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21,748 Selected Lots, Page 1 of 1,088

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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, All Sale Dates thru 2017/03/30
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Date
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Grade
Symbol
Photo/Description
Cat./Est. Value
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 93, Mount Lebanon, LouisianaMount Lebanon La., 5c Red Brown (60X1), Mount Lebanon La., 5c Red Brown (60X1)Mount Lebanon La., 5c Red Brown (60X1). Fine impression that shows all of the lettering and reveals the wood grain of the printing block, neatly cancelled with small pen stroke, affixed upside down on bright white cover to "Mr. D. Ripley, care Adol. Hamilton Esq., New Orleans, La." with printed corner card for "C. G. Thurmond, Dealer in Staples & Fancy Dry Goods, Hardware, Groceries, &c., &c., Mt. Lebanon, La.", stamp has huge margins cleanly cut at top and bottom and roughly separated at sides (causing a tiny tear), cover opened roughly at left, which effectively ties the stamp, a piece of backing paper affixed behind left edge of cover purely for cosmetic purposes

VERY FINE. THE FAMOUS AND UNIQUE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL OF MOUNT LEBANON, LOUISIANA. THIS REMARKABLE STAMP IS A MIRROR IMAGE OF THE INTENDED DESIGN, WHICH WAS CREATED BY HAMMERING PRINTER'S TYPE INTO A WOOD BLOCK. THE MOUNT LEBANON HAS BEEN DISPLAYED AMONG THE "ARISTOCTRATS OF PHILATELY" AT INTERPHIL '76, AMERIPEX '86 AND ANPHILEX '96, AND IT IS WIDELY REGARDED AS THE MOST VALUABLE STAMP IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

Mount Lebanon was settled in 1847 by immigrants from South Carolina. The village is located in Bienville Parish, which was established in 1848 and named for Jean Baptiste Sieur de Bienville, colonizer of Louisiana and founder of the city of New Orleans. It lies in northern Louisiana, approximately 400 miles distance from New Orleans. Mount Lebanon was the site of the first Baptist church in North Louisiana, and the Baptist Convention founded Mount Lebanon University in 1855. During the Civil War, the school was closed and turned into a hospital -- it moved to Pineville after the war and was re-named Louisiana College. [Reference: www:louisianahistory.ourfamily.com].

According to an account by L. B. Dabney, published in the Southern Philatelist (May 1929) and reprinted in the Crown book (p. 238), the Mount Lebanon postmaster during the war (1859-1865) was W. F. Wells, who was publisher of the Louisiana Baptist newspaper. According to citizens of Mount Lebanon who were interviewed by Dabney for his 1929 article, the provisional stamps were printed by Wells and used briefly in June 1861. Mount Lebanon had a wartime population of less than 1,000, and it is unlikely that the stamp saw widespread use.

Apart from its extreme rarity, the Mount Lebanon provisional stamp is believed to be the sole example of a mirror-image stamp in all of philately. The stamp was printed from a piece of wood with a relatively smooth surface. Lines were incised into the wood and strips were removed to create the borders surrounding each stamp. Horizontal and vertical ruled lines were added within the borders of each subject, and a circle was cut into the center. At this point the "engraver" took printer's type and hammered the letters spelling "Mt. Lebanon La." around the circle, and the numeral "5" was impressed into the center. The enlarged photo shown here in upright position clearly shows the effect of this process -- the printed stamp is a mirror image of the right-reading wood engraving. As anyone familiar with printing knows, the plate used to print an image must mirror the intended design. This principle of typography was missed or ignored by the creator of the Mount Lebanon provisional.

The single known example shows parts of three adjoining subjects at left, at the extreme bottom-left corner, and at bottom (see detail). There is additional printing to the right of the primary impression, which we think is a second impression. Judging from the size, shape and line breaks of this second impression, this might be the bottom of the woodblock, turned 90 degrees. Such work-and-turn printing is found on other provisionals (Memphis 5c, for example). All of this is purely hypothetical, and we encourage others to develop a better explanation.

The Mount Lebanon cover was part of the Ferrary collection sold at auction in Paris in 1925-1927. It next appeared in the Alfred H. Caspary sale held by H. R. Harmer in 1956, where A. Earl Weatherly acquired it for his collection. At the invitation of Weatherly in 1963, Charles and Lucy Kilbourne acquired a number of important provisional rarities by private sale. Thus, the famous Mount Lebanon cover appears at auction for the first time in 43 years. It has been shown in the Aristocrats of Philately display, alongside major philatelic rarities of the world, at Interphil 1976, Ameripex 1986 and Anphilex 1996.

Ex Ferrary, Caspary and Weatherly. Acquired by the Kilbournes from Weatherly in 1963.

100,000
350,000
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 29, Galveston Tex. To Helena Tex.Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Buff (29X7 var), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Buff (29X7 var)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Buff (29X7 var). Large even margins all around, tied by “PAID” straightline cancel, second strike to left, on brown cover to Susan F. Moody, Victoria Tex.--the wife of Victoria Postmaster James A. Moody--with original letter enclosure datelined “Goliad, August” (circa 1864), light pre-manufacturing fold in cover at left, small piece out of backflap from opening, these negligible flaws mentioned only to emphasize the exceptionally fine condition of this rare provisional cover

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FOUR 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS. THE STAMP IS PRINTED ON BUFF PAPER, NOT THE LISTED GRAY PAPER.

Of the eight normal Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library, which leaves four covers available to collectors. Only three of the four covers have stamps tied by the town datestamp or “Paid” straightline. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are two other covers with the Type II “GOILAD” spelling error.

The stamp on this cover is certified as the normal 29X7 on Gray paper, and it has always been described in accordance with the Scott listing. However, as the comparison photograph shows (below), this stamp and the Gray 29X7 stamp (lot 28) are on two different colored papers. This stamp is more accurately described as Buff. It is known that the Goliad Messenger newspaper office used whatever paper they could find, including salvaged paper from other print runs. Therefore, it is quite conceivable that papers of different colors were used for the Goliad printings.

This cover was acquired in 1988 by Charles W. Deaton from descendants of the Moody family. It is the last Goliad provisional to come to light..

Illustrated in Deaton’s The Great Texas Stamp Collection (plate 15). Ex “Camina” (Castillejo). With 1994 P.F. certificate as 10c Black on Gray 29X7.

40,000
110,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 156, Victoria, TexasVictoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2), Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2)Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2). Two huge margins, touched at right and bottom, tied by "Victoria Tex. Mar. 30" (1863) circular datestamp on blue folded letter to J. San Roman, Brownsville, Tex., contents regarding goods from Matamoros, Mexico, very faint toning

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE VICTORIA 10-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY FOUR EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN. THIS AND THE OTHER 10-CENT ARE THE ONLY RECORDED COVERS FOR ANY OF THE VICTORIA PROVISIONALS.

Our records contain four examples of the Victoria 10c Type I (large thin numerals): 1) Mar. 30, 1863 cover to J. San Roman, offered here, ex Brooks, Weatherly; 2) Jun. 23 (1863) cover to C. Hellenkamp, ex Caspary and Muzzy; 3) Unused stamp with small repair, ex Hessel; and 4) a severely damaged stamp with one third of lower right missing when discovered by A. Steves (P.F. photo files). The two covers bearing the 10c Type I are the only covers recorded for any of the Victoria provisionals. The ex-Caspary cover was acquired by John R. Boker Jr. in the 1967 Muzzy sale and has not since been offered publicly. This cover was acquired by Harold C. Brooks privately and sold to A. Earl Weatherly in another private transaction. The Kilbournes acquired the cover directly from Weatherly; therefore, it has never appeared at public auction. Considering that the last public transaction involving one of the two known Victoria provisional covers took place in 1967, the "current" Scott value of $17,500 should be weighed against more relevant market factors.

Illustrated in Ashbrook article on the Brooks collection (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945). Ex Brooks and Weatherly (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1963)

17,500
105,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1123, Victoria, TexasVictoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2), Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2)Victoria Tex., 10c Red Brown on Green (88X2). Two huge margins, touched at right and bottom, tied by "Victoria Tex. Mar. 30" (1863) circular datestamp on blue folded letter to J. San Roman, Brownsville, Tex., contents regarding goods from Matamoros, Mexico, very faint toning around edges of stamp

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE VICTORIA 10-CENT POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY FIVE EXAMPLES ARE KNOWN. THE TWO 10-CENT COVERS ARE THE ONLY RECORDED COVERS FOR ANY OF THE VICTORIA PROVISIONALS.

James A. Moody was appointed Victoria's U.S. postmaster on May 22, 1846. He was appointed C.S.A. postmaster on July 12, 1861, and served until he was replaced by a U.S. postmaster in April 1865 (this information from Vince King).

Moody issued 5c and 10c provisional stamps bearing his name. All of the stamps were printed from a typeset form on green paper. The 5c and 10c settings with large numerals are quite similar in composition. A second 10c setting with a small italic numeral "10" was also used. The only Victoria provisional covers known are both franked with a single 10c with large numeral, dated March 30 and June 23, 1863 (the cover offered here is the earlier of the two).

Our records contain five examples of the Victoria 10c Type I (large thin numerals): 1) Mar. 30, 1863 cover to J. San Roman, ex Brooks, Weatherly, Kilbourne and Gross, the cover offered here; 2) Jun. 23 (1863) cover to C. Hellenkamp, ex Caspary, Muzzy and Boker; 3) Unused stamp with small repair, ex Hessel; 4) A severely damaged stamp with one third of lower right missing when discovered by Albert Steves; and 5) Unused stamp with thin and horizontal crease ending in a small tear, from a recent find, ex Felton (Siegel Sale 1016, lot 646).

The two covers bearing the 10c Type I are the only covers recorded for any of the Victoria provisionals. The ex-Caspary cover was acquired by John R. Boker Jr. in the 1967 Muzzy sale and has not since been offered publicly. The cover offered here was acquired by Harold C. Brooks and sold to A. Earl Weatherly in another private transaction. Charles and Lucy Kilbourne acquired the cover directly from Weatherly in 1963. It was next sold in our 1999 Kilbourne sale and purchased by Charles and Tracy Shreve for William H. Gross for $105,000 (Siegel Sale 815, lot 156). D.K. acquired the cover in the 2009 Spink-Shreves sale of the Gross Confederate States collection for $95,000 hammer.

Illustrated in Ashbrook article on the Brooks collection (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945). Source notation "Nassau 1940" on back (believed to be Weatherly's). Ex Brooks, Weatherly, Kilbourne and Gross. With 2010 P.F. certificate

125,000
100,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 35, Jackson Miss. To Livingston Ala.Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1), Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1)Livingston Ala., 5c Blue (51X1). Full to huge margins showing part of adjoining stamp above, bottom right margin clears frameline, beautiful rich color, neatly tied by “Livingston Ala. Nov. 15” (1861) circular datestamp on light yellow cover to Mrs. M. A. Sturdivant, Hollow Square Ala., sender’s “Chg box 102” notation

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE FINEST SINGLE FRANKING AMONG THE SEVEN RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE LIVINGSTON PROVISIONAL -- A STRIKING PICTORIAL STAMP THAT DEPICTS THE SOUTHERN SHIELD AND ALLEGORICAL FIGURES. ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING OF ALL CONFEDERATE COVERS.

There are six single-franked covers, one of which is disfigured. The other four are attractive, but none equals this magnificent cover’s quality. Stanley B. Ashbrook described this item as “really a superb cover and the finest Livingston that I have ever seen.” (Stamp Specialist, Black Book, 1945)

This cover was purchased privately before World War II by Harold C. Brooks, and when the Brooks collection was dispersed, this Livingston (one of two owned by Brooks) was sold privately to A. Earl Weatherly. In 1963 Charles and Lucy Kilbourne purchased the cover directly from Weatherly. In the 1999 Kilbourne sale it was acquired by William H. Gross, and in the Shreves-Spink 2010 Gross sale it was bought by Mr. Sharrer’s agent.

Signed Ashbrook. Ex Brooks, Weatherly, Kilbourne and Gross

60,000
100,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1087, New Orleans, LouisianaNew Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3), New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3)New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with United States 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED, AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read; in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have a Southern Postmaster's Provisional stamps (both New Orleans). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-14. Illustrated in National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial book and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas, Ishikawa and Walske. With 2010 P.F. certificate

E. 75,000-100,000
90,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 104, Nashville, Tenn.Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6), Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6)Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6). Two huge margins, framelines touched at top and right, deep shade, scissors-cut at top left, tied by blue "Adams Express Co. Nashville Aug. 1" oval datestamp with matching "10" handstamp indicating Confederate postage rate on United States 3c Red Star Die entire to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth, Petersburg Va., "Adams Ex. Co. * Louisville, Ky. * Jul. 30, 1861" circular datestamp cancels 3c embossed stamp, small red ms. "2" express charge (two bits, or 25c), receipt docketing "Prof. Agnew & Sundry others", small part of backflap removed, light soiling and edge wear

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY COVERS WITH THE NASHVILLE 10-CENT PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE MIXED FRANKINGS WITH UNITED STATES POSTAGE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER THAT COMBINES THE RAREST ELEMENTS OF PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

As explained in the previous description, Adams Express Company was required to ensure the prepayment of government postage (Federal and Confederate), although the letter was carried outside the regular mails. Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with thru-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive).

Of the Nashville provisional/express covers, five are known with the 5c and three with the 10c; only two of the 10c covers are mixed frankings (the third is used alone). These two Nashville 10c mixed-franking covers carried by Adams, both North-to-South usages, are the only 10c adhesive Confederate provisionals known in combination with United States postage. As such, they are quite significant artifacts of this remarkable period of postal history.

Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 23). Ex Antrim (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1958). Accompanied by signed Ashbrook photo.

E. 50,000-75,000
90,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2007-09-27
The Buck Boshwit Collection of Confederate States
c
Sale Number 940, Lot Number 357, PostmasterNashville Tenn., 5c Carmine, 10c Green (61X2, 61X6), Nashville Tenn., 5c Carmine, 10c Green (61X2, 61X6)Nashville Tenn., 5c Carmine, 10c Green (61X2, 61X6). 5c deep rich color, large margins all around, 10c intense shade, large margins to just barely in along upper right frameline, both stamps tied by bold blue "Nashville Ten. Aug. 21, 1861" circular datestamp on reduced and repaired legal-size cover to Athens Tenn., from the Cleage correspondence, three-times 5c rate (1 to 1-1/2 ounces), part of embossed seal at top center

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED COVER WITH BOTH DENOMINATIONS OF THE NASHVILLE POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ISSUE. ONLY TWO CONFEDERATE STATES COVERS ARE KNOWN WITH DIFFERENT PROVISIONAL ADHESIVES USED TOGETHER, THIS BEING THE ONLY COMBINATION WITH A 10-CENT. A SPECTACULAR COVER AND OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE IN CONFEDERATE PHILATELY.

Combination frankings involving two different stamps are extremely scarce in Confederate philately. Even among the General Issues, covers showing 2c, 5c and 10c stamps used in any kind of combination are elusive, and those involving 10c stamps are exceedingly rare. We know of only two Confederate provisional combination covers: the Nashville Tenn. 5c and 10c combination offered here, ex Caspary, and the New Orleans 2c and 5c combination, ex Dr. Hubert C. Skinner (Siegel Sale 832, lot 3060). This Nashville cover is a three-times 5c rate and has been skillfully reduced and restored. The New Orleans cover was prepaid at the 10c rate, with a 1c overpayment.

Ex Caspary, Lightner and Freeland.

E. 75,000-100,000
85,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2010-05-27
The Steven C. Walske Collection of Civil War Special Routes
c
Sale Number 988, Lot Number 32, Southern Letter Unpaid MailNew Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3), New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3)New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID"%$ two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED (OFFERED IN THIS SALE), AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read; in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have Confederate State Postmaster Provisional stamps (both New Orleans and both offered in this sale). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-14. Illustrated in the National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial book and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas and Ishikawa.

E. 100,000-150,000
85,000
Back to Top
United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2016-03-16
The Steven Walske Collection of US-France Transatlantic Mail
c
Sale Number 1119, Lot Number 564, Civil War Period MailSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID, SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAIDSOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID. Perfect strike of blue two-line handstamp at bottom, another strike ties 12c Black, Plate 3, and 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (36B, 26) 12c stamp with double frameline at left, on border embossed 1861 cover to Paris, France, addressed to "Monsieur Hippolyte Messant, place Dauphine No. 14" (presumably Hippolyte Villemessant of Figaro fame), "New Orleans La. 10 Jun." (1861) circular datestamp and blue crayon "10" for prepaid Confederate postage, blue "Louisville Ky. Jun. 27" double-circle datestamp ties 3c stamp, "New York 9 Jun. 29" debit datestamp also ties 3c stamp, manuscript "15" (cents) applied in U.S. and "8" decimes due handstamp applied in France, which ties the 12c stamp, red Calais Jul. 13 arrival datestamp ties both stamps, Paris receiving backstamps (Jul. 13), stamps are scissors-separated but perfs are complete all around on both

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS ONE OF TWO RECORDED "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVERS BEARING THE 12-CENT 1860 ISSUE AND ONE OF ONLY FIVE TO A FOREIGN DESTINATION. ITS HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE, EXTREME RARITY AND IMPECCABLE QUALITY COMBINE TO MAKE IT ONE OF THE QUINTESSENTIAL COVERS OF AMERICAN POSTAL HISTORY.

The U.S. May 27, 1861, suspension order prohibited post offices from forwarding southbound mail to disloyal Southern states. However, northbound mail continued to be sent via Louisville. Through June 6, northbound mails were forwarded to Louisville from Memphis or Nashville. From June 7 through 12, only the Nashville post office forwarded mail to Louisville, and Louisville continued to forward mail north.

With the resignation of W. D. McNish as Nashville's Federal postmaster on June 12 and the withdrawal of the U.S. mail agent from this route, Louisville held the mails still being sent north by the discontinued post office at Nashville. On June 24, Dr. John J. Speed, the postmaster at Louisville, was advised to forward letters from the South to the loyal states after removing postage. With approximately 5,000 such letters accumulating at Louisville by this date, Postmaster Speed employed a more practical means of invalidating postage by creating the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" handstamp.

Because the U.S.-France treaty had a provision for unpaid mail, this cover was allowed to go through the U.S. mails with no postage due until arrival in France. Two covers from this correspondence are known, both identically addressed on the same embossed envelopes. They were carried together in the mail postmarked at New Orleans on June 10. The other cover, ex Antrim and Wishnietsky, lacks the Louisville June 27 datestamp and has a single strike of the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking on the stamps. They were presumably released on the same day, which means that the Louisville office did not mark all letters in a consistent manner.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication). The five recorded foreign-bound covers are as follows: 1) Louisville June 27, from St. Francisville La. to Prussia; 2) Louisville June 27, from Bayou Chene La. to France, ex Wunsch and Myers (Siegel Sale 882, lot 2001); 3) Louisville June 27, from New Orleans to France (the cover offered here, pictured on the front cover of the Special Routes book; 4) no Louisville datestamp, franked with Scott Nos. 36B and 26, from New Orleans to France, ex Antrim and Wishnietsky, Siegel sale 1064, lot 23; and 5) Louisville Jul. 11, from Petersburg Va. to England, 24c 1860, ex Matthies and Dr. Graves

Special Routes Census No. SLU-7. Ex Shenfield, Sweet, Judd and Kilbourne. Illustrated on p. 6 of Shenfield's Special Postal Routes and in Ashbrook's Special Service #28, p. 203. Pictured on the front cover and on p. 15 of the Special Routes book by Steven Walske and Scott Trepel

E. 80,000-100,000
80,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1021, Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6), Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6)Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6). Woodcut press-printed provisional at upper right corner of envelope, bold "Charleston S.C. Jul. 11, 186-" circular datestamp (1862 with blank fourth digit), addressed to Mr. A. O. Norris at Anderson C.H. S.C., receipt docketing "Written to & money sent the 14 July 1862" and "from J. H. Johnson", additional docketing in the same hand on back "Check 500/Cash 100/600 14 July 1862"

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE UNIQUE CHARLESTON 10-CENT PRESS-PRINTED PALMETTO TREE PROVISIONAL ENVELOPE, USED DURING A SHORTAGE OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUES.

After graduation from Princeton University, Alfred Huger returned to Charleston to run his plantation. Huger received his postmaster appointment from President Andrew Jackson on December 19, 1834, and he served until Federal occupation in February 1865. Huger was postmaster in July 1835 when sacks of mail containing abolitionist literature from the North were burned by a pro-slavery mob. After the war Huger declined President Andrew Johnson's offer of reappointment as a U.S. postmaster.

Huger issued press-printed typographic provisional envelopes in the summer of 1861, probably close to the earliest known date of August 16 (Calhoun census). The lithographed adhesive provisional stamp followed in early September 1861. Lithography was used by only three postmasters to print provisional stamps (Charleston, Livingston and Mobile). The first supply of Confederate General Issue stamps was placed on sale on December 7, 1861, and the provisionals were withdrawn from sale. However, provisionals purchased by the public prior to withdrawal continued to be used concurrently with the General Issues. In June and July 1862 the Charleston post office ran short of General Issue stamps, and provisionals were re-released. The latest recorded use of a Charleston provisional is dated August 5, 1862, with a mixed franking of the 5c De La Rue Print (Scott 6) and 5c adhesive (Richard L. Calhoun, "Inventory of Charleston, South Carolina, Postmaster Provisionals," Confederate Philatelist, Jan.-Feb. 1989).

It is reported that the stamps and envelopes were printed by the large Charleston-based printing firm of Evans and Cogswell. According to http://www.csa-scla.org : "...Evans & Cogswell Printing Company was retained as printers to the Secession Convention, and daily printed the minutes of the Convention in S.C., and printed the documents that communicated the secession to the other Southern States. The Ordinance of Secession, one of the most fateful and fatal documents in America's history, was lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. During the War Between the States, Evans and Cogswell printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier's Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy."

This Palmetto Tree design is unique among Southern Postmasters' Provisionals. On this entire -- the sole surviving example -- the woodcut is printed in dark blue, identical in shade and impression to the 5c provisional envelope stamp issued in August 1861. The circular datestamp is struck at the center of the upper half of the entire. Charleston did not have a separate cancelling device and used the datestamp to cancel adhesive stamps; therefore, the position of the complete datestamp on this entire confirms the presence of the printed provisional at upper right and precludes the removal of an adhesive stamp from the envelope.

The first Charleston provisionals were the press-printed 5c envelopes issued in August 1861 and used consistently until the estimated 5,000 prepared were sold out in November 1861 (dates range from August 16 to November 12, 1861). Approximately 25,000 5c adhesive stamps were produced and placed on sale as early as September 1861 (earliest recorded date is September 4). Both provisionals were used concurrently with the handstamped "Paid" markings, but the surcharge on the price of provisionals made the stamps and envelopes less popular with the public. When the General Issues were finally received and put on sale on December 7, 1861, the large number of 5c provisionals still on hand was withdrawn, although they remained valid for prepayment.

In June 1862 the supply of 5c General Issues available at the Charleston post office was running low, and Postmaster Huger authorized the renewed sale of provisionals. More than a dozen examples of the 5c provisional stamp are known used in the months of June, July and August 1862. The handstamped "Paid" marking was also used again briefly in June 1862 after having been previously retired in December 1861. The rate increase from 5c to 10c for any distance became effective July 1, 1862, during this shortage of General Issues. Charleston covers are recorded in early July 1862 with the 5c Blue Lithograph and 10c Rose Lithograph stamps, but these are scarce, indicating that only a small supply of the newer General Issues was available. Further evidence of the shortage is an August 5, 1862, cover with a combination of the 5c De La Rue stamp and 5c provisional for the 10c rate. A supply of press-printed 10c envelopes from an earlier printing was probably released in anticipation of the July 1862 rate change and in response to the shortage of General Issues. The provisional envelope's great rarity is probably due to the arrival of 10c Rose stamps in July 1862, which are found on covers dated July 3, 4, 5 and continuing on with frequency until replaced by the De La Rue and Richmond 5c printings.

This unique example of the 10c Palmetto Tree entire was discovered by the late Dr. Don Preston Peters of Lynchburg, Virginia, in an original correspondence to A. O. Norris at Anderson Court House, South Carolina. Norris was a newspaper publisher and, after the war, a probate judge. The receipt docketing indicates that the sender was J. H. Johnson. There was an ordnance sergeant with the 10th South Carolina Infantry Regiment named J. H. Johnson, who might be the same person.

We regard this entire as one of the most important and distinctive of all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals, by virtue of its extreme rarity, the distinctive Palmetto Tree design, and as one of the few 10c provisionals issued east of the Mississippi.

Ex Dr. Peters, Heathcote, Dr. Graves and Birkinbine. With Ashbrook letter

77,500
70,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1997-10-28
Confederate States
c
Sale Number 795, Lot Number 330, Postmasters ProvisionalsCharleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6), Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6)Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6). Woodcut provisional press-printed at upper right corner of entire, bold "Charleston S.C. Jul. 11, 186-" circular datestamp (1862 with blank fourth digit), addressed to Mr. A. O. Norris at Anderson C.H. S.C., July 14, 1861 receipt docketing "from J. H. Johnson"

EXTREMELY FINE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE CHARLESTON 10-CENT PRESS-PRINTED PALMETTO TREE ENTIRE, USED IN JULY 1862 DURING A SHORTAGE OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUES.

This Palmetto Tree design is unique among Confederate postmasters' provisionals, although the symbol was also used on the unissued 10c adhesive stamp prepared for the Charleston postmaster, Alfred Huger. On this entire - the sole surviving example - the woodcut is printed in a dark blue identical in shade and consistency to the 5c woodcut provisional issued in 1861. The circular datestamp is struck at the center of the upper half of the entire, a position consistent with virtually all recorded genuine examples of the earlier 5c entire. Charleston did not have a separate cancelling device and used the datestamp to cancel adhesive stamps; therefore, the position of the datestamp on this entire confirms the presence of the printed provisional at upper right and precludes any possibility that an adhesive was removed.

The first provisionals used in Charleston were the press-printed 5c envelopes issued in August 1861 (eku Aug. 16) and used consistently until the estimated 5,000 prepared were sold out in November 1861 (lku Nov. 12). Approximately 25,000 5c adhesive stamps were produced and placed on sale as early as September 1861 (eku Sep. 4). Both provisionals were used concurrently with the handstamped "Paid" markings, but the surcharge on the price of provisionals made these less popular with the public. When Confederate General Issues were finally received and put on sale at the Charleston post office on December 7, 1861, the large number of 5c provisionals still on hand was withdrawn, although letters franked with the provisionals were still accepted as prepaid.

In June 1862 the supply of 5c General Issues available at the Charleston post office was evidently diminished, and Postmaster Huger authorized the renewed sale of provisional adhesive stamps. More than a dozen examples of the 5c provisional stamp are known used in the months of June, July and August 1862. The handstamped "Paid" marking was also used again briefly in June 1862 after having been previously retired in December 1861.

The rate increase from 5c to 10c for any distance became effective July 1, 1862, during the shortage of General Issues. Charleston covers are recorded in early July 1862 with the 5c Blue Lithograph (Scott 4) or 10c Rose Lithograph stamps, but these are scarce, indicating that only a small supply of the newer General Issues was available. Further evidence of the shortage is an August 5th cover with a combination of the 5c De La Rue stamp and 5c provisional for the 10c rate.

The press-printed entire must be viewed in the context of the above-outlined events and circumstances. It was almost certainly issued in anticipation of the July 1862 rate change and in response to the shortage of General Issues. The 10c press-printed entire's great rarity is probably due to the arrival of 10c Rose Lithograph stamps in July 1862, which are found on covers dated July 3, 4, 5 and continuing on with frequency until replaced by the De La Rue and Richmond 5c printings. The total absence of unused 10c entires from the original printing is consistent with other Charleston provisionals, which were probably destroyed when the post office was moved in August 1863, following the shelling of Charleston by Union forces on Morris Island.

This unique example of the 10c Palmetto Tree entire was discovered by the late Dr. Don Preston Peters of Lynchburg, Virginia, in an original correspondence to A. O. Norris at Anderson Court House, South Carolina. Two pre-war covers from Pendleton and Greenville C.H., South Carolina, together with Dr. Peters' original notes, are included in this lot. The cover was offered in the 1949 auction of the Peters collection, at which time it was not listed in the Scott Catalogue. A letter from Stanley B. Ashbrook, dated November 19, 1949, is also included and affirms Ashbrook's opinion that the unique entire is genuine.

We regard this entire as one of the most important and distinctive of all Confederate postmasters' provisionals, by virtue of its extreme rarity, its Palmetto Tree design, and as one of the few 10c provisionals issued east of the Mississippi after the July 1862 rate change. There are sixteen unique Confederate postmasters' provisional adhesives (A) or press-printed entires (E); the others are from Austin Miss. (E), Beaumont Tex. (A - large 10c type), Bridgeville Ala. (A - pair), Fincastle Va. (E), Franklin N.C. (E), Hallettsville Tex. (A), Hillsboro N.C. (A), Jetersville Va. (A - pair), Kingston Tenn. (E), Knoxville Tenn. (A - 10c), Mt. Lebanon La. (A), New Smyrna Fla. (A), Port Lavaca Tex. (A), Rutherfordton N.C. (A) and Salisbury N.C. (E - damaged).

Ex Dr. Peters. Information on Charleston post office and provisional issues derived mostly from research published by Richard Calhoun and unpublished Levi records. Listed but unpriced in Scott and Dietz

E. 60,000-80,000
70,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1996-07-10
Civil War Postal History & Autographs
 
Sale Number 779, Lot Number 230, Confederate NotablesThe Album of J.E.B. Stuart, The Album of J.E.B. StuartThe Album of J.E.B. Stuart. 8vo (6-1/2 x 7-1/2 in.). Published by J.C. Riker, printed title page "ALBUM" with engraving by A.L. Dick and nine illustrations, hand-colored or black & white (including two with embellishments in pen and ink by Stuart himself), original brownish black boards, leather spine with design of woman, edges gilt; covers with edge wear and some loss to spine at top, pages showing scorch marks at bottom to varying degrees (see preface)

THE GENERAL'S PRIVATE ALBUM, CONTAINING 34 ORIGINAL POEMS WRITTEN IN HIS YOUTH.

All in Stuart's hand (32 signed "J.E.B.", one in full, one unsigned), with a wonderful preface, "This Album" datelined "Camp Stuart Texas Feby. 17th 1855" and which reads (in full): "This album is the sacred repository of a few contributions original and selected by some of my college companions while a student at Emory & Henry College Virginia, as pledges of their esteem when the owner left its halls to enter the Military Academy at West Point N.Y. in 1850. Since that time it has not been used exclusively as an album but as sketch book, and a place for jotting down some of the offspring of his own pen suggested by different circumstances and occasions, and also the recepticle of a few selections, suiting his fancy. As such it is a book private in its character and personal in its object. As it has followed me wherever I have gone since 1850, my companion in Scouts on the Northwestern frontier of Texas, in one of which it narrowly escaped being burnt, as the valise in which I kept it and all my clothes were consumed by the Prairie's catching on fire. I have deemed it proper to write this preface in order that should the book ever fall in others' hands, its ownership might be known and its character not misunderstood. J.E.B. Stuart Lieut. R.M.R." Stuart's poems are typical of a college-educated young man - effusive, melancholy, and filled with the usual archaic diction, but his occasional use of military imagery and the numerous references to the women in his life make these something more than of just passing interest to today's readers. Titles include "A Prayer," "To -" (An acrostic which spells out the name of Mary Custis Lee), "The Mesmeriser" ("Respectfully dedicated to Miss Minnie B. of West Point"), "Lines in Answer to a Valentine supposed to be written by Miss Agnes L.", "The Advent of Furlough," "Lines Written on Leaving the States for Texas," "To Miss Mary Joyner Kerr of N. Carolina," "The Dream of Youth (To his Sister Victoria)," "To Miss Emily of West Point," "Lines sent to a Lady with a box of prunes," "Lines Respectfully dedicated to Miss XXXX" - A Tale of Romance"), "To Mary," "Lines For a Lady's Album in St. Louis," "To Bettie" [see next lot], "Lines Respectfully inscribed to the Misses Crockett of Bowling Green Virginia," "To the One I Love," etc. There is also an 8-page poem, "West Point," dedicated to Mary Custis Lee, some prose and an interesting note, written in minute script over a brownish stain: "My Blood Mar. 8, 1855." In addition there are more than twenty pages of entries by friends and relatives, including a dedication in verse by Jno. S. Cocke ("This volume is a consecrated thing"), "To Jim on leaving College," "To my friend J.E.B. Stuart," "To Beaut," etc. Approximately 87 pages, each poem is dated, often with the place of composition noted: West Point, Steamer Trabue on Mississippi, Camp Seclusion, Camp Stuart, Camp on Jolly River Texas, etc. Virtually unknown to historians and the collecting community, this unique book is offered for the first time at public auction

E. 40,000-60,000
70,000
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-04-27
U.S. & C.S.A. Postal History
c
Sale Number 810, Lot Number 1897, Confederate States Postmasters Provisionals (Dalton to Macon)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7), Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7)Goliad Tex., 10c Black on Gray (29X7). Mostly ample to clear margins, ornaments just touched at top and upper right, strong impression on distinctive blue-gray paper, tied by "Paid" straightline on lady's cover -- a small high-quality envelope made of wavy-line watermarked paper -- to Stonewall Tex., with original letter enclosed, datelined "Goliad, Oct. 21st, 1863", invisibly sealed opening tear along top edge at upper left corner

EXTREMELY FINE. THE EARLIEST DATED EXAMPLE OF A GOLIAD PROVISIONAL AND ONE OF THE FINEST OF THE FOUR 10-CENT TYPE II GOLIAD COVERS AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS.

Of the eight Goliad 10c Type II (29X7) stamps in our records, five are used on covers, including an uncancelled stamp on a cover in the Tapling collection at the British Library, which leaves four covers available to collectors. Only three of the four covers have stamps tied by the town datestamp or "Paid" straightline. In addition to the normal 10c Type II, there are two other covers with the Type II "GOILAD" spelling error.

The earliest recorded date for any Goliad provisional is October 21, 1863, but it is our theory that the Type I provisionals were issued in 1861, followed in 1863 by a new provisional stamp printing from the Type II settings, which contain the postmaster's name and title. Therefore, this cover is more accurately described as the earliest known date for any Type II provisional.

Ex Hessel and Hill. With 1998 P.F. certificate ("genuine")

7,500
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1072, Nashville, TennesseeNashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6), Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6)Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6). Two huge margins, framelines touched at top and right, deep shade, scissors-cut at top left, tied by blue "Adams Express Co. Nashville Aug. 1" oval datestamp on United States 3c Red on White Star Die entire (U26) to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth in Petersburg Va., "Adams Ex. Co. * Louisville, Ky. * Jul. 30, 1861" circular datestamp cancels 3c embossed stamp, small red manuscript "2" express charge (two bits, or 25c), blue "10" handstamp applied at Petersburg to indicate postage due (presumably the letter was over the half-ounce weight limit), receipt docketing "Prof. Agnew & Sundry others", small part of backflap removed, light soiling and edgewear (slight improvement at top right corner)

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY COVERS WITH THE NASHVILLE 10-CENT PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE MIXED FRANKINGS WITH UNITED STATES POSTAGE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER THAT COMBINES THE RAREST ELEMENTS OF PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

Adams Express Company was required to ensure the prepayment of government postage (Federal and Confederate), although the letter was carried outside the regular mails. Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with across-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive).

Only three across-the-lines express covers are recorded with the Nashville 10c adhesive provisional (Special Routes Census Nos. S-AD-44, 45 and 46), all dated at Nashville on August 1. Only two of the 10c covers are mixed frankings (the third is used alone). These two Nashville 10c mixed-franking covers carried by Adams, both North-to-South usages, are the only 10c adhesive Confederate provisionals known in combination with United States postage. As such, they are quite significant artifacts from this remarkable period of postal history.

Our records contain six genuine covers with the Nashville 10c Green provisional: 1) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, to Hardy & Bros., Norfolk Va.; 2) Tied by Sep. 15, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to Shelbyville Tenn., ex Caspary; 3) 5c & 10c used together, tied by Aug. 21, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to D. Cleage, Athens Tenn., ex Caspary, Lightner, Graves and Boshwit; 4) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die entire to Rev. Leavenworth, Petersburg Va., ex Kilbourne and Walske, the cover offered here; 5) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die with additional 3c 1857, to Albert F. Ryan, Norfolk Va., ex Gallagher; and 6) Tied by "10" rate handstamp, Sep. 18, 1861, Nashville datestamp, on building corner card cover to Thos. H. Caldwell, Shelbyville Tenn., ex Needham, Kimmel, Haas and Rudy.

The addressee, Reverend Abner Johnson Leavenworth, was at this time the principal and proprietor of the Leavenworth Academy and Collegiate Seminary for Young Ladies.

Special Routes Census No. S-AD-46 (illustrated on p. 55). Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 23). Ex Antrim (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1958), Kilbourne, Kramer and Walske. With 1999 P.F. certificate

E. 75,000-100,000
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 91, Petersburg Va. To Victoria Tex.Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5), Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5)Uniontown Ala., 10c Red on Gray Blue (86X5). Position 1, large margins including top sheet margin, intense shade on deeply blued paper, well-tied by unusually clear strike of “Uniontown Ala. 9 Jun.” (1862) circular datestamp on brown cover to “John D. Pitts, Co. D, 4 Regiment Ala. Vol., Near Richmond Virginia”, faint vertical file fold well clear of provisional and markings

EXTREMELY FINE STAMP AND AN IMMACULATE COVER. ONLY EIGHT EXAMPLES OF THE UNIONTOWN POSTMASTER’S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL ARE RECORDED, OF WHICH FIVE ARE SOUND STAMPS ON COVER.

Eight examples of the Uniontown 10c Red are recorded by us. These are (in order of plate position):

1) Pos. 1 with stationer’s embossed crest, on cover to Maria L. Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Kimmel, Haas, Birkinbine, D.K. collection (lot 1121)

2) Pos. 1 on cover to John D. Pitts, near Richmond Va., ex Ferrary, Caspary, “Isleham” (Peyton), Hill, the cover offered here

3) Pos. 2 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Dr. Simon, D.K. collection (lot 1120)

4) Pos. 2 on cover to Maria Louisa Kidd, Port Royal Va., ex Brooks, Meroni, Kilbourne and Gross

5) Pos. 2 repaired stamp on repaired cover to Mrs. John B. Carey, ex Weill Stock

6) Pos. 3, corner crease, small tear, on lady’s embossed cover to Mr. Richmond Christian, Richmond Va., ex Hind

7) Pos. 4 on cover to Col. A. P. Calhoun, Pendleton S.C., ex Sweet, Muzzy, Boker

8) Pos. 4 uncancelled on large piece dated Sep. 27 (1861) with part of addressee’s name “S. Price”, Virginia destination, ex Caspary

Very few post offices east of the Mississippi River issued and used 10c adhesive (A) or press-printed (E) provisionals. This small group is as follows: Baton Rouge La. (A--three known); Charleston S.C. (E--unique); Danville Va. (E--probably not used); Fincastle Va. (E--unique); Fredericksburg Va. (A--never used); Greenville Ala. (A--two known); Greenwood Depot Va. (A--six known); Knoxville Tenn. (A--unique; and E--rare used); Marion Va. (A--seven known on cover); Nashville Tenn. (A--six known on cover); Tellico Plains Tenn. (A--never used); and Uniontown Ala. (A--eight known, seven on covers). All other 10c provisionals were used in Texas or were issued as handstamped entires.

The addressee, John Davidson Pitts, was a member of the Canebrake Rifle Guards, Co. D., 4th Alabama Infantry. He was killed in action on June 27, 1862, the day of his 19th birthday, while storming the Federal breastworks at Gaines’ Mill in the third of the Seven Days’ Battles. This cover was probably in Private Pitts’ possession when he died. His body was hastily buried under an apple tree in the Watt’s orchard. It was later recovered by his father and removed to Uniontown. John’s father, Phillip Henry Pitts, kept an extensive diary that sadly recorded the retrieval of his boy’s body (source: www.cowanauctions.com ).

Ex Ferrary, Caspary, “Isleham” (Peyton) and Hill. Caspary’s note on back reads “Cost $3,500 1929”. “W.H.C.” Colson and Ferrary trefoil handstamps at lower right (Ferrary sale notation in pencil at left). With 2004 P.F. certificate.

40,000
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-09-28
The Kilbourne Collection of Confederate Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 815, Lot Number 8, Austin, Miss.Austin Miss., 5c Red on Amber entire (8XU1), Austin Miss., 5c Red on Amber entire (8XU1)Austin Miss., 5c Red on Amber entire (8XU1). Distinctive ornamental provisional design, typeset and press-printed on upper right corner of yellow-amber envelope to Mr. James Philpott, Wood Lawn Tenn., clearly-struck "Austin Miss. 1861 [inverted] 2 Dec." circular datestamp and "Paid" straightline struck over red provisional, lightly creased away from markings, slightly reduced at right but clear of design, right side also has slight wear at corners reinforced with backing paper

FINE. THE UNIQUE EXAMPLE OF THE AUSTIN, MISSISSIPPI, POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL ENTIRE.

There are sixteen unique Confederate postmasters' provisional adhesives (A) or press-printed entires (E): Austin Miss. (E), Beaumont Tex. (A--large 10c), Bridgeville Ala. (A--pair), Charleston S.C. (E), Fincastle Va. (E), Franklin N.C. (E), Hallettsville Tex. (A), Hillsboro N.C. (A), Jetersville Va. (A--pair), Kingston Tenn. (E), Knoxville Tenn. (A--10c), Mt. Lebanon La. (A), New Smyrna Fla. (A), Port Lavaca Tex. (A), Rutherfordton N.C. (A) and Salisbury N.C. (E--damaged). This Austin entire was discovered by Harold C. Brooks in 1925 and to date is the only recorded example.

Ex Brooks and Wulfekuhler

20,000
67,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
1999-04-27
U.S. & C.S.A. Postal History
c
Sale Number 810, Lot Number 1910, Confederate States Postmasters Provisionals (Marion to Memphis)Marion Va., 10c Black (55X2), Marion Va., 10c Black (55X2)Marion Va., 10c Black (55X2). Huge margins at left and bottom, vertical rule shows in left margin, full margins at top and right, very minor sealed tear at right touches "o" of "Marion", tied by well-struck "Marion Va. Mar. 2" (1862) circular datestamp on brown homemade cover to Kingston Tenn., cosmetic restoration around edges of cover (paper is entirely original and the stamp is untouched)

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ARGUABLY THE FINEST OF THE FIVE AVAILABLE COVERS BEARING THE MARION POSTMASTER'S 10-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP.

The Marion Va. 5c and 10c provisional stamps, with their distinctive "Check" label at top, were issued by Postmaster J. H. Francis in 1861. The stamps were printed in two steps: first, the typeset form containing the border and words "P. Office, Marion, Va., Check. Paid" were impressed; then the values, "5" or "10" were handstamped on the blank center. Postmaster Francis described his stamps in a January 1880 letter to August Dietz, and he offered to make more from the "die" which he still possessed. Various "reprints" made from the typeset form were made by John W. Scott, including 2c, 15c and 20c values that have never been seen genuinely used.

Genuine Marion provisional stamps are extremely rare. Our records contain six covers with the Marion 10c provisional, plus a repaired stamp affixed to the back of a cover noted in the Crown book as part of the Worthington collection. There are two unused stamps and perhaps one or two off-cover stamps extant. Of the six known covers, one is part of the Tapling collection at the British Library (a sound example dated Oct. 15, 1861), two have stamps with a significant portion of the design cut away (dated Oct. 25 and Nov. 16, 1861), and one has the bottom right corner of the stamp repaired (dated Sep. 24, 1861, ex Caspary). Therefore, there remain only two covers available to collectors in essentially sound condition: the ex-Hessel cover (dated Nov. 18, 1861, with repairs to the cover) and the cover offered here, which is late use of the provisional stamp (Mar. 2, 1862).

Ex Freeland and Hill. With 1998 P.F. certificate (notes "closed tear")

12,000
62,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-12-10
The Peter Sharrer Collection of Confederate Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1035, Lot Number 12, Baton Rouge La.Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1), Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1)Baton Rouge La., 2c Green (11X1). Calhoun Type D, large margins to full at top right, bright shade on fresh white paper, neatly tied by unusually clear strike of “Baton Rouge La. Sep. 27, 1861” circular datestamp on immaculate white droprate cover locally addressed to Jno. P. Behrnes

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THE FINEST OF THE SIX RECORDED COVERS BEARING THE BATON ROUGE 2-CENT PROVISIONAL STAMP. AN OUTSTANDING 2-CENT CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL RARITY AND ONE OF THE GEMS OF THE SHARRER COLLECTION.

Of Scott No. 11X1 we record three unused, five used off cover or on piece, and five used on covers, for a total of 13 stamps. Of Scott No. 11X1a (“McCcrmick” error) we record three examples, including one unused stamp, one used off cover, and one used on cover. The cover offered here was described in the 1956 Caspary sale catalogue as “undoubtedly the finest in existence,” an opinion still supported by the record.

This particular 2c stamp is one of two known Baton Rouge provisionals (any denomination) with the Maltese Cross border showing a wider gap between the fifth and sixth ornaments at bottom (Calhoun Type D); every other recorded stamp shows the enlarged gap between the sixth and seventh ornaments at bottom. This stamp’s distinctive ornament arrangement is found at the top of Position 5 of the 5c setting and at the top of two examples of the 2c stamp. Most likely, the setting was altered between printings, and the top and bottom rows of ornaments were transposed.

Accompanied by a March 23, 1895, notarized statement from J. P. Behrnes (the addressee) attesting to the source and genuineness of the cover. Ex Caspary, Lightner, Lilly, Kilbourne and Gross. With 2009 P.F. certificate

27,500
62,500
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United States
Confederate States and Civil War-Related
-
Confederate States and Civil-War Related
2012-03-28
The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals
c
Sale Number 1022, Lot Number 1066, Nashville, TennesseeNashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3), Nashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3)Nashville Tenn., 5c Brick Red (61X3). Two, full to large margins except righthand stamp just touched along upper right frameline, bright shade, tied by blue "Nashville Ten. Aug. 21, 1861" circular datestamp on Hanging Lincoln Cartoon cover to "Messr. B. S. W. Gafford & Co., Undertakers, Camden, Madison Cty., Miss.", reduced at right, faint stain spots, minor edge wear

VERY FINE. ONLY TWELVE EXAMPLES OF THE CELEBRATED HANGING LINCOLN ENVELOPE ARE RECORDED. THIS IS THE ONLY EXAMPLE WITH A SOUTHERN POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL STAMP. ONE OF THE MOST CELEBRATED AND OUTSTANDING OF ALL CIVIL WAR ERA COVERS.

The Hanging Lincoln design is widely recognized as the most distinctive of all Civil War patriotics. In this extraordinary cartoon, President Lincoln is hanging upside down from a tree limb, with his symbolic axe and fence rail tied around his neck. The caption reads "Abe Lincoln the destroyer. He once split Rails. Now he has split the Union." To the left and right is the caption "The penalty of disregarding the constitution. Impeached, deposed, Tried and convicted" (there is a spelling correction from "diposed" to "deposed"). Standing beside Lincoln is a mustachioed Winfield Scott, labeled "Old Fuss n Feathers", dropping his sword and exclaiming "My glory is gone for ever." On the ground is the Union flag, captioned "The stars and stripes lie in the dust, Never to rise." A star at left has the caption "The southern star is rising" and the Confederate 11-star flag towers above with the caption "The stars and bars shall for ever wave triumphant." Along the bottom is the imprint "Copyright claimed. HM & WC Box 417 Nashville Tenn." Despite continuing investigation, we have been unable to uncover the identify of the publishers "HM & WC."

There are currently twelve recorded examples of the Hanging Lincoln cartoon envelope, all used within the Confederacy. This is the only one with a Postmaster's Provisional paying postage.

Illustrated in Crown and Wishnietzky books. Ex Caspary, Kimmel, Myers and Rudy. With 2004 P.F. certificate

E. 50,000-75,000
60,000
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FILTER: Area=United States, Sub Area=Confederate States and Civil War-Related, All Sale Dates thru 2017/03/30

21,748 Selected Lots , Page 1 of 1,088


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