharleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6), Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6)Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6). Woodcut provisional press-printed at upper right corner of entire, bold "Charleston S.C. Jul. 11, 186-" circular datestamp (1862 with blank fourth digit), addressed to Mr. A. O. Norris at Anderson C.H. S.C., July 14, 1861 receipt docketing "from J. H. Johnson"

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE CHARLESTON 10-CENT PRESS-PRINTED PALMETTO TREE ENTIRE, USED IN JULY 1862 DURING A SHORTAGE OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUES.

This Palmetto Tree design is unique among Confederate postmasters' provisionals, although the symbol was also used on the unissued 10c adhesive stamp prepared for the Charleston postmaster, Alfred Huger. On this entire - the sole surviving example - the woodcut is printed in a dark blue identical in shade and consistency to the 5c woodcut provisional issued in 1861. The circular datestamp is struck at the center of the upper half of the entire, a position consistent with virtually all recorded genuine examples of the earlier 5c entire. Charleston did not have a separate cancelling device and used the datestamp to cancel adhesive stamps; therefore, the position of the datestamp on this entire confirms the presence of the printed provisional at upper right and precludes any possibility that an adhesive was removed.

The first provisionals used in Charleston were the press-printed 5c envelopes issued in August 1861 (eku Aug. 16) and used consistently until the estimated 5,000 prepared were sold out in November 1861 (lku Nov. 12). Approximately 25,000 5c adhesive stamps were produced and placed on sale as early as September 1861 (eku Sep. 4). Both provisionals were used concurrently with the handstamped "Paid" markings, but the surcharge on the price of provisionals made these less popular with the public. When Confederate General Issues were finally received and put on sale at the Charleston post office on December 7, 1861, the large number of 5c provisionals still on hand was withdrawn, although letters franked with the provisionals were still accepted as prepaid.

In June 1862 the supply of 5c General Issues available at the Charleston post office was evidently diminished, and Postmaster Huger authorized the renewed sale of provisional adhesive stamps. More than a dozen examples of the 5c provisional stamp are known used in the months of June, July and August 1862. The handstamped "Paid" marking was also used again briefly in June 1862 after having been previously retired in December 1861.

The rate increase from 5c to 10c for any distance became effective July 1, 1862, during the shortage of General Issues. Charleston covers are recorded in early July 1862 with the 5c Blue Lithograph (Scott 4) or 10c Rose Lithograph stamps, but these are scarce, indicating that only a small supply of the newer General Issues was available. Further evidence of the shortage is an August 5th cover with a combination of the 5c De La Rue stamp and 5c provisional for the 10c rate.

The press-printed entire must be viewed in the context of the above-outlined events and circumstances. It was almost certainly issued in anticipation of the July 1862 rate change and in response to the shortage of General Issues. The 10c press-printed entire's great rarity is probably due to the arrival of 10c Rose Lithograph stamps in July 1862, which are found on covers dated July 3, 4, 5 and continuing on with frequency until replaced by the De La Rue and Richmond 5c printings. The total absence of unused 10c entires from the original printing is consistent with other Charleston provisionals, which were probably destroyed when the post office was moved in August 1863, following the shelling of Charleston by Union forces on Morris Island.

This unique example of the 10c Palmetto Tree entire was discovered by the late Dr. Don Preston Peters of Lynchburg, Virginia, in an original correspondence to A. O. Norris at Anderson Court House, South Carolina. Two pre-war covers from Pendleton and Greenville C.H., South Carolina, together with Dr. Peters' original notes, are included in this lot. The cover was offered in the 1949 auction of the Peters collection, at which time it was not listed in the Scott Catalogue. A letter from Stanley B. Ashbrook, dated November 19, 1949, is also included and affirms Ashbrook's opinion that the unique entire is genuine.

We regard this entire as one of the most important and distinctive of all Confederate postmasters' provisionals, by virtue of its extreme rarity, its Palmetto Tree design, and as one of the few 10c provisionals issued east of the Mississippi after the July 1862 rate change. There are sixteen unique Confederate postmasters' provisional adhesives (A) or press-printed entires (E); the others are from Austin Miss. (E), Beaumont Tex. (A - large 10c type), Bridgeville Ala. (A - pair), Fincastle Va. (E), Franklin N.C. (E), Hallettsville Tex. (A), Hillsboro N.C. (A), Jetersville Va. (A - pair), Kingston Tenn. (E), Knoxville Tenn. (A - 10c), Mt. Lebanon La. (A), New Smyrna Fla. (A), Port Lavaca Tex. (A), Rutherfordton N.C. (A) and Salisbury N.C. (E - damaged).

Ex Dr. Peters. Information on Charleston post office and provisional issues derived mostly from research published by Richard Calhoun and unpublished Levi records. Listed but unpriced in Scott and Dietz

E. 60,000-80,000
70,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1996-07-10
Civil War Postal History & Autographs
 
Sale Number 779, Lot Number 230, Confederate NotablesThe Album of J.E.B. Stuart, The Album of J.E.B. StuartThe Album of J.E.B. Stuart. 8vo (6-1/2 x 7-1/2 in.). Published by J.C. Riker, printed title page "ALBUM" with engraving by A.L. Dick and nine illustrations, hand-colored or black & white (including two with embellishments in pen and ink by Stuart himself), original brownish black boards, leather spine with design of woman, edges gilt; covers with edge wear and some loss to spine at top, pages showing scorch marks at bottom to varying degrees (see preface)

THE GENERAL'S PRIVATE ALBUM, CONTAINING 34 ORIGINAL POEMS WRITTEN IN HIS YOUTH.

All in Stuart's hand (32 signed "J.E.B.", one in full, one unsigned), with a wonderful preface, "This Album" datelined "Camp Stuart Texas Feby. 17th 1855" and which reads (in full): "This album is the sacred repository of a few contributions original and selected by some of my college companions while a student at Emory & Henry College Virginia, as pledges of their esteem when the owner left its halls to enter the Military Academy at West Point N.Y. in 1850. Since that time it has not been used exclusively as an album but as sketch book, and a place for jotting down some of the offspring of his own pen suggested by different circumstances and occasions, and also the recepticle of a few selections, suiting his fancy. As such it is a book private in its character and personal in its object. As it has followed me wherever I have gone since 1850, my companion in Scouts on the Northwestern frontier of Texas, in one of which it narrowly escaped being burnt, as the valise in which I kept it and all my clothes were consumed by the Prairie's catching on fire. I have deemed it proper to write this preface in order that should the book ever fall in others' hands, its ownership might be known and its character not misunderstood. J.E.B. Stuart Lieut. R.M.R." Stuart's poems are typical of a college-educated young man - effusive, melancholy, and filled with the usual archaic diction, but his occasional use of military imagery and the numerous references to the women in his life make these something more than of just passing interest to today's readers. Titles include "A Prayer," "To -" (An acrostic which spells out the name of Mary Custis Lee), "The Mesmeriser" ("Respectfully dedicated to Miss Minnie B. of West Point"), "Lines in Answer to a Valentine supposed to be written by Miss Agnes L.", "The Advent of Furlough," "Lines Written on Leaving the States for Texas," "To Miss Mary Joyner Kerr of N. Carolina," "The Dream of Youth (To his Sister Victoria)," "To Miss Emily of West Point," "Lines sent to a Lady with a box of prunes," "Lines Respectfully dedicated to Miss XXXX" - A Tale of Romance"), "To Mary," "Lines For a Lady's Album in St. Louis," "To Bettie" [see next lot], "Lines Respectfully inscribed to the Misses Crockett of Bowling Green Virginia," "To the One I Love," etc. There is also an 8-page poem, "West Point," dedicated to Mary Custis Lee, some prose and an interesting note, written in minute script over a brownish stain: "My Blood Mar. 8, 1855." In addition there are more than twenty pages of entries by friends and relatives, including a dedication in verse by Jno. S. Cocke ("This volume is a consecrated thing"), "To Jim on leaving College," "To my friend J.E.B. Stuart," "To Beaut," etc. Approximately 87 pages, each poem is dated, often with the place of composition noted: West Point, Steamer Trabue on Mississippi, Camp Seclusion, Camp Stuart, Camp on Jolly River Texas, etc. Virtually unknown to historians and the collecting community, this unique book is offered for the first time at public auction

E. 40,000-60,000
70,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-04-27
U.S. & C.S.A. Postal History
c
Sale Number 810, Lot Number 1897, Confederate States Postmasters Provisionals (Dalton to Macon)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7). Mostly ample to clear margins, ornaments just touched at top and upper right, strong impression on distinctive blue-gray paper, tied by "Paid" straightline on lady's cover -- a small high-quality envelope made of wavy-line watermarked paper -- to Stonewall Tex., with original letter enclosed, datelined "Goliad, Oct. 21st, 1863", invisibly sealed opening tear along top edge at upper left corner

EXTREMELY FINE. THE EARLIEST DATED EXAMPLE OF A GOLIAD PROVISIONAL AND ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FOUR 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS.

Of the eight Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library, which leaves four covers available to collectors. Only three of the four covers have stamps tied by the town datestamp or "Paid" straightline. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are two other covers with the Type II "GOILAD" spelling error.

The earliest recorded date for any Goliad provisional is October 21, 1863, but it is our theory that the Type I provisionals were issued in 1861, followed in 1863 by a new provisional stamp printing from the Type II settings, which contain the postmaster's name and title. Therefore, this cover is more accurately described as the earliest known date for any Type II provisional.

Ex Hessel and Hill. With 1998 P.F. certificate ("genuine")

7,500
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1072, Nashville, TennesseeNashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6), Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6)Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6). Two huge margins, framelines touched at top and right, deep shade, scissors-cut at top left, tied by blue "Adams Express Co. Nashville Aug. 1" oval datestamp on United States 3c Red on White Star Die entire (U26) to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth in Petersburg Va., "Adams Ex. Co. * Louisville, Ky. * Jul. 30, 1861" circular datestamp cancels 3c embossed stamp, small red manuscript "2" express charge (two bits, or 25c), blue "10" handstamp applied at Petersburg to indicate postage due (presumably the letter was over the half-ounce weight limit), receipt docketing "Prof. Agnew & Sundry others", small part of backflap removed, light soiling and edgewear (slight improvement at top right corner)

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY COVERS WITH THE NASHVILLE 10-CENT PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE MIXED FRANKINGS WITH UNITED STATES POSTAGE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER THAT COMBINES THE RAREST ELEMENTS OF PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

Adams Express Company was required to ensure the prepayment of government postage (Federal and Confederate), although the letter was carried outside the regular mails. Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with across-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive).

Only three across-the-lines express covers are recorded with the Nashville 10c adhesive provisional (Special Routes Census Nos. S-AD-44, 45 and 46), all dated at Nashville on August 1. Only two of the 10c covers are mixed frankings (the third is used alone). These two Nashville 10c mixed-franking covers carried by Adams, both North-to-South usages, are the only 10c adhesive Confederate provisionals known in combination with United States postage. As such, they are quite significant artifacts from this remarkable period of postal history.

Our records contain six genuine covers with the Nashville 10c Green provisional: 1) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, to Hardy & Bros., Norfolk Va.; 2) Tied by Sep. 15, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to Shelbyville Tenn., ex Caspary; 3) 5c & 10c used together, tied by Aug. 21, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to D. Cleage, Athens Tenn., ex Caspary, Lightner, Graves and Boshwit; 4) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die entire to Rev. Leavenworth, Petersburg Va., ex Kilbourne and Walske, the cover offered here; 5) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die with additional 3c 1857, to Albert F. Ryan, Norfolk Va., ex Gallagher; and 6) Tied by "10" rate handstamp, Sep. 18, 1861, Nashville datestamp, on building corner card cover to Thos. H. Caldwell, Shelbyville Tenn., ex Needham, Kimmel, Haas and Rudy.

The addressee, Reverend Abner Johnson Leavenworth, was at this time the principal and proprietor of the Leavenworth Academy and Collegiate Seminary for Young Ladies.

Special Routes Census No. S-AD-46 (illustrated on p. 55). Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 23). Ex Antrim (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1958), Kilbourne, Kramer and Walske. With 1999 P.F. certificate

E. 75,000-100,000
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 91, Petersburg Va. To Victoria Tex.Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5), Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5)Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5). Position 1, large margins including top sheet margin, intense shade on deeply blued paper, well-tied by unusually clear strike of “Uniontown Ala. 9 Jun.” (1862) circular datestamp on brown cover to “John D. Pitts, Co. D, 4 Regiment Ala. Vol., Near Richmond Virginia”, faint vertical file fold well clear of provisional and markings

EXTREMELY FINE STAMP AND AN IMMACULATE COVER. ONLY EIGHT EXAMPLES OF THE UNIONTOWN POSTMASTER’S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ARE RECORDED, OF WHICH FIVE ARE SOUND STAMPS ON COVER.

Eight examples of the Uniontown 10c Red are recorded by us. These are (in order of plate position):

1) Pos. 1 with stationer’s embossed crest, on cover to Maria L. Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Kimmel, Haas, Birkinbine, D.K. collection (lot 1121)

2) Pos. 1 on cover to John D. Pitts, near Richmond Va., ex Ferrary, Caspary, “Isleham” (Peyton), Hill, the cover offered here

3) Pos. 2 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Dr. Simon, D.K. collection (lot 1120)

4) Pos. 2 on cover to Maria Louisa Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Brooks, Meroni, Kilbourne and Gross

5) Pos. 2 repaired stamp on repaired cover to Mrs. John B. Carey, ex Weill Stock

6) Pos. 3, corner crease, small tear, on lady’s embossed cover to Mr. Richmond Christian, Richmond Va., ex Hind

7) Pos. 4 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Sweet, Muzzy, Boker

8) Pos. 4 uncancelled on large piece dated Sep. 27 (1861) with part of addressee’s name “S. Price”, Virginia destination, ex Caspary

Very few post offices east of the Mississippi River issued and used 10c adhesive (A) or press-printed (E) provisionals. This small group is as follows: Baton Rouge La. (A--three known); Charleston S.C. (E--unique); Danville Va. (E--probably not used); Fincastle Va. (E--unique); Fredericksburg Va. (A--never used); Greenville Ala. (A--two known); Greenwood Depot Va. (A--six known); Knoxville Tenn. (A--unique; and E--rare used); Marion Va. (A--seven known on cover); Nashville Tenn. (A--six known on cover); Tellico Plains Tenn. (A--never used); and Uniontown Ala. (A--eight known, seven on covers). All other 10c provisionals were used in Texas or were issued as handstamped entires.

The addressee, John Davidson Pitts, was a member of the Canebrake Rifle Guards, Co. D., 4th Alabama Infantry. He was killed in action on June 27, 1862, the day of his 19th birthday, while storming the Federal breastworks at Gaines’ Mill in the third of the Seven Days’ Battles. This cover was probably in Private Pitts’ possession when he died. His body was hastily buried under an apple tree in the Watt’s orchard. It was later recovered by his father and removed to Uniontown. John’s father, Phillip Henry Pitts, kept an extensive diary that sadly recorded the retrieval of his boy’s body (source: www.cowanauctions.com ).

Ex Ferrary, Caspary, “Isleham” (Peyton) and Hill. Caspary’s note on back reads “Cost $3,500 1929”. “W.H.C.” Colson and Ferrary trefoil handstamps at lower right (Ferrary sale notation in pencil at left). With 2004 P.F. certificate.

40,000
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 8, Austin, Miss.Austin Miss., 5c Red on Amber entire (8XU1), Austin Miss., 5c Red on Amber entire (8XU1)Austin Miss., 5c Red on Amber entire (8XU1). Distinctive ornamental provisional design, typeset and press-printed on upper right corner of yellow-amber envelope to Mr. James Philpott, Wood Lawn Tenn., clearly-struck "Austin Miss. 1861 [inverted] 2 Dec." circular datestamp and "Paid" straightline struck over red provisional, lightly creased away from markings, slightly reduced at right but clear of design, right side also has slight wear at corners reinforced with backing paper

FINE. THE UNIQUE EXAMPLE OF THE AUSTIN, MISSISSIPPI, POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ENTIRE.

There are sixteen unique Confederate postmasters' provisional adhesives (A) or press-printed entires (E): Austin Miss. (E), Beaumont Tex. (A--large 10c), Bridgeville Ala. (A--pair), Charleston S.C. (E), Fincastle Va. (E), Franklin N.C. (E), Hallettsville Tex. (A), Hillsboro N.C. (A), Jetersville Va. (A--pair), Kingston Tenn. (E), Knoxville Tenn. (A--10c), Mt. Lebanon La. (A), New Smyrna Fla. (A), Port Lavaca Tex. (A), Rutherfordton N.C. (A) and Salisbury N.C. (E--damaged). This Austin entire was discovered by Harold C. Brooks in 1925 and to date is the only recorded example.

Ex Brooks and Wulfekuhler

20,000
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-04-27
U.S. & C.S.A. Postal History
c
Sale Number 810, Lot Number 1910, Confederate States Postmasters Provisionals (Marion to Memphis)Marion Va., 10c Black (55X2), Marion Va., 10c Black (55X2)Marion Va., 10c Black (55X2). Huge margins at left and bottom, vertical rule shows in left margin, full margins at top and right, very minor sealed tear at right touches "o" of "Marion", tied by well-struck "Marion Va. Mar. 2" (1862) circular datestamp on brown homemade cover to Kingston Tenn., cosmetic restoration around edges of cover (paper is entirely original and the stamp is untouched)

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ARGUABLY THE FINEST OF THE FIVE AVAILABLE COVERS BEARING THE MARION POSTMASTER'S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP.

The Marion Va. 5c and 10c provisional stamps, with their distinctive "Check" label at top, were issued by Postmaster J. H. Francis in 1861. The stamps were printed in two steps: first, the typeset form containing the border and words "P. Office, Marion, Va., Check. Paid" were impressed; then the values, "5" or "10" were handstamped on the blank center. Postmaster Francis described his stamps in a January 1880 letter to August Dietz, and he offered to make more from the "die" which he still possessed. Various "reprints" made from the typeset form were made by John W. Scott, including 2c, 15c and 20c values that have never been seen genuinely used.

Genuine Marion provisional stamps are extremely rare. Our records contain six covers with the Marion 10c provisional, plus a repaired stamp affixed to the back of a cover noted in the Crown book as part of the Worthington collection. There are two unused stamps and perhaps one or two off-cover stamps extant. Of the six known covers, one is part of the Tapling collection at the British Library (a sound example dated Oct. 15, 1861), two have stamps with a significant portion of the design cut away (dated Oct. 25 and Nov. 16, 1861), and one has the bottom right corner of the stamp repaired (dated Sep. 24, 1861, ex Caspary). Therefore, there remain only two covers available to collectors in essentially sound condition: the ex-Hessel cover (dated Nov. 18, 1861, with repairs to the cover) and the cover offered here, which is late use of the provisional stamp (Mar. 2, 1862).

Ex Freeland and Hill. With 1998 P.F. certificate (notes "closed tear")

12,000
62,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 12, Baton Rouge La.Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1), Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1)Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1). Calhoun Type D, large margins to full at top right, bright shade on fresh white paper, neatly tied by unusually clear strike of “Baton Rouge La. Sep. 27, 1861” circular datestamp on immaculate white droprate cover locally addressed to Jno. P. Behrnes

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THE FINEST OF THE SIX RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE BATON ROUGE 2-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP. AN OUTSTANDING 2-CENT CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL RARITY AND ONE OF THE GEMS OF THE SHARRER COLLECTION.

Of Scott No. 11X1 we record three unused, five used off cover or on piece, and five used on covers, for a total of 13 stamps. Of Scott No. 11X1a (“McCcrmick” error) we record three examples, including one unused stamp, one used off cover, and one used on cover. The cover offered here was described in the 1956 Caspary sale catalogue as “undoubtedly the finest in existence,” an opinion still supported by the record.

This particular 2c stamp is one of two known Baton Rouge provisionals (any denomination) with the Maltese Cross border showing a wider gap between the fifth and sixth ornaments at bottom (Calhoun Type D); every other recorded stamp shows the enlarged gap between the sixth and seventh ornaments at bottom. This stamp’s distinctive ornament arrangement is found at the top of Position 5 of the 5c setting and at the top of two examples of the 2c stamp. Most likely, the setting was altered between printings, and the top and bottom rows of ornaments were transposed.

Accompanied by a March 23, 1895, notarized statement from J. P. Behrnes (the addressee) attesting to the source and genuineness of the cover. Ex Caspary, Lightner, Lilly, Kilbourne and Gross. With 2009 P.F. certificate

27,500
62,500
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1066, Nashville, TennesseeNashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3), Nashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3)Nashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3). Two, full to large margins except righthand stamp just touched along upper right frameline, bright shade, tied by blue "Nashville Ten. Aug. 21, 1861" circular datestamp on Hanging Lincoln Cartoon cover to "Messr. B. S. W. Gafford & Co., Undertakers, Camden, Madison Cty., Miss.", reduced at right, faint stain spots, minor edge wear

VERY FINE. ONLY TWELVE EXAMPLES OF THE CELEBRATED HANGING LINCOLN ENVELOPE ARE RECORDED. THIS IS THE ONLY EXAMPLE WITH A SOUTHERN POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL STAMP. ONE OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND OUTSTANDING OF ALL CIVIL WAR ERA COVERS.

The Hanging Lincoln design is widely recognized as the most distinctive of all Civil War patriotics. In this extraordinary cartoon, President Lincoln is hanging upside down from a tree limb, with his symbolic axe and fence rail tied around his neck. The caption reads "Abe Lincoln the destroyer. He once split Rails. Now he has split the Union." To the left and right is the caption "The penalty of disregarding the constitution. Impeached, deposed, Tried and convicted" (there is a spelling correction from "diposed" to "deposed"). Standing beside Lincoln is a mustachioed Winfield Scott, labeled "Old Fuss n Feathers", dropping his sword and exclaiming "My glory is gone for ever." On the ground is the Union flag, captioned "The stars and stripes lie in the dust, Never to rise." A star at left has the caption "The southern star is rising" and the Confederate 11-star flag towers above with the caption "The stars and bars shall for ever wave triumphant." Along the bottom is the imprint "Copyright claimed. HM & WC Box 417 Nashville Tenn." Despite continuing investigation, we have been unable to uncover the identify of the publishers "HM & WC."

There are currently twelve recorded examples of the Hanging Lincoln cartoon envelope, all used within the Confederacy. This is the only one with a Postmaster's Provisional paying postage.

Illustrated in Crown and Wishnietzky books. Ex Caspary, Kimmel, Myers and Rudy. With 2004 P.F. certificate

E. 50,000-75,000
60,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1997-10-28
Confederate States
c
Sale Number 795, Lot Number 457, Postmasters ProvisionalsOakway S.C., 5c Black (115X1), Oakway S.C., 5c Black (115X1)Oakway S.C., 5c Black (115X1). Circular cut adhesive stamp tied by manuscript "Paid" with matching "Oakway S.C.} Sept. 18, 1861" postmark on buff cover to James E. Hagood at Pickens Court House S.C., receipt docketing on back indicating J. B. Sanders (Oakway postmaster) as the sender

FRESH AND VERY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE OAKWAY PROVISIONAL STAMP - BOTH ON COVERS TO THE SAME ADDRESSEE - THIS BEING THE EARLIER DATE AND THE ONLY ONE TIED BY THE CANCELLATION.

Jobbery Sanders was appointed postmaster of Oakway, South Carolina, in 1858 and continued in 1861 when the Confederate government assumed control over the postal system. Oakway's population in 1861 was only 200, and the volume of mail was too small to justify a wood or metal cancelling device, so Postmaster Sanders simply postmarked mail by hand. His provisional stamps were probably short-lived and used on a very limited basis prior to the arrival of General Issue postage in November 1861.

The Oakway provisional stamp was discovered as early as 1907, but only since 1975 has it received Scott Catalogue recognition. Research by the late Daniel T. Gilbert, who owned the other Oakway cover (dated Oct. 9, 1861, and ex Worthington), provided the historical evidence validating the provisional stamp. Soon after The Philatelic Foundation certified the Worthington-Gilbert cover as genuine, the September 18th ex-Ferrary cover was brought back to light by Raymond and Roger Weill, the renowned New Orleans dealers. The September 18th cover offered here has the "W.H.C." mark of Warren H. Colson, the preeminent dealer of the first half of the 20th century. The cover was in Colson's stock at the time of his death and was acquired by the Weills; however, its existence was not widely known until 1976.

Mr. Gilbert established the validity of the Oakway provisional by travelling to South Carolina in 1974 and meeting J. B. Sanders, the postmaster's grandson, who was 95 at the time. Sanders immediately recognized his grandfather's writing and remembered him saying that he made up his own stamps before supplies of regular stamps arrived. Details of Gilbert's findings were published in the Confederate Philatelist, Sept.-Oct. 1975, and news of the second cover appeared in the Nov.-Dec. 1976 issue of the same publication.

Ex Ferrary, Colson and Freeland. This great rarity is listed but unpriced in Scott.

E. 40,000-50,000
60,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2000-04-13
Confederate States Stamps and Covers
c
Sale Number 823, Lot Number 397, Postmasters Provisionals (Aberdeen to Beaumont)Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1), Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1)Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1). Position with comma after "Beaumont", full to large margins, neatly cancelled by ms. "X" with matching "Apl 9th/64" postmark on adversity cover made from lined paper, addressed to Mrs. Mary P. Watson at San Augustine Tex., the cover was turned and addressed to "Mrs. Maggie L. Watson, Sabine Pass, Texas", "Paid" and "10" handstamps (no town marking), some excess glue from flaps

AN EXTREMELY FINE BEAUMONT 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ON YELLOW PAPER -- ONE OF FIVE KNOWN EXAMPLES OF THIS RARITY -- USED ON A TURNED ADVERSITY COVER. THIS IS THE EARLIEST RECORDED EXAMPLE OF ANY BEAUMONT PROVISIONAL.

The Beaumont provisionals were issued on Pink (two shades) and Yellow paper. Only 21 of any kind are recorded, including the unique Large 10c on Yellow (on cover), 5 of the Small 10c on Yellow (each on cover), and 15 of the Small 10c on Pink (12 covers, 3 off cover). Most of the recorded covers are faulty, and only four have postmarks of any kind tying the stamps.

The five Small 10c Yellow covers we record are as follows: 1) ms. "X" cancel, not tied, ms. Apr. 9, 1864 date, to Mary J. Watson, San Augustine Tex., turned and addressed to Sabine Pass, the cover offered here, ex Hind; 2) tied by rimless town with ms. Jun. 11 (1864) date on turned cover to Mary J. Watson, San Augustine Tex., ex Caspary, Weatherly, Kilbourne (our Sale 815, realized $52,500 hammer); 3) uncancelled, used on turned cover to Mrs. Wm. B. Duncan, Liberty Tex., ex Caspary, Lilly; 4) ms. "X" cancel, not tied, used on cover to Cypress City Tex., Siegel Sale 226; and 5) ms. "10" cancel, not tied, rimless town with ms. Nov. 12 (1864) date on cover to James C. McKnight, Palestine Tex., 1864 docketing, ex Ferrary.

Although the Dietz catalogue identifies the June 11 cover (No. 2 above, ex Kilbourne) as the earliest known use in 1861, it is actually the second earliest use in 1864. The earliest cover is the one offered here, dated April 9, 1864.

The addressee at Sabine Pass is Mrs. Maggie L. Watson, wife of C. S. Watson, who was part of the Texas Marine Department. The June 11 cover (No. 2 above, ex Kilbourne) is addressed to C. S. Watson with the C.S. Steamer Sachem, one of two Federal gunboats captured by the Confederates at the famous Battle of Sabine Pass in September 1863. Sachem became part of the Texas Marine Department and served the Confederate army at Sabine Pass. In the spring of 1864, she was turned into a blockade runner under the command of John Davidson.

Ex Duveen and Hind.

25,000
60,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 72, Across-the-Lines Private Express Mail: Adams ExpressNashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6), Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6)Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6). Two huge margins, framelines touched at top and right, deep shade, scissors-cut at top left, tied by blue "Adams Express Co. Nashville Aug. 1" oval datestamp on 3c Red on White Star Die entire (U26) to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth in Petersburg Va., "Adams Ex. Co. * Louisville, Ky. * Jul. 30, 1861" circular datestamp cancels 3c embossed stamp, small red manuscript "2" express charge (two bits, or 25c), blue "10" handstamp applied at Petersburg to indicate postage due (presumably the letter was over the half-ounce weight limit), receipt docketing "Prof. Agnew & Sundry others", small part of backflap removed, light soiling and edgewear (slight improvement at top right corner)

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY COVERS WITH THE NASHVILLE 10-CENT PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE MIXED FRANKINGS WITH UNITED STATES POSTAGE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER THAT COMBINES THE RAREST ELEMENTS OF PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

Adams Express Company was required to ensure the prepayment of government postage (Federal and Confederate), although the letter was carried outside the regular mails. Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with across-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive).

Only three across-the-lines express covers are recorded with the Nashville 10c adhesive provisional (Special Routes Census Nos. S-AD-44, 45 and 46), all dated at Nashville on August 1. Only two of the 10c covers are mixed frankings (the third is used alone). These two Nashville 10c mixed-franking covers carried by Adams, both North-to-South usages, are the only 10c adhesive Confederate provisionals known in combination with United States postage. As such, they are quite significant artifacts from this remarkable period of postal history.

Our records contain six genuine covers with the Nashville 10c Green provisional: 1) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, to Hardy & Bros., Norfolk Va.; 2) Tied by Sep. 15, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to Shelbyville Tenn., ex Caspary; 3) 5c & 10c used together, tied by Aug. 21, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to D. Cleage, Athens Tenn., ex Caspary, Boshwit; 4) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die entire to Rev. Leavenworth, Petersburg Va., ex Kilbourne (Siegel Sale 815, lot 104, realized $90,000 hammer), the cover offered here; 5) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die with additional 3c 1857, to Albert F. Ryan, Norfolk Va., ex Gallagher; and 6) Tied by "10" rate handstamp, Sep. 18, 1861, Nashville datestamp, on building corner card cover to Thos. H. Caldwell, Shelbyville Tenn., ex Needham, Kimmell, Haas, Rudy (Siegel Sale 874, lot 117, realized $25,000 hammer).

The addressee, Reverend Abner Johnson Leavenworth, was at this time the principal and proprietor of the Leavenworth Academy and Collegiate Seminary for Young Ladies.

Special Routes Census No. S-AD-46 (illustrated on p. 55). Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 23). Ex Antrim (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1958), Kilbourne and Kramer. With 1999 P.F. certificate

E. 75,000-100,000
60,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 56, Livingston, Ala.Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1), Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1)Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1). Full to huge margins showing part of adjoining stamp above, bottom right margin clears frameline, beautiful rich color, neatly tied by "Livingston Ala. Nov. 15" (1861) circular datestamp on light yellow cover to Mrs. M. A. Sturdivant, Hollow Square Ala., sender's "Chg box 102" notation

EXTREMELY FINE. THE FINEST SINGLE FRANKING AMONG THE SEVEN RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE LIVINGSTON PROVISIONAL, A STRIKING PICTORIAL STAMP THAT DEPICTS THE SOUTHERN SHIELD AND ALLEGORICAL FIGURES.

Livingston is the county seat of Sumter County, Alabama, lying on the Selma and Meriden Railroad line about 130 miles north of Mobile, near the state's western border. Official records name Stephen W. Murley as the Livingston postmaster in 1861, while other sources attribute the provisional stamp to another postmaster, Robert F. Houston. The Livingston provisional is known used in November-December 1861 and again in March 1862.

Our records contain a total of 11 stamps, including the famous and unique pair on cover (Nov. 12, 1861), 6 singles on separate covers (1861--Nov. 15, Nov. 15, Nov. 25, Dec. 10; 1862--Mar. 17 and Mar. 21), and 3 off-cover stamps. One of the single frankings, a corner-margin stamp (Nov. 25 date, ex Caspary, Antrim and Cole), was severely damaged through negligent restoration. The other four single-franked covers are attractive, but none equals the offered cover's condition. Stanley B. Ashbrook described this item as "really a superb cover and the finest Livingston that I have ever seen." (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945)

Only two Confederate post offices, Livingston and Mobile, issued stamps with a pictorial design. It is almost certain that the same printer was responsible for both, whose imprint "W. R. Robertson Mobile" appears on the Mobile lithographic stones. The composition of the Livingston plate is not known, but a pane of 20 subjects may be reasonably conjectured.

This cover is offered in the open market for the first time ever. It was purchased privately by Harold C. Brooks, and when the Brooks collection was dispersed, this Livingston (one of two owned by Brooks) was sold privately to A. Earl Weatherly. In 1963 the Kilbournes purchased the cover directly from Weatherly.

Signed Ashbrook

30,000
60,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
 
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 30, Galveston Tex. To Helena Tex.Helena Tex., 5c Black on Buff (38X1), Helena Tex., 5c Black on Buff (38X1)Helena Tex., 5c Black on Buff (38X1). Large even margins, clear impression on fresh paper, cancelled by “Helena Tex.” circular datestamp, two tiny tears in margin at top, small thin spots

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED 5-CENT HELENA, TEXAS, POSTMASTER’S PROVISIONAL STAMPS. ALL THREE ARE OFF COVER AND ONLY THIS STAMP HAS A CLEAR CANCELLATION.

There are five recorded examples of the provisional stamps issued by Helena postmaster, David W. Dailey, including three 5c and two 10c, all off cover. The three 5c stamps are as follows:

1) Uncancelled, four margins, creases, toned spot, ex Lilly (Siegel Sale 317, lot 318)

2) Helena town datestamp, four margins, small thin spots, tiny tears, ex Caspary, Lightner, Dr. Graves, “Beverly Hills”, “Camina” (Castillejo) and Dr. Maffeo, the stamp offered here

3) Indistinct cancel, close at top, margins on other sides, thin and stain, printing on back, ex Steves, Caspary

Illustrated in Deaton’s The Great Texas Stamp Collection (page 66). Ex Caspary, Lightner, Dr. Graves, “Beverly Hills”, “Camina” (Castillejo) and Dr. Maffeo. With 1994 P.F. certificate. Scott Catalogue states “Used examples are valued with small faults or repairs, as all recorded have faults”

6,000
60,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2000-04-13
Confederate States Stamps and Covers
c
Sale Number 823, Lot Number 501, General Issues on Cover (Nos. 8 and 9)10c Blue, "TEN" (9), 10c Blue, "TEN" (9)10c Blue, "TEN" (9). Horizontal strip of seven, large margins all around, tied by five strikes of "Darlington C.H. S.C. Jun. 2" circular datestamp on large blue courthouse cover to Marianna Fla., court docketing at left also ties end stamp in strip, light bend thru center stamp, couple tiny scrapes in margins, cover has typical edge wear and faint stains, but this artifact is in its original condition as discovered

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE LARGEST USED MULTIPLE OF THE RARE 10-CENT "TEN" ISSUE ON OR OFF COVER -- NO OTHER COMES CLOSE TO THIS STRIP'S SIZE OR QUALITY. IN OUR OPINION, THIS COVER IS ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING ITEMS IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY, AND IT IS OFFERED FOR THE FIRST TIME AT AUCTION SINCE ITS DISCOVERY NEARLY A CENTURY AGO.

A photograph of this extraordinary cover appears in the 1929 Dietz book (page 275), and its existence is noted among the listings for the 10c "TEN" issue. However, the cover was previously owned by Edward S. Knapp and was sold to John H. Hall after Knapp's Confederate collection was dispersed privately. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first offering of this cover at public auction.

Ex Knapp.

E. 10,000-15,000
57,500
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2000-05-13
2000 Rarities of the World
c
Sale Number 824, Lot Number 439, Confederate States Postmasters ProvisionalsMadison Court House Fla., 3c Gold on Bluish (3AX1), Madison Court House Fla., 3c Gold on Bluish (3AX1)Madison Court House Fla., 3c Gold on Bluish (3AX1). Bottom right corner sheet margins, large left margin and ample at top, cancelled by "Paid" in oval, used on buff cover to Thomas W. Thompson, Washington D.C., with dateline in same hand on clipped piece "Madison, Florida, Feb. 13, 1861", refolded around edges to improve appearance and stamp moved slightly from original position

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE MADISON POSTMASTER'S 3-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP USED ON COVER. AN EXTRAORDINARY 1861 PROVISIONAL WITH UNITED STATES RATE, USED FROM THE CONFEDERATE STATE OF FLORIDA TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. THIS IS THE EARLIEST DATE OF ANY PROVISIONAL USED IN THE CONFEDERACY.

Only five examples of Scott 3AX1 are recorded, in addition to the one "CNETS" error (3AX1a). This is the only known cover with the Madison 3c provisional, and its dated contents -- February 13, 1861 -- place it within nine days of the formation of the seven original Confederate States, which included Florida. It is the earliest of all postmasters' provisionals used in the Confederate States.

Ex Ferrary, Duveen, Hind and Caspary. Small "W.H.C." mark of Warren H. Colson at lower right. With 1996 C.S.A. certificate. Listed but unpriced in Scott.

E. 30,000-40,000
57,500
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2004-04-27
The Jeanette C. Rudy Collection of Tennessee Postal History
c
Sale Number 874, Lot Number 115, Nashville Postmasters ProvisionalsNashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3), Nashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3)Nashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3). Two, one with full to large margins, other full to large except just touched along upper right frameline, bright shades, tied by blue "Nashville Ten. Aug. 21, 1861" circular datestamp on Hanging Lincoln Cartoon cover to Camden Miss., reduced at right, faint stain spots, minor edge wear

VERY FINE. ONLY TWELVE EXAMPLES OF THE CELEBRATED HANGING LINCOLN ENVELOPE ARE RECORDED. THIS IS THE ONLY EXAMPLE WITH A CONFEDERATE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL STAMP. ONE OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND OUTSTANDING OF ALL CONFEDERATE STATES COVERS.

The Hanging Lincoln design is widely recognized as the most distinctive of all Confederate patriotics. In this extraordinary cartoon, President Lincoln is hanging upside down from a tree limb, with his symbolic axe and fence rail tied around his neck. The caption reads "Abe Lincoln the destroyer. He once split Rails. Now he has split the Union." To the left and right is the caption "The penalty of disregarding the constitution. Impeached, deposed, Tried and convicted" (there is a spelling correction from "diposed" to "deposed"). Standing beside Lincoln is a mustachioed Winfield Scott, labeled "Old Fuss n Feathers", dropping his sword and exclaiming "My glory is gone for ever." On the ground is the Union flag, captioned "The stars and stripes lie in the dust, Never to rise." A star at left has the caption "The southern star is rising" and the Confederate 11-star flag towers above with the caption "The stars and bars shall for ever wave triumphant." Along the bottom is the imprint "Copyright claimed. HM & WC Box 417 Nashville Tenn."

According to a census by the late John R. Hill Jr. (updated with two new discoveries), there are twelve genuine Hanging Lincoln patriotics (listed in date order): 1) Jul. 25, 1861, Marshall Tex. Paid 10; 2) Aug. 21, 1861, Nashville Tenn., two 5c provisionals, the cover offered here; 3) Aug. 30, 1861, Athens La. "Paid X", ex Hall (Siegel Sale 840, lot 27, realized $13,000); 4) Nov. 2, 1861, Bowling Green Ky., ex Dr. Howard Green (Siegel Sale 822, lot 225, realized $28,000); 5) Jan. 1, 1862, Nashville Ten., 5c Olive Green (Siegel 2003 Rarities sale, lot 644, realized $6,500); 6) Jan. 4, 1862, Nashville Ten., 5c Olive Green; 7) Feb. 20, 1862, Cumberland Gap Ten., ms. Paid 5 (Siegel Sale 772, lot 3268, realized $19,000); 8) Apr. 15, 1862, Cartersville Miss., ms. Due 5; 9) Apr. 15, 1862, Camden Miss., 10c Rose; 10) Jun. 24, 1862, Camden Miss., 10c Pale Rose; 11) date unknown to JRH, West Union S.C., ms. Due 5; and 12) privately carried and not postally used. In addition, there is a genuine envelope with fake markings and a stamp added.

Illustrated in Crown and Wishnietzky books. Ex Caspary, Kimmell and Myers.

E. 75,000-100,000
57,500
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1994-02-24
The "Camina" Collection of Texas Postal History
c
Sale Number 757, Lot Number 611, Confederate Postmasters ProvisionalsBeaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X3), Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X3)Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X3). Single with large to enormous margins, canceled by faint town handstamp on yellow cover to Liberty Texas, additional strike at lower left, "Beaumont Tex." nearly rimless town handstamp, without date, stamp with some gum toning and moved from top edge of cover, the latter with slight reduction at left and small erosion at bottom

THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THIS STAMP AND WIDELY REGARDED AS ONE OF THE MAJOR CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL COVERS

Provisionals issued by the Beaumont post office are known in two different sizes. The smaller size is recorded on yellow and pink paper, either of which is rare. The so-called "large Beaumont", of which only one example is known, has greater width and height, and contains additional words, "Texas" and "Postage", as well as ornaments above and below the five lines of type. The single known example on the cover offered in this sale was discovered by a collector, Fred Green, among the papers of the Duncan family, which he purchased intact. It was later acquired by George Walcott, who in turn sold it to Charles Phillips, the British dealer. Phillips presumably sold the large Beaumont to Alfred H. Caspary, for it was included among the outstanding Confederate provisionals in the 1956 Caspary sale. There it realized $2,000, passing through the Weill Brothers into the collection of Camille Lightner, which was later purchased privately by the Weills. The large Beaumont was sold to Josiah K. Lilly, and, at our April 27, 1967, auction of his provisonals it brought $9,000, once again selling to the Weills. The next collector to own this unique stamp was the Reverend Paul Freeland, whose important Confederate collection was acquired privately by the Weills. After the Weill stock was dispersed in 1989, the Large Beaumont was acquired in a transaction negotiated between Elizabeth C. Pope (on behalf of the owner) and Charles F. Deaton (on behalf of the present owner).

Illustrated in Dietz (1959 edition), Life, "World's Rarest Stamps (May 3, 1954), Ex Green, Walcott, Caspary, Lightner, Lilly, Freeland, Weill

100,000
55,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 60, Macon, Ga.Macon Ga., 2c Black on Gray Green Wove (53X5), Macon Ga., 2c Black on Gray Green Wove (53X5)Macon Ga., 2c Black on Gray Green Wove (53X5). Margins clear to just touching ornamental frame, neatly tied by "Macon Ga. -- 7" double-circle datestamp on small drop-rate cover to Dr. G. E. Carleton in Macon, some writing erased from left side

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF FOUR RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE MACON 2-CENT PROVISIONAL (THREE ON COVERS) AND THE FINER OF TWO COVERS ON WHICH THE STAMP IS TIED BY THE TOWN DATESTAMP. ONE OF THE RAREST STAMPS IN THE WORLD -- FAR RARER, IN FACT, THAN A HAWAIIAN 2-CENT MISSIONARY.

The Macon 2c is one of six 2c provisional stamps issued by Confederate post offices, and it is the rarest of the group (the Uniontown 2c is represented by two covers and the unique sheet of four, unused). Our records contain only four examples of the Macon 2c, including another cover to Dr. Carleton with the stamp tied by the double-circle ("2" but no month visible) -- the cover has a large piece torn from the front of the envelope (ex Caspary). The third cover is addressed locally to Col. Jno. B. Lamar with the stamp tied by a "Paid" straightline and no other markings (ex Caspary). A fourth stamp is known on piece tied by the "Paid" straightline (ex Deats, P.F. photo files).

The Crown book lists a fourth 2c cover addressed to Mrs. Howell Cobb, Athens Ga., which was attributed to the Meta Heathcote collection, but the accuracy of this listing is questionable. There is no photographic confirmation of the Heathcote cover, and, if addressed to Mrs. Howell Cobb in Athens, it should have a 5c stamp, not a 2c. A few Macon covers to Mrs. Cobb in Athens do exist (all 5c), and we feel certain that the fourth 2c cover in the Crown census is based on one of these 5c covers, which was entered with erroneous data in one of the earlier surveys. Of course, if someone can produce the fourth 2c cover, we stand corrected.

Of the three confirmed covers, this and the "Paid" cover are in comparably choice condition. Use of the town datestamp to cancel (and tie) the stamp is a desirable feature of this cover. Although the month is not visible, it is very likely to be July or August, based on other recorded covers. It is a peculiarity of the Macon datestamp that the day numeral is strongly impressed, while the month is weakly struck or altogether absent.

Ex Ferrary, Hind and Brooks. Upon dispersal of the Brooks collection, it was sold privately to A. Earl Weatherly and then privately in 1963 to the Kilbournes; therefore, this cover is offered in the open market for the first time since the 1933 Hind auction.

15,000
55,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1120, Uniontown, AlabamaUniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5), Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5)Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5). Position 2 -- the only position with the "Lobe" corner ornaments at the top and the "88 Loop" ornaments at the bottom corners, as well as the "88 Loops" beneath "Paid", making it easily distinguishable from the other positions -- large even margins all around, rich color on deeply blued paper, well tied by "Uniontown Ala. Apr. 21" (1862) circular datestamp (month and day inverted) on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C.

EXTREMELY FINE STAMP AND AN IMMACULATE COVER. ONLY EIGHT EXAMPLES OF THE UNIONTOWN POSTMASTER'S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ARE RECORDED, OF WHICH FIVE ARE SOUND STAMPS ON COVER. ONLY TWO SOUND EXAMPLES OF THE 10-CENT FROM THE DISTINCTIVE POSITION 2 SETTING ARE KNOWN.

Uniontown's postmaster at the start of the C.S.A. postal system was Parham N. Booker. Parham, one of eleven children, was the namesake son of a U.S. internal revenue officer. The senior Booker represented Madison County in the legislature in 1836 and moved to Uniontown sometime later. He became a planter and hotel keeper, and he also served as postmaster and mayor of the town. Booker Senior died in 1861, and we are not certain if both father and son ran the post office. Because of a permanent physical disability, Booker Junior did not serve in the Confederate Army, but served the government in a civil department.

Postmaster Booker issued three denominations of adhesive provisionals: 2c, 5c and 10c. They were probably typeset and printed at the offices of the local newspaper, the Weekly Herald. The same typeset form of four subjects was used to print all three values (although the spacing between subjects changed between two 5c printings). The numeral in parentheses between the "PA" and "ID" of "PAID" was changed for each value, and different color ink was used: Dark Blue (2c), Green (5c) and Red (10c). All three values were printed on Gray Blue paper, and the 2c and 5c are also known on White paper, which was probably used for subsequent printings. The 10c has not been found on White paper.

Eight examples of the Uniontown 10c Red are recorded by us. These are (in order of plate position): 1) Pos. 1 with stationer's embossed crest, on cover to Maria L. Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Kimmel, Haas, Birkinbine, offered in this sale as lot 1121; 2) Pos. 1 on cover to John D. Pitts, Richmond Va., ex Ferrary, Caspary and "Isleham" (Peyton); 3) Pos. 2 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Dr. Simon, the cover offered here; 4) Pos. 2 on cover to Maria Louisa Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Brooks, Meroni, Kilbourne and Gross; 5) Pos. 2 repaired stamp on repaired cover to Mrs. John B. Carey, ex Weill Stock; 6) Pos. 3, corner crease, small tear, on lady's embossed cover to Mr. Richmond Christian, Richmond Va., ex Hind; 7) Pos. 4 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Sweet, Muzzy, Boker; and 8) Pos. 4 uncancelled on large piece dated Sep. 27 (1861) with part of addressee's name "S. Price", Virginia destination, ex Caspary.

Very few post offices east of the Mississippi River issued and used 10c adhesive (A) or press-printed (E) provisionals. This small group is as follows: Baton Rouge La. (A -- three known); Charleston S.C. (E -- unique, see lot 330); Danville Va. (E -- probably not used); Fincastle Va. (E -- unique); Fredericksburg Va. (A -- never used); Greenville Ala. (A -- two known); Greenwood Depot Va. (A -- six known); Knoxville Tenn. (A -- unique; and E -- rare used); Marion Va. (A -- seven known on cover); Nashville Tenn. (A -- six known on cover); Tellico Plains Tenn. (A -- never used); and Uniontown Ala. (A -- eight known, seven on covers). All other 10c provisionals were used in Texas or were issued as handstamped entires.

The addressee on this cover, Col. Andrew P. Calhoun, was the eldest son of the famous Southern statesman and States' Rights advocate, John C. Calhoun. The correspondence containing three covers with Uniontown provisionals was found in Pendleton S.C. sometime shortly before they were reported in March 1934 by R. T. Freeman, a dealer in Atlanta Ga. who purchased the group. One cover has an enormous sheet-margin pair of the 5c on White (ex Caspary), and the two other covers have 10c stamps (Nos. 3 and 7 in the list above). This cover was illustrated in the March 24, 1934, Stamps article reporting the discovery, and the article stated that the cover has "already been sold." If so, Daniel F. Kelleher was the buyer, and he in turn sold it in November 1934.

Illustrated in 1986 Dietz catalogue (page 16). Source notation on back "IJXXX Kelleher Nov. 1934 $4000". Ex Dr. Simon

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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
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Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1107, Oakway, South CarolinaOakway S.C., 5c Black (115X1), Oakway S.C., 5c Black (115X1)Oakway S.C., 5c Black (115X1). Circular cut handstamped adhesive tied by manuscript "Paid" with matching "Oakway S.C.} Sept. 18, 1861" manuscript postmark on buff cover to James E. Hagood at Pickens Court House S.C., receipt docketing on back indicating J. B. Sanders (Oakway postmaster) as the sender

FRESH AND VERY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE OAKWAY PROVISIONAL STAMP -- BOTH ON COVERS TO THE SAME ADDRESSEE -- THIS BEING THE EARLIER DATE AND THE ONLY ONE TIED BY THE CANCELLATION.

Jobbery Sanders was appointed postmaster of Oakway, South Carolina, in 1858 and continued as the town's Confederate postmaster. Oakway's population in 1861 was only 200, and the volume of mail was too small to justify a wood or metal cancelling device, so Postmaster Sanders simply postmarked mail by hand. His primitive handstamped adhesive provisional stamps were probably short-lived and used on a very limited basis prior to the arrival of General Issue postage.

The Oakway provisional stamp was discovered as early as 1907, but only since 1975 has it received Scott Catalogue recognition. Research by the late Daniel T. Gilbert, who owned the other Oakway cover (dated Oct. 9, 1861, ex Worthington), provided the historical evidence validating the provisional stamp. Soon after the Worthington-Gilbert cover was certified as genuine by The Philatelic Foundation, the September 18 ex-Ferrary cover was submitted for certification by the Weills on behalf of the owner, the Rev. Paul B. Freeland. The September 18 cover offered here has the "W.H.C." mark of Warren H. Colson, the preeminent dealer of the first half of the 20th century. The cover was in Colson's stock at the time of his death in 1963 and was acquired by the Weills; however, its existence was not widely known until 1976.

Mr. Gilbert established the validity of the Oakway provisional by traveling to South Carolina in 1974 and meeting J. B. Sanders, the postmaster's grandson, who was 95 at the time. Sanders immediately recognized his grandfather's writing and remembered him saying that he made up his own stamps before supplies of regular stamps arrived. Details of Gilbert's findings were published in the Confederate Philatelist (September-October 1975), and news of the second cover (offered here) appeared in the November-December 1976 issue of the same publication.

Ex Ferrary, Colson, Freeland, Dr. Graves and Birkinbine

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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1997-05-06
1997 Rarities of the World
c
Sale Number 788, Lot Number 305, Confederate StatesKnoxville Tenn., 10c Green (47X3), Knoxville Tenn., 10c Green (47X3)Knoxville Tenn., 10c Green (47X3). Large margins, fresh color, tied by double-struck Knoxville large circular datestamp on homemade bluish green cover to Mrs. Jane M. Tiller, Ashland Va., one side flap removed, stamp has been lifted to check laid lines of paper and hinged in place

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE 10-CENT KNOXVILLE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, ON OR OFF COVER, AND ONE OF THE CELEBRATED ITEMS OF CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

This famous Confederate provisional stamp on cover was discovered by O. D. Walbridge in 1886 and sold to J. S. Smith in 1892. Smith sold the cover to F. T. Hoyt in the same year, and it soon passed to Count Philippe la Renotiere von Ferrary. The cover was sold as lot 11 in the June 15-16, 1922, Gilbert auction of Ferrary's collection. It then realized 6,200 francs plus the 17-1/2% government surtax, for a total of approximately $650. By comparison, the Grove Hill provisional cover sold in the same sale for approximately $735. The next public offering of the Knoxville 10c cover took place in March 1956 at the Caspary sale held by H. R. Harmer (lot 167, $2,900). The cover later became part of the Josiah K. Lilly collection, selling at our April 1967 Lilly auction as lot 324 for $8,500.

Illustrated in Life (May 3, 1954), "Stamp Album Worth $1,000,000". Ex Walbridge, Smith, Hoyt, Ferrary, Caspary and Lilly. With 1993 P.F. certificate

E. 60,000-80,000
52,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
ngbl
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 152, Uniontown, Ala.Uniontown Ala., 2c Dark Blue on White (86X2), Uniontown Ala., 2c Dark Blue on White (86X2)Uniontown Ala., 2c Dark Blue on White (86X2). Pane of four, unused (no gum), huge margins all around, creases with slight soiling and tiny pinpoint breaks in paper

THE CELEBRATED AND UNIQUE PANE OF THE UNIONTOWN 2-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, DISCOVERED BY THE WEILLS OF NEW ORLEANS IN 1938. NO OTHER EXAMPLES OF THIS PRINTING ON WHITE PAPER ARE KNOWN, AND ONLY TWO OTHER UNIONTOWN 2-CENT STAMPS ARE RECORDED (EACH ON COVER). AN EXTRAORDINARY SURVIVAL OF ONE OF THE RAREST STAMPS IN THE WORLD.

The Uniontown 2c provisional is one of six 2c provisional stamps issued by Confederate post offices. The Uniontown and Macon provisionals are the rarest of this group. Of the Macon 2c, just four stamps are known, three on cover. The Uniontown 2c is represented by this sheet on white paper (the only examples recorded on this paper) and two covers with the 2c on Gray Blue paper, both drop-rate usages, one with a Position 1 top left corner copy (ex Caspary) and the other with a Position 2 top right corner copy (ex Hessel). We know of no other example to justify the off-cover listings in Scott and Dietz for 86X1 or 86X2, but would welcome such additions to our records.

In an account by telephone, Raymond H. Weill recollected that in 1938 the 2c sheet was brought to the Weills in New Orleans by a women who had family correspondence from Uniontown. Enclosed with one of the letters inside a cover was the 2c sheet, and the letter commented that these stamps were being used in Uniontown. Regrettably, the letter has long since vanished. The Weills sent the sheet to Alfred H. Caspary, asking for his opinion of genuineness, because the 2c stamp was not listed on white paper, and offering him the sheet. Caspary declared it genuine, but declined the offer, explaining that he was concentrating on covers. Later in 1938, John Klemann of Nassau Stamp Company visited the Weills and bought the sheet, presumably hoping to sell it to Caspary and unaware that the offer had already been made. The sheet remained in Nassau's inventory until the stock was sold in a 1953 H. R. Harmer auction, at which sale the sheet was bought by a Birmingham Ala. collector named Scruggs. It was subsequently donated to Father Flanagan's Boys Town and sold for their benefit in 1991 at an auction by Superior in Los Angeles. Charles Kilbourne acquired the sheet at the Boys Town auction.

This 2c sheet perfectly illustrates the relative positions of the four different subjects, which are distinctive in the style and arrangement of the corner ornaments and hyphens after the letters "CSA". The solid oval-shaped ornaments (Losenge) are found in the four corners of Positions 1, 3 and 4. Only Position 2 (upper right) has the Lobe corner ornaments at the top and the Loop ornaments at the bottom corners, as well as the Loops beneath "Paid", making it easily distinguishable from the other positions. Only Position 3 (lower left) has the Losenge corner ornaments at right turned in the wrong direction and the Lobe ornament used instead of the Loop at top (third from the left). Positions 1 and 4 are configured similarly to each other, with Losenge ornaments in the same directions in all four corners; they differ in the "CSA" type arrangement -- Position 1 has no hyphen after "A", while Position 4 has a hyphen.

With 1987 A.P.S. certificate

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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 133, Petersburg, Va.Petersburg Va., 5c Red (65X1), Petersburg Va., 5c Red (65X1)Petersburg Va., 5c Red (65X1). Position 10, bottom right corner sheet margin and large margins all around, used with General Issue 5c Green, Stone 2 (1), ample margins to slightly in at bottom right, tied together by single bold strike of blue "Petersburg Va. Feb. 7" (1862) circular datestamp on buff cover to F. P. Leavenworth, Van Buren Ark.

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF EIGHT RECORDED COVERS SHOWING CONJUNCTIVE USE OF CONFEDERATE POSTMASTERS' PROVISIONALS AND THE GENERAL ISSUE. ONLY FOUR OF THESE COVERS HAVE ADHESIVE PROVISIONALS, AND ONLY TWO ARE KNOWN WITH THE PETERSBURG STAMP. IN MANY RESPECTS, WE CONSIDER THIS TO BE ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING CONFEDERATE COVERS EXTANT.

We record a total of eight covers with combinations of Confederate provisionals (either adhesive or handstamped) and General Issue stamps to prepay postage -- we have excluded from this count a few covers on which the provisional served no postal duty. In our opinion, these combination frankings are significant and quite undervalued -- imagine what price would be paid for a Baltimore provisional handstamped entire with a U.S. 5c 1847 stamp, or a St. Louis "Bear" and 1847 combination.

The following is a list of the eight mixed-franking covers: 1) Columbia S.C. (18XU1) and 5c Green (1), Jan. 4, 1862, our Sale 810, lot 1862; 2) Columbia S.C. (18XU1) and 5c Green (1), Jan. 1, 1862, Crown book, p. 80; 3) Columbia S.C. (18XU1) and 5c Blue, Local (7), Sep. 1, 1862, our Sale 810, lot 1861; 4) Charleston S.C. (16X1, repaired) and 5c Blue, London (6), Aug. 5, 1862; 5) Memphis Tenn. 5c Red entire (56XU2) and 5c Green (1), date unclear, Siegel 1983 Rarities sale, lot 357; 6) New Orleans La. 5c Brown on Blue (62X4) and 5c Green (1), Jan. 11, 1862, Siegel 1983 Rarities sale, lot 371; 7) Petersburg Va. 5c Red (65X1) and 5c Green (1), Jan. 5, 1862, ex Muzzy; and 8) Petersburg Va. 5c Red (65X1) and 5c Green (1), Feb. 7, 1862, the cover offered here.

Illustrated in Stamp Specialist (Emerald Book, 1946, p. 39). Signed Ashbrook. Ex Brown, Brooks and Weatherly (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1963)

E. 30,000-40,000
52,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-02-26
The Benjamin Wishnietsky Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 1064, Lot Number 23, Discontinuance of Mail Routes incl. Southn. Letter UnpaidSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp ties 12c Black, Plate 3 (36B) and 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26) on lady's embossed cover to Paris, France, addressed to "Monsieur Hippolyte Messant, place Dauphine No. 14" (presumably Hippolyte Villemessant of Figaro fame), "New Orleans La. 10 Jun." (1861) circular datestamp and blue crayon "10" for prepaid Confederate postage, released from Louisville on June 27, "New York 9 Jun. 29" debit datestamp also ties stamps, manuscript "Due 15" (cents) applied in U.S. and "8" decimes due handstamp applied in France, red French transit datestamp (Jul. 13), Paris receiving backstamps (Jul. 13), 3c with perfs trimmed at top, 12c blunted perfs at bottom -- totally inconsequential flaws

VERY FINE. ONE OF ONLY TWO RECORDED "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVERS BEARING THE 12-CENT 1860 ISSUE AND ONE OF ONLY FIVE TO A FOREIGN DESTINATION. A SUPERB USE AND THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE WISHNIETSKY CONFEDERATE STATES COLLECTION.

The U.S. May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north.

With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp.

Because the U.S.-France treaty had a provision for unpaid mail, this cover was allowed to go through the U.S. mails with no postage due until arrival in France. Two covers from this correspondence are known, both identically addressed on the same embossed envelopes. They were carried together in the mail postmarked at New Orleans on June 10. The other cover (pictured on the cover of Special Mail Routes) has the Louisville June 27 datestamp and a second strike of the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking. They were presumably released on the same day, which means that the Louisville office did not mark letters in a consistent manner.

There are 29 "Southern Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication). The five recorded foreign-bound covers are as follows: 1) Louisville June 27, from St. Francisville La. to Prussia; 2) Louisville June 27, from Bayou Chene La. to France, ex Wunsch and Myers (Siegel Sale 882, lot 2001); 3) Louisville June 27, from New Orleans to France (the other cover bearing Scott Nos. 36B and 26 and from the same correspondence as the cover offered here), Steven C. Walske collection, pictured on the front cover of the Special Routes book; 4) no Louisville datestamp, franked with Scott Nos. 36B and 26, from New Orleans to France, ex Antrim, the cover offered here; and 5) Louisville Jul. 11, from Petersburg Va. to England, 24c 1860, ex Matthies and Dr. Graves

Special Routes Census No. SLU-8. Ex Antrim

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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
 
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 18, Baton Rouge La.Baton Rouge La., 10c Blue (11X4), Baton Rouge La., 10c Blue (11X4)Baton Rouge La., 10c Blue (11X4). Calhoun Type B, large even margins, Dark Blue shade, cancelled by perfectly clear strike of “Baton Rouge La. Oct. 3, 1861” circular datestamp, small sealed tear at upper right and thin spot at top, these very trivial flaws do not affect appearance

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF ONLY THREE RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE 10-CENT BATON ROUGE PROVISIONAL. AN INSTANTLY RECOGNIZABLE MAJOR PHILATELIC RARITY.

The three recorded 10c Baton Rouge stamps -- one on cover and two used off cover -- are as follows:

1) Tied by Dec. 7, 1861 datestamp on General Land Office cover to Lake Charles La., ex Ridpath, Caspary, Lightner, Freeland, Dr. Graves, Weill Brothers’ Stock.

2) Oct. 3, 1861 datestamp, Dark Blue shade, four margins, small sealed tear and thin spot, ex Ferrary, Hind, Caspary, Dr. Graves, Weill Brothers’ Stock, Dr. Maffeo, the stamp offered here

3) Oct. 1861 datestamp, margins at sides, slightly in at top and bottom, natural wrinkle, ex Dr. Graves, Weill Brothers’ Stock

Illustrated in 1929 Dietz book. Ex Ferrary, Hind, Caspary, Dr. Graves, Weill Brothers’ Stock and Dr. Maffeo. With 1990 P.F. certificate.

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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 14, Beaumont, TexasBeaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1), Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1)Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1). Position with "Beaumont" showing broken "T" and no period or comma after name, large margins to just touched at bottom right corner, tied by "Beaumont Tex" circular town handstamp with "June 11" (1864) date in ms. (touches and ties edge of stamp), "Paid" straightline handstamp on adversity cover made from Confederate naval form, addressed to Mrs. Mary P. Watson at San Augustine Tex., ms. "OB" (official Business) endorsement crossed out, the cover was turned and addressed back to "C. S. Watson, C.S. Str. Sachem, Sabine Pass, Texas", "San Augustine Tex. Jun. 20" (1864) circular datestamp, "Paid" and "10" handstamps, right side reduced but not affecting stamp, bottom right corner clipped, paper has been added to edge to improve appearance, small erosion spot in "W" of address

A VERY FINE BEAUMONT 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ON YELLOW PAPER -- ONE OF FIVE KNOWN EXAMPLES OF THIS RARITY -- USED ON A TURNED ADVERSITY COVER FROM A MEMBER OF THE TEXAS MARINE BRIGADE ABOARD THE C.S.S. SACHEM. THIS IS THE ONLY COVER KNOWN WITH THE BEAUMONT PROVISIONAL TIED BY THE TOWN MARKING.

The Beaumont provisionals were issued on Pink (two shades) and Yellow paper. Only 21 of any kind are recorded, including the unique Large 10c on Yellow (on cover), 5 of the Small 10c on Yellow (each on cover), and 15 of the Small 10c on Pink (12 covers, 3 off cover). Most of the recorded covers are faulty, and only four have postmarks of any kind tying the stamps; this is the only cover known with the handstamped marking tying the provisional.

The five Small 10c Yellow covers we record are as follows: 1) ms. "X" cancel, not tied, ms. Apr. 9, 1864 date, to Mary J. Watson, San Augustine Tex., ex Hind; 2) tied by rimless town with ms. Jun. 11 (1864) date on turned cover to Mary J. Watson, San Augustine Tex., ex Caspary, Weatherly, the cover offered here; 3) uncancelled, used on turned cover to Mrs. Wm. B. Duncan, Liberty Tex., ex Caspary, Lilly; 4) ms. "X" cancel, not tied, used on cover to Cypress City Tex., Siegel Sale 226; and 5) ms. "10" cancel, not tied, rimless town with ms. Nov. 12 (1864) date on cover to James C. McKnight, Palestine Tex., 1864 docketing, ex Ferrary.

Although the Dietz catalogue identifies this June 11 cover as the earliest known use in 1861, it is actually the second earliest use in 1864 -- the earliest cover is dated April 14, 1864, and bears a Small 10c on Yellow (ex Hind).

The inside address to the C.S.S. Sachem at Sabine Pass is the key to establishing this cover as an 1864 usage. The Sachem was one of two Federal gunboats captured by the Confederates at the famous Battle of Sabine Pass in September 1863. Sachem became part of the Texas Marine Department and served the Confederate army at Sabine Pass. In the spring of 1864, she was turned into a blockade runner under the command of John Davidson.

Ex Caspary and Weatherly (acquired privately by the Kilbournes)

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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2015-12-17
U.S. & C.S.A. Postal History
ogbl
Sale Number 1117, Lot Number 4512, Confederate States: General Issues, Scott 1-4 incl. Sheet of No. 15c Green, Stone 1 (1), 5c Green, Stone 1 (1)5c Green, Stone 1 (1). Complete left pane of 100 from the "Ackerman" sheet of 200, huge sheet margins all around, approximately 35 stamps with no gum or traces of gum, others have original gum, some stamps throughout the pane have minor thin spots, small sealed tears, small scuffs, horizontal creases or wrinkling, there are also a few nicks in sheet margin -- these are inconsequential flaws in a relic of this kind

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE ONLY SURVIVING PANE OF 100 OF CONFEDERATE STATES "NUMBER ONE". UNQUESTIONABLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ITEMS IN ALL OF UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

The 1929 edition of August Dietz's The Postal Service of The Confederate States of America (pp. 102-103) contains individual photographs of the left and right panes of the full sheet of 200 that at one time belonged to Sen. Ernest Ackerman. The Ackerman sheet was divided into two panes of 100, and the right pane was further divided into two blocks of 50 (5 vertical x 10 horizontal), each block representing the group of 50 subjects on the lithographic transfer stone that was repeated four times on the printing stone of 200. There is no record of another pane of 100 or larger multiple of the 1861 5c Green from Stones A-B, 1 or 2.

Bertram Poole used the Ackerman sheet as the basis for identifying characteristics of each of the 50 positions on the lithographic transfer stone (published in the Philatelic Gazette, October 1915). Contained in a manuscript supplementing Poole's descriptions is the following statement: "Poole's descriptions were taken from a full sheet of four panes ["pane" as used here refers to the transfer blocks of 50], (the only one known) which was then the property of Mr. Klemann, and which Mr. Ackerman purchased, and in whose collection it now is. Hence I call stamps from this stone 'ACKERMANS.'" The previous owners, the Hall family, acquired the pane of 100 as lot 211 in the Robert Laurence May 23, 1935, sale of Confederate material from the George Walcott collection (it realized $600 in the sale).

Ex Ackerman, Walcott and Hall.

E. 30,000-40,000
50,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 136, Pittsylvania Court House, Va.Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2), Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2)Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2). Large margins just touching tips of ornaments, intense shade and impression, natural vertical crease caused by gum, tied by bold "Pittsylvania C.H. Va. 9 Oct." (1861) circular datestamp on blue-lined folded cover (two flaps removed) to Secretary of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Richmond, neat "Ansd." docketing ties stamp, bottom edge of cover at left has minor sealed tear

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECTANGULAR-CUT EXAMPLE OF THE THREE RECORDED PITTSYLVANIA COURT HOUSE 5-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMPS ON LAID PAPER. ONE OF THE RAREST AND MOST OUTSTANDING OF ALL CONFEDERATE PROVISIONALS.

The description of the previous lot provides details of the ten Pittsylvania C.H. provisionals known on wove paper. Only three 5c stamps are recorded on laid paper. These are: 1) CR Ty. I, cover to Secretary of the Commonwealth, Oct. 9, offered here; 2) CS Ty. I, cover to Geo. Rives, Feb. 1862, Siegel 1983 Rarities sale; and 3) CS Ty. II, cover to Wm. T. Law, Dec. 20, Siegel 1982 Rarities sale. The date pattern does not indicate a specific time period for laid paper, and it is likely that the wove and laid papers were used interchangeably during the printing.

Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lilly and Gallagher

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Confederate States and Civil War-Related
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Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 135, Pittsylvania Court House, Va.Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Wove (66X1), Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Wove (66X1)Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Wove (66X1). Full margins just touching tips of ornaments, tied by bold "Pittsylvania C.H. Va. 27 Sep." (1861) circular datestamp on small cover to Lieut. R. W. Martin, "Chatham Grays", Williamsburg Va., small opening nick at lower left corner of cover

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THREE COVERS IN PRIVATE HANDS BEARING A RECTANGULAR-CUT EXAMPLE OF THE PITTSYLVANIA COURT HOUSE PROVISIONAL ON WOVE PAPER. ONLY TEN COPIES IN TOTAL ARE RECORDED, INCLUDING SEVEN COVERS.

The Scott and Dietz listings for the Pittsylvania C.H. provisional, as well as the Crown census, contain erroneous information, which is based on two fakes in the Ferrary collection (4th Sale, lots 75 and 76). The stamps on the two ex-Ferrary covers are counterfeits -- they both show a genuine characteristic, the space between "T" and "S" of "Cents", which is found on three genuine provisionals. However, both also show two typographic features that are not found on any of the genuine stamps and should not exist on any genuine impression. These are illustrated here in detail: A) on the counterfeit, the side points of the trefoil piece at left align with the tips of the curved line -- on the genuine stamps, the trefoil is set inside the curved line; and B) on the counterfeit, the bottom part of the second "O" in "Johnson" is broken off -- on the genuine stamp, the "O" is always complete. There are other minor differences, but these two features are sufficient to distinguish this type of counterfeit from the original. The 1929 Dietz book used the Ferrary counterfeit as its illustration of the 5c Pittsylvania C.H. provisional.

The Ferrary fakes include one rectangular-cut stamp on a cover and another on a Confederate patriotic cover. These should be removed from the record. The Scott and Dietz listings for the provisional used on patriotic cover, which does not genuinely exist, should be dropped. Our record of the remaining genuine examples includes the following (CR = cut rectangular; CS = cut to octagonal shape; Ty. I = No space between "T" and "S" of "Cents"; Ty. II = Gap between "T' and "S" of "Cents"): 1) CR Ty. I, previously uncancelled on a Nov. 11 cover to Mrs. Ruth Hairston, Cascade Va., steamed from cover with original gum intact on stamp, ex Deats (as a cover; photo in P.F. files), Caspary, Lilly; 2) CS Ty. II, tied on piece, Nov. 22 cds, ex Caspary; 3) CR Ty. I, cover to Miss Julia Green, Sep. 25, ex Hind, Caspary; 4) CR Ty. I, cover to Abram Fackler, Nov. 5, ex Caspary; 5) CR Ty. I, cover to Lt. R. W. Martin, Sep. 27, the cover offered here; 6) CS Ty. I, cover to John Payne, ex Hessel; 7) CS Ty. I, cover to Sue Henry, Jan. 20 (1862), ex Ferrary; 8) CS Ty. I, cover to Wm. Hunt, Nov. 4, ex Brooks, Klep; 9) CR Ty. I, cover to Clark & Holt, British Library, Tapling collection; and 10) CS Ty. II, tied on piece, Nov. 6, Siegel 1985 Rarities sale. In addition to the ten examples of the 5c on wove paper, there are three 5c provisionals recorded on laid paper (see following lot).

Ex Worthington and Caspary (where acquired by the Kilbournes)

20,000
50,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 35, Southern Letter Unpaid MailSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp and "DUE 3" straightline handstamp, both tying 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), creased at upper left and a few short perfs, matching "Louisville Ky. Jun. 30" (1861) double-circle datestamp on small cover addressed to Rev. John C. Tate in Bloomfield, Kentucky, manuscript "Milford Texas May 31" postmark (pen lines cancelling stamp)

EXTREMELY FINE. A SUPERB EXAMPLE OF THE "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" MARKING USED TO CANCEL THE UNITED STATES STAMP.

The U.S. May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north. With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp. Louisville started marking letters on June 25, but this first group did not have a datestamp. The subsequent group and all of those thereafter have the Louisville circular datestamp (June 27, 28 and 29 being the most common dates). As a matter of record, this is the only recorded "Southn. Letter Unpaid" cover with the June 30 datestamp.

United States postage stamps and stamped envelopes used from the South were regarded as contraband and were refused as prepayment. There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), of which only 13 have the 3c U.S. adhesive stamp used to pay the domestic rate. Two of the 13 are used with the New Orleans provisional (offered in this sale) and one is in the Smithsonian National Postal Museum, leaving only ten 3c 1857 Issue stamped covers with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking. This cover has a very early origin date -- May 31 -- and since it was mailed while the post office in Milford, Texas, was still technically as U.S. post office, there was no Confederate postage paid. Only two "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers with only U.S. postage are recorded, both dated May 31 from Texas (the other is in the Smithsonian National Postal Museum collection).

Special Routes Census No. SLU-17. Ex Caspary and Kilbourne.

E. 20,000-30,000
50,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2013-12-19
United States Postal History
c
Sale Number 1063, Lot Number 2208, Confederate Patriotics10c Rose (5), 10c Rose (5)10c Rose (5). Large margins, tied by "Camden Miss. Jun. 24" (1862) circular datestamp, second strike at left, on Hanging Lincoln Cartoon cover to "Mrs. Mary Burns, Oso, Texas", opened at left and rights, very small tear in cover at bottom left (almost invisible) stamp with some faint gum toning

VERY FINE. ONLY TWELVE EXAMPLES OF THE CELEBRATED HANGING LINCOLN ENVELOPE ARE RECORDED, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE STAMPED WITH THE 10-CENT ROSE LITHOGRAPH GENERAL ISSUE. ONE OF THE GREATEST CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUE COVERS.

The Hanging Lincoln design is widely recognized as the most distinctive of all Civil War patriotics. In this extraordinary cartoon, President Lincoln is hanging upside down from a tree limb, with his symbolic axe and fence rail tied around his neck. The caption reads "Abe Lincoln the destroyer. He once split Rails. Now he has split the Union." To the left and right is the caption "The penalty of disregarding the constitution. Impeached, deposed, Tried and convicted" (there is a spelling correction from "diposed" to "deposed"). Standing beside Lincoln is a mustachioed Winfield Scott, labeled "Old Fuss n Feathers", dropping his sword and exclaiming "My glory is gone for ever." On the ground is the Union flag, captioned "The stars and stripes lie in the dust, Never to rise." A star at left has the caption "The southern star is rising" and the Confederate 11-star flag towers above with the caption "The stars and bars shall for ever wave triumphant." Along the bottom is the imprint "Copyright claimed. HM & WC Box 417 Nashville Tenn." Despite continuing investigation, we have been unable to uncover the identify of the publishers "HM & WC."

According to a census by the late John R. Hill Jr. (updated with two new discoveries), there are twelve genuine Hanging Lincoln patriotics (listed in date order): 1) Jul. 25, 1861, Marshall Tex. Paid 10; 2) Aug. 21, 1861, Nashville Ten., two 5c provisionals, ex Kimmel, Myers, Rudy, D.K. (Siegel Sale 1022, lot 1066, realized $60,000); 3) Aug. 30, 1861, Athens La. "Paid X", ex Hall (Siegel Sale 840, lot 27, realized $13,000); 4) Nov. 2, 1861, Bowling Green Ky., ex Dr. Howard Green (Siegel Sale 822, lot 225, realized $28,000); 5) Jan. 1, 1862, Nashville Ten., 5c Olive Green (Siegel Sale 933, lot 978, realized $11,500) ; 6) Jan. 4, 1862, Nashville Ten., 5c Olive Green; 7) Feb. 20, 1862, Cumberland Gap Ten., ms. Paid 5, ex Boshwit (Siegel Sale 940, lot 462, realized $11,000); 8) Apr. 15, 1862, Cartersville Miss., ms. Due 5; 9) Apr. 15, 1862, Camden Miss., 10c Rose, to Mrs. Mary Bowers, Oso Tex., the cover offered here; 10) Jun. 24, 1862, Camden Miss., 10c Rose, to Mrs. Mary Bowers, Oso Tex., same correspondence as No. 9; 11) date unknown to JRH, West Union S.C., ms. Due 5; and 12) privately carried and not postally used. In addition, there is a genuine envelope with fake markings and a stamp added.

This cover has been privately held since its discovery and this is the first time it has been offered at auction.

E. 20,000-30,000
47,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1113, Pittsylvania Courth House, VirginiaPittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2), Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2)Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2). Well-balanced octagonal margins just into tips of ornaments, intense dark shade and impression, laid lines clearly visible in cross-lighting, tied by bold "Pittsylvania C.H. Va. 20 Dec." (1861) circular datestamp on brown cover to Wm. T. Law in Danville Va., most of backflap removed and small edge mend at upper left

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED PITTSYLVANIA COURT HOUSE 5-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMPS ON LAID PAPER, TWO OF WHICH HAVE OCTAGONAL MARGINS. ONE OF THE RAREST AND MOST OUTSTANDING OF ALL SOUTHERN POSTMASTERS' PROVISIONALS.

James P. Johnson was appointed U.S. postmaster of Pittsylvania Court House (known as Chatham today) by President James Buchanan on January 20, 1859. He was appointed C.S.A. postmaster on July 29, 1861 (Richard L. Calhoun, The Confederate Postmaster Provisionals of Virginia). During his term as postmaster Johnson issued a 5c Red provisional adhesive stamp bearing his name. The typeset design is nearly identical to the Danville typeset provisional, and Danville's postmaster, William D. Coleman, stated that his stamps were printed at the offices of the Democratic Appeal. For this reason philatelists assume that the same printer produced both postmasters' stamps, substituting one name for the other. The Pittsylvania Court House stamps were printed on wove and laid papers. Dangerous counterfeits on wove paper were made from type and borders that closely resemble the originals, and these are often counted in census work. The count of genuine examples currently (and correctly) stands at 10 on Wove (66X1) and 3 on Laid (66X2).

Ten Pittsylvania C.H. 5c provisionals are known on wove paper, but only three are recorded on laid paper (Scott 66X2). These are as follows: 1) Cut rectangular, Ty. I, cover to Secretary of the Commonwealth, Oct. 9, ex Worthington, Caspary, Lilly, Gallagher, Kilbourne and Gross; 2) Cut to shape, Ty. I, cover to Geo. Rives, Feb. 1862, Siegel 1983 Rarities sale; 3) Cut to shape, Ty. II, cover to Wm. T. Law, Dec. 20, the cover offered here.

The date pattern does not indicate a specific time period for laid paper, and it is likely that the wove and laid papers were used interchangeably during the printing.

Ex Hart, Dr. Graves, "Beverly Hills" and Dr. Green. With 2000 P.F. certificate

17,500
47,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2007-09-27
The Buck Boshwit Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 940, Lot Number 361, PostmasterRheatown Tenn., 5c Red (69X1), Rheatown Tenn., 5c Red (69X1)Rheatown Tenn., 5c Red (69X1). Position 2 in setting, Type II with distinctive inverted ornament at top right, full even margins, bright shade, neat ms. cancel, "Rheatown Ten. Apr. 9" circular datestamp on buff cover to Mrs. Reverend Wm. Brown, Central Presbyterian Office, Richmond Va., light vertical file fold well away from stamp

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FIVE RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE RHEATOWN POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL.

The 5c provisional stamps issued by Postmaster D. Pence were printed by the same printer who produced the Tellico Plains Tenn. provisional. The June dates recorded for the Rheatown suggest that it came first, and the postmaster's own recollections place the issue in "midsummer 1861" (see Crown book, p. 307). Although dated examples show usage into April 1862, a relatively long period of time, the issue is extremely rare.

The same basic type form containing three subjects was used for the Rheatown and Tellico Plains Tenn. provisionals. For the Rheatown, all three were 5c denominations. The inside border at the top of each stamp is made up of seven ornaments; the unique arrangement of the ornaments in each subject enables philatelists to identify the position of any stamp.

Our records contain at least a half-dozen off-cover examples the Rheatown 5c, including an unused pair, the only known multiple. The five covers and one dated piece we record are as follows (in chronological order, type identified): 1) Jun. 20 (1861), Ty. II, cover to Lt. D. R. Wilson, ex Kilbourne (Siegel Sale 815, lot 142, realized $15,000 hammer); 2) Jun. 30 (1861), Ty. I, small cover, faint address, Siegel 1984 Rarities sale; 3) Feb. 8 (1862), Ty. III, lady's embossed cover to Eliz. Devault, the only tied example, ex Caspary, Gallagher; 4) Feb. 13 (1862), Ty. II, on piece (upper half of cover), ex Steves, Crown book; 5) Feb. 15 (1862), Ty. I, cover to David Cleage, cds struck twice, ex Caspary; and 6) Apr. 9 (1862), Ty. II, cover to Mrs. Wm. Brown, ex MacBride, Freeland, Siegel 1982 Rarities sale, the cover offered here.

Ex MacBride and Freeland

15,000
47,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-06-24
The Brandon Collection, Part 1: Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1073, Lot Number 253, Gonzales Tex. thru Laurens C.H. S.C.Gonzales Tex., (10c) Gold on Black (30X3), Gonzales Tex., (10c) Gold on Black (30X3)Gonzales Tex., (10c) Gold on Black (30X3). Full to large margins except top right corner torn (masked by black background applied underneath), cancelled by two pen strokes, one ties the stamp, blue "Gonzales Tex. Apr. 1?" double-circle datestamp with matching "Paid" straightline on buff cover to Mr. A. I. Clark at Galveston Tex., directed to "Company B. Cook's Regiment. in care of Captain Riley", 1865 pencil receipt docketing, original enclosure datelined "Gonzalez Texas, March 28, 1865", cover with faults including sealed tear and small patched hole at bottom, stamp with light wrinkling

FINE APPEARANCE AND EXTREMELY RARE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS WITH THE 10-CENT GONZALES PROVISIONAL ON BLACK PAPER.

John B. Law, the Gonzales postmaster during the war, was a partner in the Colman & Law firm, booksellers and druggists who produced the colorful book labels adopted by Postmaster Law as provisional stamps in 1861 and 1864-65. In later years, some Colman & Law labels were removed from books and placed on covers to create fake provisional uses. As a result of this nefarious activity, collector understanding of the Gonzales Provisionals has at times been distorted.

The Colman & Law book labels on colored glazed paper have no denomination. Examples are divided into 5c and 10c stamps based on the rate to which they apply and the color of paper. The 1861 5c Gold on Dark Blue or Black is listed by Scott as 30X1. The 10c-rate-period stamps are listed as 30X2 -- Gold on Garnet, and 30X3 -- Gold on Black, the example offered here.

For 10c covers in the 1864-65 period, our records, combined with the Deaton census in The Great Texas Stamp Collection contain three covers with the Gold on Garnet. Two were in the Caspary sale: lot 137, 10c Gold on Crimson (Garnet), tied by pen strokes with the Gonzales circular datestamp and "Paid", dated July 14, 1864; and lot 138, 10c Gold on Garnet, dated Nov. 1, 1864 (Siegel Kilbourne Sale, 815, lot 45). The third bears a 10c Gold on Garnet to E. St. P. Bellinger, Hobby's Rgt., Galveston Tex., which is illustrated in the Deaton book.

For 10c covers bearing the Gold on Black, our records and the Deaton census contain only two. The cover offered here, dated April 1865 to Galveston, and an additional cover to Richmond Va. with a pen-tied stamp. An example affixed over a 3c U.S. entire has been questioned by specialists and is not included as genuine in the Deaton census.

Ex Hessel.

E. 20,000-30,000
47,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 149, Tellico Plains, Tenn.Tellico Plains Tenn., 5c Red (81X1), Tellico Plains Tenn., 5c Red (81X1)Tellico Plains Tenn., 5c Red (81X1). Clear to large margins except at upper right where just touching frameline, tied by customary "Decr 10/61" manuscript postmark on orange-buff cover addressed to William G. McAdoo, Clerk of Confederate Court, Knoxville Tenn., flap partly removed and trimmed along top edge of cover, couple bleached specks and light vertical fold, fresh and attractive

VERY FINE STAMP AND THE ONLY RECORDED COVER WITH THE TELLICO PLAINS PROVISIONAL

One other used Tellico Plains provisional, also a 5c, is recorded and illustrated in the Crown book (p. 337). It, too, bears a manuscript cancel, dated December 12th. In our opinion the cancel and address are from the same hand and pen; the court address indicates possible official usage of the adhesive.

Ex Ferrary, Hind, Emerson, Brooks and Everett (our Sale 754, where it realized $30,000 hammer)

32,500
47,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1116, Spartanburg, South CarolinaSpartanburg S.C., 5c Black (78X1), Spartanburg S.C., 5c Black (78X1)Spartanburg S.C., 5c Black (78X1). Cut circular as usual, tied by clearly struck "Paid" cancel, "Spartanburg S.C. Sep. 16, 1861" double-circle datestamp on red and blue 7-Star Confederate Flag Patriotic cover to Mrs. S. F. Patterson at Patterson S.C., sender's route directive "Via Charlotte"

VERY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF A SPARTANBURG POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ON A PATRIOTIC COVER. A SPECTACULAR ITEM IN IMMACULATE CONDITION.

John A. Lee was a prominent merchant who served as postmaster of Spartanburg from 1850 through the end of the war. Residents of Spartanburg remembered him as the "Wartime Postmaster" (John B. O. Landrum, History of Spartanburg County, available at Google Books -- thanks to Vince King for this citation).

Postmaster Lee created his provisional stamps by applying the "5" numeral rate marking inside the "Spartanburg S.C." double-circle datestamp on a sheet of paper. The stamps are known cut square and cut to shape. As one might imagine, the stamps come on a variety of papers. Two types of "5" markings were used, and one example is known with the denomination omitted. The paper and numeral varieties are listed separately in the Dietz and Scott catalogues.

Ex Ferrary and Clapp. From our 1964 Rarities sale. With 2004 P.F. certificate

30,000
45,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1035, Livingston, AlabamaLivingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1), Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1)Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1). Large margins, beautiful rich color and fine impression, neatly tied by "Livingston Ala. Dec. 10" (1861) circular datestamp on buff cover to Mrs. Ann E. Taylor, Enterprise Miss., stamp has tiny tear at bottom right, stain removed from top center of cover and a few other minor cosmetic improvements

EXTREMELY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF ONLY SEVEN RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE LIVINGSTON PROVISIONAL, A STRIKING PICTORIAL STAMP THAT DEPICTS THE SOUTHERN SHIELD AND ALLEGORICAL FIGURES.

Livingston is the county seat of Sumter County, Alabama, lying on the Selma and Meriden Railroad line about 130 miles north of Mobile, near the state's western border. Official records name Stephen W. Murley as the Livingston postmaster in 1861. Although other sources attribute the stamp to another postmaster, Robert F. Houston, it seems almost certain that Murley was solely responsible for the Livingston provisional. According to research by Van Koppersmith, "Houston served as postmaster at Livingston on at least three different occasions for a total of about twenty years beginning in the late 1830's. He was also a member of the state legislature in 1839 and again in 1857-1858, about the time he began and ended his terms as postmaster. Stephen W. Murley had taken over as postmaster at Livingston well before secession and remained to become the first Confederate postmaster, serving at least until the end of 1861. A thorough search of state, county and city history books yielded very little information on either postmaster. It is interesting to note that an S. W. Murley served as the postmaster in Selma, Dallas County, for a few years around 1840. However, further research showed that his first name was Samuel." The Livingston provisional is known used in November-December 1861 and again in March 1862, coincidental with Murley's term as postmaster.

The Livingston stamps were printed from a lithographic stone. Lithography was used by only three postmasters to print provisional stamps (Charleston, Livingston and Mobile). Every transfer on the stone has a small partly-complete circle (or curl) extending into the margin below the "T" of "Cents" at bottom. The allegorical design depicting images of the South is very unusual. Only two Confederate post offices, Livingston and Mobile, issued stamps with a figurative design specifically created for stamps (the Danville postmaster used a stock image for his provisional envelopes). It is almost certain that the same printer was responsible for both the Livingston and Mobile stamps, whose imprint "W. R. Robertson Mobile" appears on the Mobile lithographic stones. The size and layout of the Livingston stone has yet to be determined, and probably never will, due to the small number of surviving copies.

Our records contain a total of 11 stamps, including the famous and unique pair on cover (Nov. 12, 1861), 6 singles on separate covers (1861--Nov. 15, Nov. 15, Nov. 25, Dec. 10; 1862--Mar. 17 and Mar. 21), and 3 off-cover stamps. One of the single frankings, a corner-margin stamp (Nov. 25 date, ex Caspary, Antrim and Cole), was severely damaged when someone attempted to remove ballpoint pen ink with an eraser.

This cover was first offered at auction in 1892 as part of the Kleine collection, where it realized $780. Also ex Sellers, Duveen, Emerson, Brooks, Weatherly, "Isleham" (Peyton) and Hill

60,000
45,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
 
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 93, Petersburg Va. To Victoria Tex.Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green, Type II, Slanting “10” (88X3), Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green, Type II, Slanting “10” (88X3)Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green, Type II, Slanting “10” (88X3). Margins clear to touching frame, clear impression on deep green paper, cancelled by part of Victoria Tex. circular datestamp at lower right, tiny bit of an additional cancel at left center edge

VERY FINE. ONE OF FOUR RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE VICTORIA 10-CENT TYPE II POSTMASTER’S PROVISIONAL, ALL OF WHICH ARE OFF COVER, INCLUDING TWO UNUSED STAMPS. THIS IS BY FAR THE FINER OF THE TWO USED EXAMPLES, AND IT IS ONE OF TWO SOUND COPIES EXTANT.

We record four examples of the Victoria 10c Type II (bold slanting numerals):

1) Unused, small thin, ex Ferrary, Hind, Brooks, Moody and Kilbourne

2) Unused, sound, Siegel 1968 Rarities sale

3) Used, part of circular datestamp at lower right, ex Sotheby Parke Bernet sale, Apr. 15, 1979, “Camina” (Castillejo) and Dr. Maffeo, the stamp offered here

4) Used, part of datestamp with “Oct” month, extensively repaired across lower right, ex Caspary

The only other used example of the Victoria 10c Type II provisional is the ex- Caspary stamp, which is heavily repaired. The only other sound stamp is the unused copy listed as number 2 above.

Illustrated in Crown book (page 357). Ex “Camina” (Castillejo) and Dr. Maffeo. With 1994 P.F. certificate. Scott Value as unused (unpriced as used)

27,500
45,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
og
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 92, Petersburg Va. To Victoria Tex.Victoria Tex., 5c Red Brown on Green (88X1), Victoria Tex., 5c Red Brown on Green (88X1)Victoria Tex., 5c Red Brown on Green (88X1). Original gum, huge margins at top and right -- presumably from the corner of the sheet or setting -- ample at left and bottom, clear impression on bright green paper

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. BY FAR THE FINEST OF THE FIVE RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE VICTORIA 5-CENT POSTMASTER’S PROVISIONAL.

The five recorded examples of the 5c Victoria provisional are all unused and off cover, as follows:

1) Sound with original gum, top right corner margins, ex Ferrary, Hind, Hall and D.K. collection, the stamp offered here

2) Described as having original gum, top left corner margins, ex Hessel (“small faults”)

3) Described as having “some original gum”, top right corner margins, vertical crease, ex Caspary, Lilly and Kilbourne

4) Uncancelled, left sheet margin, torn into design at bottom, Albert Steves photo

5) Unused, no gum, bottom right corner margins, light chipping and natural paper bubble, from a recent find, ex Felton (Siegel Sale 1016, lot 645)

No cancelled Victoria 5c stamps or on-cover examples are known. Of the five recorded stamps, the example offered here is by far the finest.

Ex Ferrary (with his purple trefoil handstamp on back), Hind, Hall and D.K. collection. With 2000 P.F. certificate.

17,500
45,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 43, Goliad, TexasGoliad Tex., 5c Black on Rose (29X3), Goliad Tex., 5c Black on Rose (29X3)Goliad Tex., 5c Black on Rose (29X3). Signed "Clarke PM" in bright magenta ink, neatly cancelled by "Paid" straightline, matching "Goliad Tex." rimless circular town handstamp (without date) on blue cover front to Clement R. Johns, Comptroller, Austin City, Texas, part of the letter is on back and there is a pencil June 21, 1862, date notation, the stamp has margins all around including three huge margins, slight creasing at top

EXTREMELY FINE. ONLY SEVEN GOLIAD 5-CENT TYPE I PROVISIONAL STAMPS ARE KNOWN, INCLUDING ONE ON COVER IN THE BRITISH LIBRARY COLLECTION. THIS COVER-FRONT IS THE ONLY TYPE I USAGE AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS AND THE FINEST OF THE SIX KNOWN STAMPS IN PRIVATE HANDS. ONE OF THE GREATEST OF ALL CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL RARITIES AND A HIGHLIGHT OF THE KILBOURNE COLLECTION.

Our records of Goliad provisionals contain seven 5c Type I stamps and four 10c Type I stamps. The Type I setting, without the postmaster's name, was used prior to the Type II setting, to which Postmaster J. A. Clarke's was added. All but one of the eleven recorded 5c and 10c Type I provisionals bear the postmaster's manuscript signature in either black or red ink. The stamps were printed on a variety of papers, classified as White, Gray and Rose, and some stamps have a blue ink wash that appears to have been applied to the sheets. The Gray paper is very thin and pelure-like. The Rose paper is thicker than the Gray.

The variable paper and signature color create even greater rarities -- only two or three of any 5c variety is recorded, with some allowance for inaccurate classification in previous sale catalogues. More significant than the paper or signature differences is the current census showing only three Type I provisional usages: the 5c cover-front offered here, a 5c cover in the British Library's Tapling collection, and the 10c patriotic cover from the Caspary and Lilly collections. This cover-front is the only one of the three with a Goliad postmark -- the other two are uncancelled and have no town marking -- and it is the only 5c Type I usage available to collectors. Equally significant is the stamp's standing as the finest known example of this provisional rarity.

Illustrated in the color plate of the H. R. Harmer Caspary Sale 3 catalogue and in Ter Braake's Texas: The Drama of Its Postal Past (p. 142). Ex Ferrary, Caspary (realized $1,300 in 1956) and Lilly (where acquired by the Kilbournes in 1967, realized $3,600). Scott Retail of $8,000.00 for a cover is based on no sale event since 1967 -- the more common Goliad 10c Type II cover realized $67,500 hammer in our Sale 810

E. 20,000-30,000
45,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 1, Southern Letter Unpaid“Louisville Ky. Jun. ?” (1861), “Louisville Ky. Jun. ?” (1861)“Louisville Ky. Jun. ?” (1861). double-circle datestamp and “DUE 3” straightline handstamp on Griffin Female College blue illustrated cameo corner card cover to Prof. Anton G. Methfessel at New York City street address, “Griffin Ga. Jun. 9” (1861) circular datestamp, “PAID” and “5” handstamps, manuscript “Due 3” for U.S. postage and pencil “4c” due for postage and 1c New York City carrier fee for delivery to street address

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED “SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID” COVERS WITH A CORNER CARD OF ANY KIND -- THIS IS THE ONLY ILLUSTRATED BUILDING CORNER CARD. ONE OF THE MOST SPECTACULAR OF ALL CIVIL WAR ERA COVERS.

The last regular mail run between Nashville and Louisville was on June 12. On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this arrangement.

Louisville Postmaster J. J. Speed created the “Southn. Letter Unpaid” marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. There are 29 “Southn. Letter Unpaid” covers recorded in the Special Routes book. This is the only cover with a cameo corner card.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-3. Illustrated in Dietz and American Stampless Cover Catalogue. Ex Haas and Ballard. With 2009 P.F. certificate.

E. 20,000-30,000
45,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1028, Greenville, AlabamaGreenville Ala., 5c Red & Blue on Pinkish Glazed (33X1), Greenville Ala., 5c Red & Blue on Pinkish Glazed (33X1)Greenville Ala., 5c Red & Blue on Pinkish Glazed (33X1). Typical margins with borders and type almost complete, strong impressions and rich colors on bright fresh paper, uncancelled as always, "Greenville Ala. Oct. 19" (1861) circular datestamp on yellow cover addressed to "George L. Henry Esqr., Care of Capt. H. B. T. Montgomery, 5th Georgia Regiment, Pensacola, Fla.", vertical folds in cover away from stamp, slight wear

VERY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE 5-CENT GREENVILLE PROVISIONAL STAMP -- FOUR OTHER EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN OFF COVER. THE STAMP ON THIS COVER IS COMPLETELY SOUND AND HAS RICH COLORS. A MAGNIFICENT COVER BEARING ONE OF THE FIRST BI-COLORED POSTAGE STAMPS TO APPEAR IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE. AN OUTSTANDING RARITY OF CLASSIC AMERICAN PHILATELY.

The Greenville provisionals were issued by Judge Benjamin F. Porter (1808-1868). His papers are located at Auburn University Libraries and a biography of Porter from the library website provides details of his life (http://www.lib.auburn.edu/archive/find-aid/155.htm ): "Benjamin Faneuil Porter was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1808. His father died while he was very young, which left his family financially troubled. His educational background was limited, having left school at an early age to support his mother and sister. He initially worked as a druggist in Charleston and attempted to study medicine. Porter however changed his mind and began to study law. In 1826 was admitted to the South Carolina Bar and soon afterwards began to practice law in Charleston. Three years later, in 1829, Porter and his new wife relocated to Claiborne, Alabama. He was granted a license to practice law in Alabama in 1830. In 1832 he was elected to the State Legislature from Monroe County. Two years later he was elected as County Judge. He and his family moved to Tuscaloosa, Alabama in 1835. Returning to politics he was re-elected to the State Legislature in 1837 and elected Circuit Court Judge in 1839. He was the first chair of the University of Alabama School of Law in 1845 but resigned within the year. Prior to the American Civil War he edited a newspaper; served as Reporter to the Alabama State Supreme Court; was the Superintendent of Education; was the President of Will's Valley Railroad; and ran for State Senate but was defeated. At the outbreak of the war, he offered his services to Jefferson Davis and was appointed to command a camp of instruction at Greenville, Alabama. Following the war, Porter joined the Republican Party and accepted the Judgeship of the 12th Judicial Circuit. He died on June 4, 1868 in Greenville, Butler County, Alabama."

Postmaster Porter's typeset provisional issue is not only very rare, it is remarkable as one of three postmaster issues printed in two colors -- the others were issued at Baton Rouge and Lenoir. These are the first government-issued, bi-colored adhesive postage stamps to appear anywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

After a thorough search of relevant records (auction sales, Levi clippings, Philatelic Foundation and Confederate Stamp Alliance certificates) we have located only eight examples of either Greenville denomination, including four off-cover 5c stamps, two 5c covers, and two 10c covers. None of the Greenville stamps is cancelled.

This cover was included in the Ferrary sale as part of a mixed lot of doubtful items, which included a few Greenville provisionals (Gilbert Sale 4, lot 4). The lot was purchased by Edward Stern of the Economist Stamp Co., and two of the 5c Greenville stamps were pronounced genuine: one off cover and the stamp on the cover offered here, which was sold to Alfred H. Caspary.

Ex Ferrary, Caspary, Dr. Graves and Birkinbine

40,000
42,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-06-24
The Brandon Collection, Part 1: Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1073, Lot Number 212, Aberdeen Miss. thru Columbia Tenn.Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1), Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1)Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1). Calhoun Type C, ample margins to touched, bright shade, neatly tied by “Baton Rouge La. Aug. 5, 1861” circular datestamp on cover to G. W. Dearing Esq. with printed "Baton Rouge, La." address, early in its life the cover was folded and small bit of lower right corner of stamp adheres to opposite side of cover -- causing thinning and tiny loss of design in one ornament in that area of the stamp but corner still intact, outline of stamp visible at left, two other file folds, tears mostly confined to back

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE EARLIEST USE AMONG ONLY SIX RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE BATON ROUGE 2-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP. A GREAT RARITY.

Of No. 11X1, we record three unused, five used off cover or on piece and five used on covers, for a total of 13 stamps. Of Scott No. 11X1a (“McCcrmick” error) we record three examples, including one unused stamp, one used off cover, and one used on cover. The 2c covers, in order of date, are as follows:

Scott 11X1, 11X1a

1) Type C, tied by Baton Rouge Aug. 5, 1861 circular datestamp on pre-printed locally addressed cover to G. W. Dearing, ex Hiram E. Deats and Hessel, the example offered here

2) Type D, tied by Baton Rouge Sep. 27, 1861 circular datestamp, addressed locally to Jno. P. Behrnes, ex Caspary, Lightner, Lilly, Kilbourne, Gross, Sharrer (Siegel Sale 1035, lot 12, realized $62,500)

3) "McCcrmick" error (11X1a), Pos. 7, Baton Rouge Nov. 30, 1861 circular datestamp on cover to Robert W. Boyd Esq. in New Orleans, ex Caspary, Lilly, Dr. Graves and D.K. collection (Siegel Sale 1022, lot 1008)

4) Tied by Baton Rouge circular datestamp (listed as Jan. 1 in Calhoun pamphlet) on cover to Administrator of the Estate of R. B. McGimpsey, P.F. certificate states rebacked cover front but we are confident it is the original back which has been reattached to the cleaned and restored cover, ex Emerson, Haas and Hill (Siegel Sale 896, lot 732)

5) Tied by Baton Rouge May 19 circular datestamp on soldier's local cover to Mrs. C.D. DeRussey, faults and showing effects of fire, Siegel 1964 and 1985 Rarities Sales

6) Tied by "Paid" straightline on pre-printed locally addressed cover, date unknown, ex Caspary and Muzzy

Ex Hiram E. Deats and Hessel

27,500
42,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-06-26
2014 Rarities of the World
c
Sale Number 1075, Lot Number 1224, Confederate StatesBeaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1), Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1)Beaumont Tex., 10c Black on Yellow (12X1). Position with "Beaumont" showing broken "T" and no period or comma after name, large margins to just touched at bottom right corner, tied by "Beaumont Tex" circular town handstamp with "June 11" (1864) date in manuscript (touches and ties edge of stamp), "Paid" straightline handstamp on adversity cover made from Confederate naval form, addressed to Mrs. Mary P. Watson at San Augustine Tex., manuscript "OB" (official Business) endorsement crossed out, the cover was turned and addressed back to "C. S. Watson, C.S. Str. Sachem, Sabine Pass, Texas", "San Augustine Tex. Jun. 20" (1864) circular datestamp, "Paid" and "10" handstamps, right side reduced but not affecting stamp, bottom right corner clipped, paper has been added to edge to improve appearance, small erosion spot in "W" of address

A VERY FINE BEAUMONT 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ON YELLOW PAPER -- ONE OF FIVE KNOWN EXAMPLES OF THIS RARITY -- USED ON A TURNED ADVERSITY COVER FROM A MEMBER OF THE TEXAS MARINE BRIGADE ABOARD THE C.S.S. SACHEM. THIS IS THE ONLY COVER KNOWN WITH THE BEAUMONT PROVISIONAL TIED BY THE TOWN MARKING.

According to Jim Wheat's Postmasters & Post Offices of Texas, 1846-1930, the following men served as postmaster of Beaumont, Texas, from 1860 to 1866: John J. Herring, appointed Aug. 17, 1860 (resigned); Wilson A. Junker, Aug 5., 1861 (CSA) (resigned); P. H. Glaze, Nov. 12, 1861 (CSA); Rev. Alexander Hinkle, Dec. 5, 1863 (CSA); Thomas Snow, Feb. 22, 1865 (CSA); John J. Herring, Apr. 6, 1866; and George L. Ewing, Jul. 19, 1866.

Since all recorded examples of the Beaumont provisional stamps are dated in 1864, they were probably issued by Reverend Alexander Hinkle, a Methodist pastor who settled in Beaumont around this time and was appointed as postmaster on December 5, 1863.

The stamps were typeset and printed from three different settings: one printed on Pink paper (Scott 12X2), and two on Yellow paper (12X1 and 12X3). A setting of four subjects (two by two) has been reconstructed from the Pink singles (there are no recorded multiples). Each subject has a different arrangement of long and short frame pieces. The printings on Yellow paper were made from two entirely different settings: one slightly smaller than the Pink stamps, and the other much taller with the words "Texas" and "Postage" added to the design.

Only 21 of any kind are recorded, including the unique Large 10c on Yellow (on cover), five of the Small 10c on Yellow (each on cover), and 15 of the Small 10c on Pink (12 covers, 3 off cover). Most of the recorded covers are faulty, and only four have postmarks of any kind tying the stamps; this is the only cover known with the handstamped marking tying the provisional. The others are tied by manuscript.

The five Small 10c Yellow covers we record are as follows:

1) manuscript "X" cancel, not tied, manuscript Apr. 9, 1864 date, to Mary J. Watson, San Augustine Tex., ex Hind and Hall (Siegel Sale 823, lot 397)

2) tied by rimless town with manuscript Jun. 11 (1864) date on turned cover to Mary J. Watson, San Augustine Tex., ex Caspary, Weatherly, Kilbourne, the cover offered here

3) uncancelled, used on turned cover to Mrs. Wm. B. Duncan, Liberty Tex., ex Caspary, Lilly

4) manuscript "X" cancel, not tied, used on cover to Cypress City Tex., Siegel Sale 226

5) manuscript "10" cancel, not tied, rimless town with manuscript Nov. 12 (1864) date on cover to James C. McKnight, Palestine Tex., 1864 docketing, ex Ferrary.

The inside address to the C.S.S. Sachem at Sabine Pass is the key to establishing this cover as an 1864 usage. The Sachem was one of two Federal gunboats captured by the Confederates at the famous Battle of Sabine Pass in September 1863. Sachem became part of the Texas Marine Department and served the Confederate army at Sabine Pass. In the spring of 1864, she was turned into a blockade runner under the command of John Davidson.

Ex Caspary, Weatherly and Kilbourne

55,000
40,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1025, Goliad, TexasGoliad Tex., 5c Black on Rose (29X3), Goliad Tex., 5c Black on Rose (29X3)Goliad Tex., 5c Black on Rose (29X3). Signed "Clarke PM" in bright magenta ink, neatly cancelled by "PAID" straightline, matching "Goliad Tex." rimless circular town handstamp (without date) on blue cover front to Clement R. Johns, Comptroller, Austin City, Texas, part of the letter is on back and there is a pencil June 21, 1862, date notation, the stamp has margins all around including three huge margins, slight creasing at top

EXTREMELY FINE. ONLY EIGHT GOLIAD 5-CENT TYPE I PROVISIONAL STAMPS ARE KNOWN, INCLUDING ONE ON COVER IN THE BRITISH LIBRARY COLLECTION. THIS COVER-FRONT IS THE ONLY TYPE I "COVER" AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS AND THE FINEST OF THE SEVEN KNOWN STAMPS IN PRIVATE HANDS. ONE OF THE GREATEST OF ALL CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL RARITIES.

The Confederate postmaster of Goliad was John (Jno.) A. Clarke, whose name was signed by hand on stamps of the first provisional issue and set in type as part of the setting for the second issue. Clarke also served as Secretary to the Board of Trustees of the Paine Female Institute, which later became Goliad College. Clarke signed an oath of allegiance after the war on January 9, 1866 (an image of the document is available at www.fold3.com ).

August Dietz reported that the Goliad provisional stamps and the similar stamps of Helena, Texas, were printed at the offices of the Goliad Messenger. The editor of this newspaper was Reverend Alexander F. Cox (his middle initial was incorrectly stated as "M." by Dietz). The publisher was R. W. Peirce. The November 12, 1864, edition of the Goliad Messenger is available on-line at http://texashistory.unt.edu . Reverend Cox died on April 5, 1897, and his obituary appeared in the Weekly Picayune (April 9, 1897).

The Goliad provisionals were printed from typeset forms in denominations of 5c and 10c. The Type I setting, without Clarke's name, was used to print stamps issued prior to the Type II setting, probably in 1861 and 1862. The Type II setting was probably made in 1863.

Clement R. Johns was the Texas comptroller from 1859 to 1864. The June 21, 1862, date notation provides crucial evidence that the Goliad Type I setting (without postmaster's name) preceded the Type II setting. This cover-front is the only one of the three Type I uses with a Goliad postmark -- the other two are uncancelled and have no town marking -- and it is the only 5c Type I "cover" available to collectors. Equally significant is the stamp's standing as the finest known example of this provisional rarity.

Illustrated in the color plate of the H. R. Harmer Caspary Sale 3 catalogue and in Ter Braake's Texas: The Drama of Its Postal Past (p. 142).

Ex Ferrary (with his small purple trefoil handstamp at bottom right), Caspary, Lilly, Kilbourne and Gross. With 2010 P.F. certificate.

History of the Goliad provisionals: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/pdf/GoliadTX.pdf

Census of Goliad provisionals: http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/29X1-29X9/29X1-29X9.pdf

47,500
40,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-06-24
The Brandon Collection, Part 1: Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1073, Lot Number 250, Courtland Ala. thru Goliad Tex.Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7). Type II with Clark's name printed at left, mostly ample to clear margins, ornaments just touched at top and upper right, strong impression on distinctive blue-gray paper, tied by "PAID" straightline on lady's cover -- a small high-quality envelope made of wavy-line watermarked paper -- to Stonewall Tex., with original letter enclosed, datelined "Goliad, Oct. 21st, 1863", invisibly sealed opening tear along top edge at upper left corner

EXTREMELY FINE. THE EARLIEST DATED EXAMPLE OF A GOLIAD TYPE II PROVISIONAL AND ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FOUR 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS.

The Confederate postmaster of Goliad was John (Jno.) A. Clarke, whose name was signed by hand on stamps of the first provisional issue and set in type as part of the setting for the second issue. Clarke also served as Secretary to the Board of Trustees of the Paine Female Institute, which later became Goliad College. Clarke signed an oath of allegiance after the war on January 9, 1866 (an image of the document is available at www.fold3.com).

August Dietz reported that the Goliad provisional stamps and the similar stamps of Helena, Texas, were printed at the offices of the Goliad Messenger. The editor of this newspaper was Reverend Alexander F. Cox (his middle initial was incorrectly stated as "M." by Dietz). The publisher was R. W. Peirce. The November 12, 1864, edition of the Goliad Messenger is available on-line at http://texashistory.unt.edu . Reverend Cox died on April 5, 1897, and his obituary appeared in the Weekly Picayune (April 9, 1897).

The Goliad provisionals were printed from typeset forms in denominations of 5c and 10c. The Type I setting, without Clarke's name, was used to print stamps issued prior to the Type II setting, probably in 1861 and 1862. The Type II setting was probably made in 1863.

Of the eight normal Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library, which leaves four covers available to collectors. Only three of the four covers have stamps tied by the town datestamp or "Paid" straightline. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are two other covers with the Type II "GOILAD" spelling error. This cover with its original October 21, 1863, letter is the earliest recorded date for any Goliad Type II provisional. The Type I provisionals (without the postmaster's name) were probably issued in 1861 or 1862. The Type II setting with "J. A. Clarke" and "Post Master" added to each typeset stamp was probably put to press in 1863.

Ex Hessel, Haas, Hill, and D.K. collection. With 1998 P.F. certificate.

History of the Goliad provisionals: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/pdf/GoliadTX.pdf

Census of Goliad provisionals: http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/29X1-29X9/29X1-29X9.pdf

25,000
40,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 144, Spartanburg, S.C.Spartanburg S.C., 5c Black (78X1), Spartanburg S.C., 5c Black (78X1)Spartanburg S.C., 5c Black (78X1). Cut circular with huge margins all around, tied by "Paid" straightline, "Spartanburg S.C." double-circle datestamp with ms. "June 24" (1861) date on orange-buff cover to Corp. Edw. J. Dean, Spartan Rifles, 5th Regt. S.C. Vol., Col. M. Jenkins, Commanding, Richmond Va., care of Capt. Jos. Walker, sender's instructions on backflap "The Honorable Post Master of Richmond Va. will win the gratitude of many of the daughters of South Carolina by his kindness in promptly forwarding letters to the volunteers who have left their homes to defend Virginia." couple minor edge tears, stamp very slightly creased in margin at right

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE APPROXIMATELY TWENTY KNOWN COVERS BEARING THE SPARTANBURG POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL.

Most of the recorded Spartanburg Type I provisionals (thin numeral at center) are cut in a circular shape. Some varieties exist, including Scott 78X1a (value omitted). Only one pair is known, used on a cover from the Dean correspondence.

Corporal Edward J. Dean and the Dean correspondence were the subjects of an article by the late Daniel M. Gilbert, published in The Confederate Philatelist (No. 235, p. 28). We have record of an 1899 letter to N. P. Strauss of Henderson N.C., which identifies him as the original purchaser and the Dean family as the source of the correspondence.

Ex Caspary

17,500
40,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1986-05-25
The Isleham Collection of United States Stamps
c
Sale Number 662, Lot Number 1384, Confederate StatesUniontown, Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5), Uniontown, Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5)Uniontown, Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5). Large Mar gins including Top Sheet Margin, Fresh Colors, neatly tied by Uniontown, Ala. pmk. on Remarkably Fresh Homemade Cover to Va., minor cover file fold, Extraordinarily Fine Quality for this Rarity, ex-Ferrari, signed W.H.C. (Colson)

20,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1114, Pleasant Shade, VirginiaPleasant Shade Va., 5c Blue (67X1), Pleasant Shade Va., 5c Blue (67X1)Pleasant Shade Va., 5c Blue (67X1). Position 1, top left corner sheet margins and large margins all around, faint gum toning, tied by clearly-struck greenish-blue "Pleasant Shade Va. Apr. 14" (1862) circular datestamp on grayish-manila homemade cover to Petersburg Va., from the Donnan correspondence (from which the unique pair on cover originates), neat receipt docketing, cover slightly torn upon opening at upper right corner, but the stamp is unaffected

EXTREMELY FINE STAMP AND ATTRACTIVELY TIED ON COVER. ONE OF THE FINEST RECORDED USED EXAMPLES OF THE PLEASANT SHADE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL AND ONE OF THREE COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS (TWO WITH SINGLES).

The tiny town of Pleasant Shade had a population of 57 in 1860. Robert E. Davis was appointed U.S. postmaster by President James Buchanan on January 11, 1860. He was appointed C.S.A. postmaster on July 27, 1861, and was replaced by Eugene W. Spratley on July 14, 1863 (Richard L. Calhoun, The Confederate Postmaster Provisionals of Virginia).

Postmaster Davis had his provisional stamps printed at Andrew F. Crutchfield & Company, publisher of the local Petersburg newspaper, The Daily Express. This was the firm that printed the nearly identical Petersburg provisionals (see page 172). Crutchfield & Co. used five of the settings from the Petersburg form, substituting the names of the post office and postmaster, and printing the Pleasant Shade stamps in Blue instead of Red.

The Calhoun census, which accords with our own, records a total of 22 stamps, including an unused block of six, an unused vertical pair, seven unused singles, a used single off cover, a used single on piece, three singles on covers and one pair on cover. Details of the covers are provided in the description of lot 1114. The block and pair were reported by George B. Sloane to have been discovered in 1900 (Sloane's Column, Stamps, Nov. 26, 1955).

There are four recorded covers with the Pleasant Shade provisional: 1) Nov. 24 (1861), horizontal pair, to Messr. A. & J. M. Donnan, Petersburg Va., the earliest recorded use and only recorded used multiple, ex Burger Brothers, Duveen, Worthington, Hind, Emerson, Caspary, Lightner, Dr. Graves; 2) Dec. 22 (1861), to Miss Rose Casier, Staunton Va., Tapling collection, British Library; 3) Apr. 14 (1862), to Alexander Donnan, Petersburg Va., ex Caspary, Kilbourne and Gross, the cover offered here; and 4) May 21 (1862), to Miss Ella B. Smith, Christiansville Va., ex Ferrary and Caspary Ex Caspary, Kilbourne and Gross.

With 2010 P.F. certificate

27,500
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-06-24
The Brandon Collection, Part 1: Postmasters' Provisionals
 
Sale Number 1073, Lot Number 260, Gonzales Tex. thru Laurens C.H. S.C.Helena Tex., 10c Black on Buff (38X2), Helena Tex., 10c Black on Buff (38X2)Helena Tex., 10c Black on Buff (38X2). Large to full margins, clear impression, blue manuscript initials cancel, margin repair at upper right and thinned

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED 10-CENT HELENA, TEXAS, POSTMASTER’S PROVISIONAL STAMPS. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

There are five recorded examples of the provisional stamps issued by Helena postmaster, David W. Dailey, including three 5c and two 10c, all off cover. The two 10c stamps are as follows:

1) Four margins, blue manuscript cancel, small margin repair and thinned, ex Caspary and Kirkman, the stamp offered here

2) Four margins, light cancel, closed tear and thinned, ex Caspary

#The initials on this stamp (shown below) are not those of Postmaster David W. Dailey. They appear to be "E.F.M." or "E.F.W."

Illustrated in Deaton’s The Great Texas Stamp Collection (Plate 8). Ex Caspary and Kirkman.

Scott Catalogue states “Used examples are valued with small faults or repairs, as all recorded have faults”

10,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 143, Salem, Va.Salem Va. (Liberty Va.), 5c Black, Laid Paper (74X1), Salem Va. (Liberty Va.), 5c Black, Laid Paper (74X1)Salem Va. (Liberty Va.), 5c Black, Laid Paper (74X1). Large margins, uncancelled as always, mostly clear "Salem Va. Dec. 6" (1861) circular datestamp on orange-buff cover to Jno. F. Baugh, Cashier, Lynchburg Va., sender's endorsement "Ex. B" and ms. "Paid 5" at upper right

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED COVER SHOWING USE OF THE LIBERTY 5-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP FROM SALEM, VIRGINIA. ONLY TWO OTHER EXAMPLES OF THIS RARITY ARE KNOWN, BOTH USED FROM LIBERTY.

The simple typeset provisional stamps known on covers from Liberty (Jul. 7 and Jul. 10 -- see lot 55) and Salem (Dec. 6) are identical and were evidently made by impressing printer's type by hand onto a sheet of paper. Salem, home to Roanoke College, had an active post office during the Confederate period. Liberty was located east of Salem on the Norfolk & Western Railroad line between Lynchburg and Salem. The use of the same stamp at two post offices seems to us to be linked to railway activity. Two other stampless Liberty covers are known, one of which had a coin attached to pay postage. It is likely that the provisional stamps were available briefly to persons who sent their letters to the Liberty (or Salem) offices from outlying areas, as a means to indicate prepayment in the absence of coins or government stamps.

Ex Worthington, Caspary and Lilly (where acquired by the Kilbournes)

E. 10,000-15,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2000-04-12
The Howard P. Green Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 822, Lot Number 110, Postmasters Provisionals (Petersburg to Uniontown)Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2), Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2)Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Laid (66X2). Well-balanced octagonal margins just into tips of ornaments, intense dark shade and impression, laid lines clearly visible in cross-lighting, tied by bold "Pittsylvania C.H. Va. 20 Dec." (1861) circular datestamp on brown cover to Wm. T. Law in Danville Va., most of backflap removed and small edge mend at upper left

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED PITTSYLVANIA COURT HOUSE 5-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMPS ON LAID PAPER, TWO OF WHICH HAVE OCTAGONAL MARGINS. ONE OF THE RAREST AND MOST OUTSTANDING OF ALL CONFEDERATE PROVISIONALS.

Ten Pittsylvania C.H. 5c provisionals are known on wove paper, but only three are recorded on laid paper (Scott 66X2). These are: 1) Cut rectangular, Ty. I, cover to Secretary of the Commonwealth, Oct. 9, ex Worthington, Caspary, Lilly, Gallagher and Kilbourne; 2) Cut to shape, Ty. I, cover to Geo. Rives, Feb. 1862, Siegel 1983 Rarities sale; and 3) Cut to shape, Ty. II, cover to Wm. T. Law, Dec. 20, Siegel 1982 Rarities sale, the cover offered here. The date pattern does not indicate a specific time period for laid paper, and it is likely that the wove and laid papers were used interchangeably during the printing.

Ex Hart, Freeland and "Beverly Hills" collection. The 66X2 (cut rectangular) cover in the Kilbourne collection realized $50,000 hammer in our recent sale.

15,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 76, Memphis, Tenn.Memphis Tenn., 5c Red (56X2), Memphis Tenn., 5c Red (56X2)Memphis Tenn., 5c Red (56X2). Partly cut to shape at upper right, other sides clear to slightly in, tied by "Memphis Ten. Jul. 15(?), 1861" circular datestamp on North-to-South thru-the-lines cover, addressed to Greenwood Tenn., clear strikes of "The Adams Express Co. Boston Jul. 6" circular datestamp and "Paid J.W.R." double-circle with ms. "25", the Paid marking applied at Boston to indicate prepayment of 25c express charge, vertical fold and slight wear at upper left corner

VERY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF ANY CONFEDERATE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ON AN ADAMS EXPRESS COVER FROM BOSTON.

Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with thru-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive). To the best of our knowledge, this is the only Memphis thru-the-lines express usage, and it is the only provisional/express usage from the Adams Boston office (whose markings are rare in their own right).

E. 7,500-10,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-02-26
The Benjamin Wishnietsky Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 1064, Lot Number 57, Postmasters` Provisionals: Galveston Tex. thru Montgomery Ala.Galveston Tex., 10c Black entire (98XU2), Galveston Tex., 10c Black entire (98XU2)Galveston Tex., 10c Black entire (98XU2). Perfect detailed strike of ornately-framed “PAID” handstamp depicting flowers, anchors and lyre, tying United States 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), separate “10” numeral handstamp struck over U.S. stamp, “Galveston Tex. Jun. 4, 1860” double-circle datestamp (yeardate in error, should be 1861) on northbound cover to Miss Fannie M. Fletcher in Granville O., marked "30th"" in correspondence, fresh and clean

EXTREMELY FINE AND IMMACULATE. ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING CONFEDERATE POSTMASTER PROVISIONAL COVERS AND A HIGHLIGHT OF THE WISHNIETSKY COLLECTION. THIS IS THE ONLY EXAMPLE OF THE GALVESTON HANDSTAMPED PROVISIONAL USED WITH A UNITED STATES STAMP.

U.S. Postmaster General Montgomery Blair ordered the suspension of mail service in the seceded states, effective May 31, 1861, but northbound mail was allowed to enter until June 7, when all mail exchange between the North and South was banned. This cover was posted at Galveston on June 4, 1861 -- the 1860 year in the datestamp is in error, which is consistent with other Galveston postmarks of the period. It reached the exchange office (either in western Tennessee or at Nashville) before northbound mail forwarding was completely discontinued. The cover was franked with the 3c 1857 Issue to pay the U.S. rate. The Galveston Provisional paid the over-500 miles C.S.A. rate from Texas, which was effective June 1.

Ex Hollowbush. Accompanied by a photocopy of another cover from the same correspondence ("27th") without the Galveston provisional markings. With 1973 P.F. certificate

E. 7,500-10,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
 
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 28, Galveston Tex. To Helena Tex.Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7). Large margins except at bottom right where well clear of ornaments, lightly cancelled by “PAID” straightline, tiny corner crease almost entirely in margin at upper right

EXTREMELY FINE. ONLY EIGHT 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD PROVISIONAL STAMPS ARE RECORDED, INCLUDING THREE OFF COVER. THIS AND THE EX-CASPARY STAMP ARE THE TWO FINEST EXAMPLES OFF COVER.

Of the eight normal Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are three of the Type II “GOILAD” spelling error (two on covers).

This stamp is illustrated in the Scott Catalogue Goliad listings. Ex Ferrary (with his small purple trefoil backstamp), Hind and Hall. With 2000 P.F. certificate.

12,000
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
 
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 13, Baton Rouge La.Baton Rouge La., 2c Green, “McCcrmick” Error (11X1a), Baton Rouge La., 2c Green, “McCcrmick” Error (11X1a)Baton Rouge La., 2c Green, “McCcrmick” Error (11X1a). Position 7 according to Richard L. Calhoun’s plating studies, manuscript “X” cancel, clear margins just touching a few ornaments, few thin spots and pinholes do not affect appearance

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE BATON ROUGE 2-CENT “McCCRMICK” ERROR, OF WHICH THIS STAMP IS THE ONLY ONE CANCELLED OFF COVER. A MAJOR RARITY OF CONFEDERATE POSTMASTERS’ PROVISIONALS.

Our records contain three examples of the 2c “McCcrmick” error:

1) Unused, ex Worthington, Col. Green and D.K. collection

2) Manuscript “X” cancel, ex Ferrary and Hessel, the stamp offered here

3) Tied by Nov. 30, 1861 datestamp on cover to New Orleans, ex Caspary, Lilly, Graves and D.K. collection

Ex Ferrary and Hessel. With 1976 P.F. certificate

32,500
37,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2004-09-29
The Blake M. Myers Collection
c
Sale Number 882, Lot Number 2001, Southern Letter UnpaidSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Blue two-line handstamp with matching "Louisville Ky. Jun. 27" double-circle datestamp on 3c Red Star Die entire to Hautes Pyrennes, France, "Bayou Chene La. Jun. 8" (1861) circular datestamp, "New York 3 Jul. 11" debit datestamp also cancels entire, ms. "Paid 15" crossed out by blue grids, bold "8" decimes due, transit and receiving backstamps

VERY FINE. AN ESPECIALLY CLEAR STRIKE OF THE "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" HANDSTAMP OF LOUISVILLE. ONE OF ONLY FIVE REPORTED TO FOREIGN DESTINATIONS.

Steven C. Walske's recently published analysis of mail service at the onset of the Civil War provides new information about circumstances surrounding the use of the coveted "Southern Letter Unpaid" marking. Postmaster General Blair's May 27 suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mails to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north. With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12, "Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. This held mail later became the well-known 'Southern Letter Unpaid' mail" (Walske).

United States postage stamps affixed in the South (and entires used from the South) were regarded as contraband and were refused as prepayment. On June 24, Dr. J. J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southern Letter Unpaid" handstamp.

Immediately after receiving instructions from Washington to forward the held mail, the Louisville post office began marking letters. Some of these have circular datestamps (June 27, 28 and 29 being the most common dates), while others have no Louisville datestamp.

The foreign-bound "Southern Letter Unpaid" covers are as follows: 1) Louisville June 27, from St. Francisville La. to Prussia; 2) Louisville June 27, from Bayou Chene La. to France (the cover offered here) 3) Louisville June 27, from New Orleans to France; 4) no Louisville datestamp, from New Orleans to France; and 5) Louisville Jul. 11, from Petersburg Va. to England.

Ex Wunsch

E. 40,000-50,000
35,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1112, Pittsylvania Courth House, VirginiaPittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Wove (66X1), Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Wove (66X1)Pittsylvania Court House Va., 5c Dull Red on Wove (66X1). Full rectangular margins just touching tips of ornaments, tied by lightly struck "Pittsylvania C.H. Va. Sep. 25" (1861) circular datestamp on small yellow cover to Miss Julia Green in Danville Va., backflap removed and very slight reduction at top, stamp with small corner crease ending in tiny tear at bottom left, light toning

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THREE COVERS IN PRIVATE HANDS BEARING A RECTANGULAR-CUT EXAMPLE OF THE PITTSYLVANIA COURT HOUSE PROVISIONAL ON WOVE PAPER. ONLY TEN COPIES IN TOTAL ARE RECORDED, INCLUDING SEVEN COVERS. THIS IS THE EARLIEST KNOWN USE.

James P. Johnson was appointed U.S. postmaster of Pittsylvania Court House (known as Chatham today) by President James Buchanan on January 20, 1859. He was appointed C.S.A. postmaster on July 29, 1861 (Richard L. Calhoun, The Confederate Postmaster Provisionals of Virginia). During his term as postmaster Johnson issued a 5c Red provisional adhesive stamp bearing his name. The typeset design is nearly identical to the Danville typeset provisional, and Danville's postmaster, William D. Coleman, stated that his stamps were printed at the offices of the Democratic Appeal. For this reason philatelists assume that the same printer produced both postmasters' stamps, substituting one name for the other. The Pittsylvania Court House stamps were printed on wove and laid papers. Dangerous counterfeits on wove paper were made from type and borders that closely resemble the originals, and these are often counted in census work. The count of genuine examples currently (and correctly) stands at 10 on Wove (66X1) and 3 on Laid (66X2).

Our records of the Pittsylvania Court House 66X1 provisional include the following: CR = cut rectangular; CS = cut to octagonal shape; Ty. I = No space between "T" and "S" of "Cents" Ty. II = Gap between "T' and "S" of "Cents"; 1) CR Ty. I, previously uncancelled on a Nov. 11 cover to Mrs. Ruth Hairston, Cascade Va., steamed from cover with original gum intact on stamp, ex Deats (as a cover; photo in P.F. files), Caspary, Lilly; 2) CS Ty. II, tied on piece, Nov. 22 circular datestamp, ex Caspary; 3) CR Ty. I, cover to Miss Julia Green, Sep. 25, ex Sanford, Duveen, Hind, Clapp, Moody and Hall, the cover offered here; 4) CR Ty. I, cover to Abram Fackler, Nov. 5, ex Caspary; 5) CR Ty. I, cover to Lt. R. W. Martin, Sep. 27, ex Kilbourne (Siegel Sale 815, lot 135) and Gross; 6) CS Ty. I, cover to John Payne, ex Hessel; 7) CS Ty. I, cover to Sue Henry, Jan. 20 (1862), ex Ferrary ; 8) CS Ty. I, cover to Wm. Hunt, Nov. 4, ex Brooks, Klep ; 9) CR Ty. I, cover to Clark & Holt, British Library, Tapling collection ; 10) CS Ty. II, tied on piece, Nov. 6, Siegel 1985 Rarities sale.

Ex Sanford (mentioned in a Feb. 5, 1893, New York Times article about the sale), Duveen, Hind, Clapp, Moody and Hall. With 2002 P.F. certificate

45,000
35,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1026, Goliad, TexasGoliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7). Mostly ample to clear margins, ornaments just touched at top and upper right, strong impression on distinctive blue-gray paper, tied by "Paid" straightline on lady's cover -- a small high-quality envelope made of wavy-line watermarked paper -- to Stonewall Tex., with original letter enclosed, datelined "Goliad, Oct. 21st, 1863", invisibly sealed opening tear along top edge at upper left corner

EXTREMELY FINE. THE EARLIEST DATED EXAMPLE OF A GOLIAD TYPE II PROVISIONAL AND ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FOUR 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS.

The Confederate postmaster of Goliad was John (Jno.) A. Clarke, whose name was signed by hand on stamps of the first provisional issue and set in type as part of the setting for the second issue. Clarke also served as Secretary to the Board of Trustees of the Paine Female Institute, which later became Goliad College. Clarke signed an oath of allegiance after the war on January 9, 1866 (an image of the document is available at www.fold3.com ).

August Dietz reported that the Goliad provisional stamps and the similar stamps of Helena, Texas, were printed at the offices of the Goliad Messenger. The editor of this newspaper was Reverend Alexander F. Cox (his middle initial was incorrectly stated as "M." by Dietz). The publisher was R. W. Peirce. The November 12, 1864, edition of the Goliad Messenger is available on-line at http://texashistory.unt.edu . Reverend Cox died on April 5, 1897, and his obituary appeared in the Weekly Picayune (April 9, 1897).

The Goliad provisionals were printed from typeset forms in denominations of 5c and 10c. The Type I setting, without Clarke's name, was used to print stamps issued prior to the Type II setting, probably in 1861 and 1862. The Type II setting was probably made in 1863.

Of the eight normal Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library, which leaves four covers available to collectors. Only three of the four covers have stamps tied by the town datestamp or "Paid" straightline. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are two other covers with the Type II "GOILAD" spelling error. This cover with its original October 21, 1863, letter is the earliest recorded date for any Goliad Type II provisional. The Type I provisionals (without the postmaster's name) were probably issued in 1861 or 1862. The Type II setting with "J. A. Clarke" and "Post Master" added to each typeset stamp was probably put to press in 1863.

Ex Hessel and Hill. This cover was acquired by D.K. in our Sale 810 in 1999 for $67,500 hammer versus the then-current Scott value of $7,500.00. With 1998 P.F. certificate.

History of the Goliad provisionals: http://siegelauctions.com/enc/pdf/GoliadTX.pdf

Census of Goliad provisionals: http://www.siegelauctions.com/dynamic/census/29X1-29X9/29X1-29X9.pdf

25,000
35,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1997-10-28
Confederate States
c
Sale Number 795, Lot Number 484, Postmasters ProvisionalsUniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5), Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5)Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5). Position 1, large even margins all around, rich color on deeply blued paper, well tied by "Uniontown Ala. Sep. 22" (1861) circular datestamp on cover to Port Royal Va., small sealed opening tears in right edge not affecting stamp

EXTREMELY FINE STAMP AND A FRESH ATTRACTIVE COVER. ONLY EIGHT EXAMPLES OF THE UNIONTOWN POSTMASTER'S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ARE RECORDED, OF WHICH FIVE ARE SOUND STAMPS ON COVER.

Postmaster P. N. Booker was responsible for issuing the 2c, 5c and 10c provisional stamps at Uniontown, Alabama. One typeset form of four subjects was used for the three denominations. The numeral in parentheses between the "PA" and "ID" of "PAID" was changed for each value, and different color ink was used - Dark Blue (2c), Green (5c) and Red (10c). All three values were printed on gray blue paper - probably used for the first printing - and the 2c and 5c are also known on white paper, which was probably used for subsequent printings. The 10c has not been found on white paper.

Eight examples of the 10c Red are known to us. These are (in order of plate position): 1) Pos. 1 on cover to Maria L. Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Kimmel, Haas, Birkinbine (the cover offered here); 2) Pos. 1 on cover to John D. Pitts, Richmond Va., ex Ferrary, Caspary and Isleham, 3) Pos. 2 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., illustrated in 1986 Dietz, p. 16, 4) Pos. 2 on cover to Maria Louisa Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Meroni 5) Pos. 2 repaired stamp on repaired cover to Mrs. John B. Carey 6) Pos. 3, corner crease, small tear, on lady's embossed cover to Mr. Richmond Christian, Richmond Va., ex Hind, 7) Pos. 4 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Sweet, Muzzy, and 8) Pos. 4 uncancelled on large piece with part of addressee's name "S. Price", Virginia destination, ex Caspary. The Scott Catalogue prices the 10c as an off-cover stamp, both unused and used, but we have not been successful in locating any off-cover examples other than the ex-Caspary piece.

Very few post offices east of the Mississippi River issued and used 10c adhesive (A) or press-printed (E) provisionals. This small group is as follows: Baton Rouge La. (A - three known); Charleston S.C. (E - unique, see lot 330); Danville Va. (E - probably not used); Fincastle Va. (E - unique); Fredericksburg Va. (A - never used); Greenville Ala. (A - three known); Greenwood Depot Va. (A - six known); Knoxville Tenn. (A - unique; and E - rare used); Marion Va. (A - six known on cover); Nashville Tenn. (A - seven known on cover); Tellico Plains Tenn. (A - never used); and Uniontown Ala. (A - eight known). All other 10c provisionals were used in Texas or were issued as handstamped entires.

Ex Kimmel and Haas. Scott Retail $22,500.00 (despite the sale of another Extremely Fine cover in our 1986 Isleham sale for $41,250)

E. 30,000-40,000
35,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 376, Trans-Rio Grande Mail: Brownsville-Matamoros20c Green, Diagonal Half Used as 10c (13c), 20c Green, Diagonal Half Used as 10c (13c)20c Green, Diagonal Half Used as 10c (13c). Matching upper left and lower right diagonal halves of the same stamp, each tied on separate folded letters written in German from the same commercial firm in Monterrey (Mexico) to pharmacist August Forcke in New Braunfels Tex.; the upper left bisect with huge top sheet margin and large left margin, tied by "Brownsville Tex. Dec. 5" (1864) rimless circular datestamp on letter datelined "Monterey [crossed out] Matamoros, Dec. 2, '64", address with "via San Antonio" route designation, carried across the river between Matamoros and Brownsville and then by the Confederate mails to New Braunfels; the lower right bisect tied by "San Antonio Tex. Dec. 16" circular datestamp on letter datelined "Matamoros Nov. 29 64", carried further up the Rio Grande where it crossed from Nuevo Laredo to Laredo, then entered the Confederate mails at San Antonio

EXTREMELY FINE. A UNIQUE AND REMARKABLE PAIR OF COVERS, BEARING MATCHING HALVES OF THE SAME CONFEDERATE STATES 20-CENT GENERAL ISSUE STAMP ON SEPARATE LETTERS THAT WERE CARRIED ACROSS THE RIO GRANDE FROM MEXICO TO TEXAS VIA DIFFERENT ROUTES. THIS IS THE ONLY MATCHING PAIR OF 20-CENT BISECTS EXTANT, AND THE POSTAL HISTORY ASPECT OF THE PAIR ADDS EVEN GREATER SIGNIFICANCE.

Information about the addressee can be found at http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org/Herzstein_Library: "A practicing pharmacist in New Braunfels, Texas, for 50 years, Johann August Forcke was born in Hildsheim, Germany, on April 20, 1814, and studied pharmacy in Jena, Germany, before immigrating to Texas in 1845. He landed at Indianola and arrived in New Braunfels in 1846. An early settler of the city, Forcke served as one of the first city aldermen from June 7, 1847 to March 3, 1849. Forcke bought property in 1851 on South Seguin Street where he located his drug store. His business closed in 1898. August Forke married Johanne Sophia Fricke (1816 – 1898) in 1847. The couple had five children. He died January 2, 1903, and is buried in the Comal Cemetery in New Braunfels, Texas." Among the Forcke papers at San Jacinto Museum is an invoice from S. Ramos y Hermano of Monterrey, Mexico, dated August 19, 1863, that documents the necessity for Texans to turn to Mexico to import drugs during the Civil War.

Ex Caspary, where acquired by the Weills, presumably for Reverend Paul Freeland. Raymond Weill's personal copy of the Caspary catalogue (in our library) notes "Must" next to each lot, meaning "Must Have". Also from our 1982 Rarities of the World sale (realized $22,000 hammer) and 1986 Rarities of the World sale (realized $25,000 hammer), and ex McCarren.

Illustrated in Special Routes (p. 160). Each cover with 1982 and 2005 P.F. certificates and a letter from P.F. Chairman Mortimer L. Neinken dated November 8 1982, stating that the bisects are both halves of the same stamp.

E. 20,000-30,000
35,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2014-06-24
The Brandon Collection, Part 1: Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1073, Lot Number 256, Gonzales Tex. thru Laurens C.H. S.C.Greenville Ala., 10c Red & Blue on Pinkish Glazed (33X2), Greenville Ala., 10c Red & Blue on Pinkish Glazed (33X2)Greenville Ala., 10c Red & Blue on Pinkish Glazed (33X2). Inverted "r" in "Greenville", full margins with borders and type essentially complete though more lightly printed at top, uncancelled, "Greenville Ala. Mar. 20" (1862) circular datestamp on blue-lined cover addressed to "D. B. Taylor, Care of Capt. E. A. Perry, Pensacola Rangers, Florida Vol., Richmond Va.", small repaired nick at top of cover and missing backflap, stamp with minor gum soak at top

VERY FINE. ONE OF ONLY TWO RECORDED EXAMPLES OF THE 10-CENT GREENVILLE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- BOTH ARE ON COVERS FROM THE SAME CORRESPONDENCE. ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING CONFEDERATE RARITIES AND A HIGHLIGHT OF THE BRANDON COLLECTION.

The Greenville provisionals were issued by Judge Benjamin F. Porter (1808-1868). His papers are located at Auburn University Libraries and a biography of Porter from the library website provides details of his life (http://www.lib.auburn.edu/archive/find-aid/155.htm ): "Benjamin Faneuil Porter was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1808. His father died while he was very young, which left his family financially troubled. His educational background was limited, having left school at an early age to support his mother and sister. He initially worked as a druggist in Charleston and attempted to study medicine. Porter however changed his mind and began to study law. In 1826 was admitted to the South Carolina Bar and soon afterwards began to practice law in Charleston. Three years later, in 1829, Porter and his new wife relocated to Claiborne, Alabama. He was granted a license to practice law in Alabama in 1830. In 1832 he was elected to the State Legislature from Monroe County. Two years later he was elected as County Judge. He and his family moved to Tuscaloosa, Alabama in 1835. Returning to politics he was re-elected to the State Legislature in 1837 and elected Circuit Court Judge in 1839. He was the first chair of the University of Alabama School of Law in 1845 but resigned within the year. Prior to the American Civil War he edited a newspaper; served as Reporter to the Alabama State Supreme Court; was the Superintendent of Education; was the President of Will's Valley Railroad; and ran for State Senate but was defeated. At the outbreak of the war, he offered his services to Jefferson Davis and was appointed to command a camp of instruction at Greenville, Alabama. Following the war, Porter joined the Republican Party and accepted the Judgeship of the 12th Judicial Circuit. He died on June 4, 1868 in Greenville, Butler County, Alabama."

Postmaster Porter's typeset provisional issues are not only very rare, they are remarkable as one of three postmaster issues printed in two colors -- the others were issued at Baton Rouge and Lenoir. These are the first government-issued, bi-colored adhesive postage stamps to appear anywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

There are only two recorded examples of the Greenville 10c, both with the inverted "r" and both on covers addressed to D. B. Taylor of the Pensacola Rangers at Richmond. The other cover, ex Ferrary, is dated in October 1861. The addressee was an enlisted soldier in Company A (Escambia County) of the Pensacola Rifle Rangers, which was led by Captain (later Brigadier General and Florida Governor) Edward A. Perry. Company A was mustered into service on May 25, 1861 and served in the Virginia Theater of operations as part of the 2nd Florida Infantry, seeing action at Yorktown, Seven Pines, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and the Wilderness.

Ex Seebeck (with his guarantee on back), Caspary, Lilly and from our 1970 Rarities sale. Illustrated in Philatelic Gazette (April 1913). Raymond H. Weill backstamp

47,500
35,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 155, Uniontown, Ala.Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5), Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5)Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5). Position 2, large margins except at lower left where clear, intense shade on deeply blued paper, well-tied by usual blurry "Uniontown Ala." (1861) circular datestamp on yellow cover to Maria Louisa Kidd, Port Royal Va., slightly reduced at top and tiny mended nick at upper right clear of stamp

VERY FINE STAMP AND A FRESH ATTRACTIVE COVER. ONLY EIGHT EXAMPLES OF THE UNIONTOWN POSTMASTER'S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ARE RECORDED, OF WHICH FIVE ARE SOUND STAMPS ON COVER.

Postmaster P. N. Booker was responsible for issuing the 2c, 5c and 10c provisional stamps at Uniontown, Alabama. One typeset form of four subjects was used for the three denominations. The numeral in parentheses between the "PA" and "ID" of "PAID" was changed for each value, and different color ink was used - Dark Blue (2c), Green (5c) and Red (10c). All three values were printed on gray blue paper - probably used for the first printing -- and the 2c and 5c are also known on white paper, which was probably used for subsequent printings. The 10c has not been found on white paper.

Eight examples of the 10c Red are known to us. These are (in order of plate position): 1) Pos. 1 on Sep. 22 (1861) cover to Maria L. Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Kimmel, Haas, Birkinbine (our Sale 795, realized $32,500 hammer); 2) Pos. 1 on Jun. 9 (1862) cover to John D. Pitts, Richmond Va., ex Ferrary, Caspary and Isleham; 3) Pos. 2 on Apr. 21 (1862) cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., illustrated in 1986 Dietz, p. 16,; 4) Pos. 2 on undated cover to Maria Louisa Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Brooks and Meroni, the cover offered here; 5) Pos. 2 repaired stamp on undated repaired cover to Mrs. John B. Carey; 6) Pos. 3, corner crease, small tear, on Sep. 27 (1861) lady's embossed cover to Mr. Richmond Christian, Richmond Va., ex Hind; 7) Pos. 4 on Jul. 5 (1862) cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Sweet, Muzzy; and 8) Pos. 4 uncancelled on large piece dated Sep. 27 (1861) with part of addressee's name "S. Price", Virginia destination, ex Caspary. The Scott Catalogue prices the 10c as an off-cover stamp, both unused and used, but we have not been successful in locating any off-cover examples other than the ex-Caspary piece.

Very few post offices east of the Mississippi River issued and used 10c adhesive (A) or press-printed (E) provisionals. This small group is as follows: Baton Rouge La. (A - three known); Charleston S.C. (E - unique); Danville Va. (E - probably not used); Fincastle Va. (E - unique); Fredericksburg Va. (A - never used); Greenville Ala. (A - two known); Greenwood Depot Va. (A - six known); Knoxville Tenn. (A - unique; and E - rare used); Marion Va. (A - six known on cover); Nashville Tenn. (A - seven known on cover); Tellico Plains Tenn. (A - never used); and Uniontown Ala. (A - eight known). All other 10c provisionals were used in Texas or were issued as handstamped entires.

Illustrated in Ashbrook's article on the Brooks collection (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945). Ex Brooks (who discovered both Kidd covers in 1938) and Meroni.

32,500
35,000
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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, All Sale Dates thru 2017/03/30

21,748 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 290


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