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Census of 1c Blue, Type I (Scott 5)

5-UNC-001

5-UNC-001

Notes:
  • Bottom: Cut In But Identifiable (in at left, touched at right)
  • Top: Clear
  • Left: Cut In (most deeply along bottom left plume)
  • Right: Clear (barely clear at upper ornaments due to careless separation)
  • Unused (no gum). This single 7R1E was originally the left stamp of a strip of three, Positions 7-8-9R1E, with a larger top margin (see Ashbrook Special Service, p. 377). In an outrageous act of philatelic desecration, Sir Nicholas Waterhouse, an English accountant who obviously had a robot-like interest in numbers and lacked any normal human feeling either for his responsibility as a philatelist or for the preservation of important United States ephemera, cut apart the single from the adjoining pair, thus ensuring that his name would forever be inscribed in the annals of philatelic infamy. In an attempt to ameliorate the Waterhouse outrage, the severed pair has been kept with the single since 1955.
Provenance:
  • Ex Ferrary, Gilbert sale 4/5/1922 in Paris, as a strip of three, realized $278, purchased by Arthur Hind, the millionaire New York plush manufacturer, who also purchased the unique British Guiana One-Cent Magenta in the same sale. For a chatty firsthand account of Hind’s acquisition and Waterhouse’s subsequent desecration, see Ashbrook Special Service, p. 377.
  • Ex Hind, Charles J. Phillips sale 11/20/1933, still as a strip of three, realized $2,500 vs. $5,000 stated Scott value, selling to “Burris”(Maurice Burrus) according to SBA notation. Ultimately purchased by the desecrater Waterhouse. The single was donated by Waterhouse to the Red Cross in World War II and sold in 1943, purchased by Spencer Anderson, a dealer. Anderson sold it through the Baltimore dealer Perry Fuller to Ms. Metta Heathcoate.
  • Ex Heathcoate, whose collection was purchased by the Weills of New Orleans in a private treaty transaction around 1955 (some also offered in a Bruce G. Daniels sale).
  • Ex Rudolf Wunderlich, Siegel#484 1/29/1976, lot 146, realized $57,500 vs. $22,500 Scott value, purchased by Weill. Reported in Linn’s 6/14/1976 to be the highest price ever paid (at auction) for a single U.S. postage stamp up to that time. Weill also purchased the separated pair of 8-9R1E in the same sale, lot 146A, for $4,500 vs. $2,950 Scott value.
  • Ex “Concord” (this collection was presented as the 1994 Rarities sale), Siegel#759 5/19/1994, lot 28 (single and adjoining pair combined as one lot), realized $170,000 vs. $221,500 Scott value, purchased by Charles Shreve as agent for “Monte Carlo.” Subsequently exhibited at Anphilex in 1996 by “Monte Carlo”
Certificates:
  • PFC 172985 (1987) “Genuine” for the single
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